Phish, Black Sabbath & More Donate Thousands Of Meals Through Rock And Wrap It Up!

first_imgIt’s always heartwarming to discover your favorite musicians are also good people, and organizations like Rock And Wrap It Up! helps make that all possible. The award winning anti-poverty think tank has been working with touring bands, venues, and one music festival to facilitate the donation of prepared food to those in need, locally. The organization has worked with Phish, Black Sabbath, The Nikon At Jones Beach Theater, Madison Square Garden, The Meadows Festival and TobyMac in 2016 alone, recovering a total of 14,209 pounds of food! That’s over 11,000 meals donated, and over 7,000 pounds of Greenhouse gases diverted from landfills, according to RWU’s Whole Earth Calculator application.Jam scene fans will be happy to know that Phish donated over 4,000 pounds of food at their 37 tour dates in 2016. The organization’s Senior Project Analyst for music donations, Jocelyn Schreier, tells us more about the process of coordinating with these bands on the road. “We make this a seamless process for the donor and recipient. It takes a lot of organization to keep it that way. I speak to each caterer individually, and partner them with a volunteer from an anti-poverty agency nearby. Just a small effort from a caterer (by packaging up excess food and sometimes being a point of contact for volunteers) goes a long way and is so valuable and meaningful to the recipient agency. All of the recipients are local to where the band is playing, so the band gives back directly to the community they’re visiting.”She adds, “As a music lover myself, it’s always touching that these bands and their representatives are so eager to support this important cause.”The organization also recovers food from film shoots, sporting events, educational industries, and more. They also have other exciting anti-poverty campaigns, including Mardi Bra to recover  feminine hygiene products, Hotel Wrap to recover toiletries and other goods, Feed The Veterans to connect veterans with food agencies across the country, and policy advocacy initiatives to ensure that these types of programs are enacted into law.For more information about the organization, you can read this feature that we ran back in May, and head to the official Rock And Wrap It Up website to donate. You can also email Jocelyn if you represent a group that would like connect about this process. All donations are protected by the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act.last_img read more

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Phish Begins Their New York Curveball Redemption In Albany Fall Tour Opener [Photos]

