Helo expects 100 million monthly users by 2019end

first_imgNew Delhi: Social media app Helo expects to double monthly active user to 100 million by the end of this year, mainly on the back of increased focus over content creation on its platform. “We have completed one year of our operations in India. We were 25 million in 2018 and in first two quarter our monthly active users (MAU) have grown by 100 per cent to 50 million in first half of 2019. By end of this year, we expect to reach 100 million MAU,” Helo, Head of Content Operations, Shyamanga Barooah said. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in SepHe said the company has been focussing on to promote content creators, which led to growth in MAU of Helo – owned by Chinese firm Bytedance that operates popular video app TikTok. Barooah said that with focus on Indian users, the company has started connecting non-resident India in more than 13 countries including – USA, Canada, Singapore, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Oman, Kuwait, Qatar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, South Africa, and Bangladesh. “Now, we want to grow our platform by 300 per cent across all parameters by end of 2019 compared to our business in 2018. It will be features, partners etc and not just in terms of user base,” he said.last_img read more

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Côte dIvoire Annan urges parties to consolidate efforts to end fighting

“The Secretary-General is encouraged by the cessation of hostilities in Côte d’Ivoire,” a spokesman for Mr. Annan said in a statement. “He urges the parties to do everything possible to consolidate this important step through dialogue and national reconciliation.”According to the statement, the UN will continue to back the sustained efforts of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) to help the Ivoirian people achieve peace, tolerance and prosperity in their country.”The Secretary-General calls on other international partners to remain attentive to the needs of Côte d’Ivoire in this difficult period,” the spokesman said. read more

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Countries urged to make dementia public health priority as UN conference opens

Who is affected? What does it cost? “The aim of the conference is to raise awareness of the socio-economic burden created by dementia, and to highlight that this burden can be reduced if the world collectively commits to placing dementia high on the global public health agenda,” WHO said in its announcement of the two-day conference that is being held at its headquarters in Geneva.The first day of the conference tackled problems ranging from research to care and human rights posed by dementia, which affects some 47 million worldwide, a number that is expected to nearly triple by 2050. The UN independent expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons, Rosa Kornfeld-Matte, in a special intervention on the human rights aspects of the disease, said persons with dementia must have their dignity, beliefs, needs and privacy respected at all stages of the disease. She urged governments worldwide to effectively integrate a human rights-based approach to their global action against dementia.“Persons with dementia, including older persons with this disease, should be able to enjoy their rights and freedoms in any circumstances,” said Ms. Kornfeld-Matte, whose mandate comes directly from the UN Human Rights Council.Dementia – A pubic health priority What are the symptoms? Global action against dementia – What we must do What can help people with dementia? What are the challenges? “I call on all States and other stakeholders to effectively adopt a human rights-based approach when addressing dementia,” she said.WHO risk communications expert Gaya Gamhewage, who moderated one of five panels today, asked the audience to count to four.“One thousand one, one thousand two, one thousand three, one thousand four,” Dr. Gamhewage counted out loud and said in that amount of time, “Another person was diagnosed with dementia.”According to WHO, dementia is “a syndrome that affects memory, thinking, behaviour and ability to perform everyday activities – usually of a chronic or progressive nature. Dementia is overwhelming not only for the people who have it, but also for their caregivers and families. There is a lack of awareness and understanding of dementia in most countries, resulting in stigmatization and barriers to diagnosis and care.”Dementia is caused by a variety of diseases and injuries that primarily or secondarily affect the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease or stroke, and there is no treatment currently available to cure dementia or to alter its progressive course.Two people living with dementia, Hilary Doxford, who did not get a diagnosis for seven years, and Michael Ellenbogen, who had already lost his job by the time he received his diagnosis, appealed to governments about the need for earlier and correct diagnoses.Ms. Doxford and Mr