first_imgThe last show Phish had scheduled in the state of New York, just in case you’d forgotten, was a little fest called Curveball. We all know how well that went. Sure, Dick’s would go on to scratch that itch for many would-be Curveballers, whether in person or via the complimentary consolation webcasts. But for fans in New York, Dick’s was just a big, salty reminder of what could have been—for the New York Phish faithful, redemption day has been circled on their calendars in thick red marker since that weekend: October 16th, the day Phish would make their rightful return to the Empire State to commence Fall Tour 2018 at the Times Union Center in Albany—indoors, rain-or-shine, turbidity be damned.With such a bad taste left in the Northeast’s mouth after the Curveball curveball, Albany felt primed to break out in its stead. However, the one thing that threatened to hold it back from greatness was its positioning as the tour opener. The first show of a Phish tour is often less than stellar, as the band gets reacclimated to the stage and shakes off the offseason rust. Such was the dilemma heading into Fall Tour’s first night in Albany: Would this be sweet salvation? Or would it be about kicking off cobwebs, as so many tour openers are. The answer, it turned out, was somewhere in between the two, as Phish delivered an ambitious show featuring plenty of high-energy improv and segues despite pushing through a handful of rough spots.“Moma Dance” came first to welcome the tour, reaching some energetic peaks before settling into its final refrain and, subsequently, launching straight into “Tube”. This stupendous, jammed-out rendition kept the pace high as the band worked through tight funk jam and some watery effects, building their way toward multiple hair-raising peaks.“Theme From The Bottom” got the call in the three-spot, continuing the trend of old reliable tunes to start the set. This unusual “Theme” reached a towering peak of its own as it led into its customary a cappella breakdown. However, instead of launching back into the “Theme” theme from there, Trey Anastasio led the band straight into “Free”—from feeding from the bottom straight to floating in the blimp. The segue echoed a similar one-two punch from Dick’s 2017, and was no less exciting here.“Army of One” came next, giving Page McConnell his turn in the spotlight before Mike Gordon‘s bass-y vocals signaled the start of “Halley’s Comet” to the approval of the energized crowd. After a short-and-sweet “Halley’s”, the band navigated straight into newer original “Everything’s Right”, which made several strong showings during Summer Tour. This version continued in kind—particularly in its first set placement—offering up more shimmering, submerged, Baker’s Dozen-reminiscent improv and some textbook Trey sustain before making a full segue into “Cities”. After a brief round of spacey improv, “Cities” gave way to “Walls of the Cave”, an appropriately rocking cap to a well above-average first set of tour.Phish returned to the stage after setbreak with “Ghost”, kicking off a non-stop set that saw them segue from song to song with varying degrees of success. As “Ghost” petered out, Page offered up some piano licks reminiscent of “No Men In No Man’s Land” before switching to the clav to dive into the Big Boat standout in earnest. The crowd’s reaction to this intricately textured “NMINML”—and, specifically, its “happy that we’re here” line—hit home with intent. It may not have worked out last time they were “here,” but now they’re back and playing as though they’ve put this summer’s Curveball debacle squarely behind them. Get ready for this fall run to make some serious waves.The unusual segue from “No Men” into “Piper” took many fans by surprise, as Trey’s vocals served as the lead-in rather than the usual instrumental build-up. You’ve heard of slow-build “Piper”—now, meet the no-build “Piper”. This “Piper” jam saw Mike Gordon and Jon Fishman take the lead, pushing the story in a number of interesting directions before fading into the ominous opening notes of “20 Years Later”. This marked the third rendition of the Joy cut this year, but was easily the most interesting of the group, weighing in as the improvisational highlight of the set. Many fans subscribe to the notion that Phish is at their best when they’re at their darkest, and this “20YL” did nothing to dissuade that thought process. Over the course of the song’s nearly 15 minutes, the band built schizoid tension over eerie synth swells, bass rumbles, and feedback loops, resulting in a powerful display of quintessentially “evil” Phish that’s surely worth revisiting later.Out of the darkness, Phish made their way somewhat awkwardly into a rare mid-set “Show of Life”. While this sentimental song often takes heat from fans for taking the wind out of the sails of strong sets, this version felt like a worthy contrast to the darkness of “20 Years Later”, and even featured a short but surprisingly strong improv that evoked the same beautiful feelings of contentment usually induced by high-caliber “Harry Hood” jams.With the clock rapidly winding toward the venue’s 11:00 curfew, the band had time for just a couple more tunes, which they used wisely on a “2001” > “Character Zero” dance party to round out the set. Finally, after a brief break, Phish returned to make good on the hinted direction of the preceding “Show of Life” jam with an excellent, peaking “Harry Hood” encore.Phish – “Harry Hood”[Video: Mike Kane]Two months to the day after cancellation day, New York state fans’ palates were finally cleansed from the turbid aftertaste of Curveball. Now, we can set our sights on tonight’s Albany finale and the remainder of the tour that follows it. While this was not the greatest Phish show of all time, it more than held its own when measured against other tour openers of the era. The band is hot, the weather is cool, and something very special looms in Vegas at the end of the month. We’ve just gotten started, but you can already feel good about Fall Tour. See you out there.For a full list of Phish’s upcoming tour dates, head to the band’s website.Below, you can view a gallery of photos from Phish’s 2018 Fall Tour opener via photographer Andrew Blackstein.Setlist: Phish | Times Union Center | Albany, NY | 10/16/18Set One: The Moma Dance, Tube, Theme From the Bottom > Free, Army of One, Halley’s Comet > Everything’s Right -> Cities > Walls of the CaveSet Two: Ghost > No Men In No Man’s Land > Piper > Twenty Years Later > Show of Life > Also Sprach Zarathustra > Character ZeroEncore: Harry HoodYou can listen to a full soundboard recording of the show via LivePhish.Phish | Times Union Center | Albany, NY | 10/16/18 | Photos: Andrew Blackstein Load remaining images Photo: Andrew Blackstein from 10/16/18center_img Photo: Andrew Blacksteinlast_img read more

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HSPH studies connect coffee to protection against heart failure, skin cancer

first_imgTwo new studies led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers provide good news for coffee drinkers, as the research links coffee consumption to reduced risk of heart failure and skin cancer.The first study, led by Elizabeth Mostofsky, research fellow at HSPH and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, found that drinking one or two cups of coffee daily may help protect against heart failure, but overindulging may lead to serious heart problems. The authors found that consuming about two 8-ounce cups of coffee daily may lower heart failure risk by up to 11 percent. The protective benefits of coffee appear to peak at the level of 16 ounces per day, and slowly decreased as more coffee was consumed. At more than five daily cups, not only was there zero benefit, but a potential for harm.In the second study, men and women who drink at least three cups of coffee a day were found to have a 20 percent lower risk of developing basal cell carcinoma than non-coffee drinkers. Basal cell carcinoma is a skin cancer that affects 2.8 million Americans annually. Senior author Jiali Han, associate professor in epidemiology at HSPH, and other researchers studied approximately 113,000 men and women who drank three or more cups of coffee a day. Decaffeinated coffee did not have the same benefit, they found, pointing to caffeine as the protective agent. Caffeine from cola and chocolate also appeared to decrease risk for basal cell carcinoma.last_img read more

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Grief, loss support groups serve as resource for members of tri-campus community

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the third article in an investigative series on the accessibility and effectiveness of mental health resources available within the tri-campus community.Mourning the loss of a loved one can manifest in many ways, from missing classes for some to skipping meals for others. Grief and loss support groups in the tri-campus community have been established as an extension of mental health services for students during this time. The Notre Dame grief and loss support group is offered for any student who has recently lost a loved one, a parent, sibling, friend or other family member, in order to help them in whatever way they need to handle their grief. Tami Schmitz, associate director of pastoral care, said in an email that participants in the group find support from their peers so they can realize they are not alone. The group meets for four sessions over the duration of the semester, co-facilitated by a campus minister and counselor.Similarly, Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry, in conjunction with Health and Counseling, hosts a grief and loss support group for students throughout the year.The group is an informal, wide open experience for anybody who wants to come for whatever grief they are experiencing, said Regina Wilson, director of Campus Ministry and facilitator of the support group. Wilson emphasized that the group is not only for students who have had some kind of death in their life, but is also open to anybody who has experienced any kind of grief associated with struggle or trauma in their life. Making yourself vulnerable while grieving can be a challenge for many, like Madyson McDougal. The sophomore at Notre Dame said she found comfort in the support group while mourning the loss of her father earlier this year. “Personally, it was kind of hard to first say that I needed help just because of who I am,” McDougal said. “I quickly got really close to the people there, and I’m very glad that I did that. I got to talk about what I was feeling and just hear from other people and know that they’re feeling the same things.”McDougal said she talked to many individuals on campus, including her rector and counselors, but found the grief and loss support group to be the most meaningful regarding her mental health. Schmitz said religion and spirituality are often used as an anchor to cope with mortality.“Death and loss are some of the most challenging times, and we are there to accompany each student and give them a space to grieve while also offering the support and comfort that is part of our Catholic faith,” she said. “We know that during times of loss, our faith can be shaken, but we also know it often times helps us get through those times.”  Being a Catholic university, Catholicism is the base of the structure of the groups, but students of all faiths are welcome, Schmitz said.“The underlying purpose of the group is a belief in the resurrection,” she said. “The motto of the Congregation of Holy Cross is ‘Hail the Cross, Our Only Hope.’ What that means is that even in our darkest times, we can find hope and meaning.”Wilson said the group at Saint Mary’s is rooted in an idea that, as a people, we have a lot of things that affect us and our relationship with one another and with God. One of the more profound experiences that we have that affect our relationships with one another and God is death, Wilson said.“It helps us that there is hope,and that we experience that new stuff, and when we are together, and we can tell our stories, and we know that God is present,” she said.Wilson said she believes the ties between mental health, spirituality and grief are prevalent and under-discussed.“Grief is natural,” she said. “There’s a natural response to loss and it affects all aspects of our lives, affects our relationship with God.”Wilson said grief affects students’ ability to function physically, and also mentally, as students can have a hard time concentrating when feeling depressed or sad.“This group is a very holistic approach in the sense that it really invites people to sit together, to pray together to talk together,” she said. “It’s not the full healing process, but it attempts to be part of the healing process.”Schmitz said the loss of a loved one is among the most devastating things that can happen to people, especially students.“It can be a time of isolation and truly feeling like they are totally alone. Meeting other students who have similar losses provides some comfort,” she said. “I have seen beautiful friendships form out of the group. They also give each other practical tips on how to navigate issues such as going for the holidays or keeping up in classes or dealing with roommates. I often find the group space is simply ‘sacred’ and allows for lots of emotions, support and a sense of belonging.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Grief and Loss, Investigative Series, Mental health, mental health resources, Pastoral Care, Saint Mary’s Health and Counseling, Saint Mary’s Campus Ministry, support grouplast_img read more

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Circ-Williston DEIS Comment Period Extended to November 21

first_imgMONTPELIER The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration is extending the public comment period associated with the Circ-Williston Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Section 4(f) Evaluation.The original deadline for filing comments about the Circ-Williston Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was November 8. That deadline has been extended to November 21, 2007. The Circ-Williston DEIS has been publicly available since August 10, 2007.We received indication that some people want additional time to provide detailed comment, said VTrans Secretary Neale Lunderville. With a study of this size, giving the public an additional two weeks to file comments regarding this important project is reasonable and appropriate.The DEIS can be directly downloaded from the projects website at www.circeis.org(link is external).The DEIS also is available for viewing at the main public libraries in Burlington, Colchester, Essex, Essex Junction, and Williston; as well as at the Federal Highway Administration office, Room 216, 87 State Street in Montpelier; and at the VTrans project office at 20 Kimball Avenue, Suite 301, South Burlington. (Please contact Ken Robie at 802-828-2645 to ensure that the VTrans South Burlington office is open when you wish to visit.)Comments should be directed to Kenneth Robie, Project Manager, VTrans, 1 National Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05633-5001, 802-828-2645, [email protected](link sends e-mail) or Kenneth R. Sikora, Jr., Environmental Program Manager, Federal Highway Administration, Region 1, P.O. Box 568, Montpelier, VT 05601, 802-828-4423, [email protected](link sends e-mail).last_img read more

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Welch announces energy efficiency program to retrofit millions of homes and buildings

first_imgRepresentative Peter Welch introduced an energy efficiency bill today designed to retrofit millions of homes and commercial buildings and increase efficiency by 20 percent or more nationally.Welch outlined the bill at a Capitol Hill press conference Thursday with many of the bill’s 30 cosponsors and representatives from national efficiency, contracting and environmental groups.The Retrofit for Energy and Environmental Performance (REEP) program would provide financial incentives to homeowners and businesses to reduce their energy use and save them money. The program would fund state and municipal investments of up to half the cost of retrofitting the nation’s existing homes and buildings, which account for 10 percent of global carbon emissions. REEP would create tens of thousands of middle class jobs and provide a significant boost to the economy.“Investing in energy efficiency is a practical, commonsense strategy to create jobs, save on energy costs and do our part to fight climate change,” said Welch, a member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. “Increasing energy efficiency by 20 percent is not only entirely within our power, but it makes perfect sense during tough economic times. It’s high time we bring this successful Vermont model to the national stage.”Welch’s bill directs the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency to develop guidelines and manage financing for the national energy efficiency program. Homeowners and businesses could qualify for direct cash incentives, interest rate subsidies and credit support based on the percentage increase in energy efficiency they achieve:Homeowners could qualify for $1,000-$3,000 in financial incentives for achieving a 10-20 percent increase in efficiency, with another $150 for every additional percentage point of energy savings achievedBusinesses could qualify for $0.15 per square foot for the first 20 to 30 percent increase in efficiency with an increasing incentive of up to $2.50 per square foot for energy reductions over 50 percentIncentives for both homes and commercial buildings would be capped at 50 percent of the cost of the retrofitFunding for the program would go to the states through the existing State Energy Program formula, which has a built-in small state minimum, and provides additional financial incentives to states with high-performing programs. “If there’s one thing in the climate change debate we can agree on it’s the need to improve efficiency,” Welch said.The bill’s 30 original cosponsors include: Reps. Earl Blumenauer, Bruce Braley, Lois Capps, Russ Carnahan, André Carson, Donna Christensen, Steve Cohen, Joe Courtney, Elijah Cummings, Kathy Dahlkemper, William Delahunt, Keith Ellison, Martin Heinrich, Jim Himes, Maurice Hinchey, Mike Honda, Jay Inslee, Steve Israel, Carolyn C. Kilpatrick, Jim Langevin, Carolyn B. Maloney, Eric Massa, George Miller, Patrick J. Murphy, Frank Pallone, Ed Perlmutter, Carol Shea-Porter, Harry Teague, Paul Tonko, and Chris Van Hollen.Welch was also joined at the event by Jim Presswood of the Natural Resources Defense Council, Steve Nadel of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Emily Wadhams of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Michelle Moore from US Green Buildings Council, and representatives from Efficiency First.“The cheapest and easiest way to reduce energy use and global warming pollution is by making our homes and buildings more efficient,” Presswood said. “By improving our nation’s efficiency, we can reduce our dependence on dirty fuels, save people money on their energy bills, and create local jobs from Vermont to California. Congressman Welch has quickly become a leader in Washington on combating global warming, and this bill affirms his dedication to tackling this challenge.”# # #last_img read more

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Chief executive leaves Mentmore Abbey

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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REITs can mix it up with the old guard

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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In Spain, asparagus lies unpicked as lockdown shuts out migrant workers

first_img“Many people have contacted us but we know from experience that although they start with a lot of gusto, they are not accustomed to this kind of work and it exhausts them,” he said.Out of 40 or 50 workers interviewed and hired for the lockdown harvest, only around 10 remain, he said.In a muddy field, laborers bend to cut the green spears with a long curved knife. They place the asparagus in plastic boxes that are collected by tractor. The vegetable is then brought to the warehouse and bundled ready for sale.In the packing shed is Elena Garcia, a self-employed beautician who worked in a hairdresser’s until losing her job due to the lockdown.”I think it’s harder working out in the field than here packing. Here the work is tough but I get along fine,” she said.  Topics : In normal circumstances, Urbina exports part of his produce. But with so much of the crop lying unpicked, Spain is in the unprecedented situation of having to import asparagus from Germany to meet domestic demand, he said.Facing one of the world’s worst outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease, Spain went into lockdown on March 14, closing borders and confining people to home.In early April, the government started an initiative to get more workers into the fields, authorizing temporary hiring of tens of thousands of immigrants or jobless people.But many who have applied to pick asparagus do not have the stamina of the foreign seasonal workers who traditionally move from harvest to harvest across Spain, said Urbina.center_img About half of farmer Jaime Urbina’s asparagus crop lies unpicked in his fields in central Spain as border closures to curb the coronavirus block Eastern European seasonal laborers.Right at peak food-harvesting time, farms across the nation have a shortfall of thousands of workers. Asparagus, especially, requires a lot of labor as it is harvested piece-by-piece.”Everyone here in the asparagus sector has this problem – we don’t have the manpower,” Urbina lamented, standing in a field in Torre del Burgo in Guadalajara province.last_img read more

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Chairman retires at UK Universities Superannuation Scheme

first_imgThe university employers representative, Universities UK (UKK), initially appointed Harris to the trustee board in 1991, before he went on to lead the organisation in 1997.In his final months as chair of the scheme, Harris oversaw a debate between the employers group and trade unions over the future of the scheme.The current proposals, set to be implemented by the USS board include fully closing the final salary section of the defined benefit fund and moving all members’ future accrual to career-average benefits.USS opened a career-average section for new employees in 2011, accounting for one-third of the scheme’s members.In addition to dropping final salary benefits for academics, the fund will become a hybrid scheme with defined contribution accrual for all entitlements above a £55,000 earnings cap.The current deputy chair, Kevin Carter, is an independent member of the trustee board and became deputy in April 2014, after the retirement of John Bull. Sir Martin Harris has stepped down as chair of the trustee board for the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) after nine years in the role.He officially stepped down at the end of March, with the scheme set to announce his successor in the coming days.Harris joined the UK’s largest scheme as a director in April 1991, when he served as vice-chancellor of the University of Essex.He became deputy-chair of the £41.6bn (€57bn) pension fund in 2004, taking over as chairman two years later.last_img read more

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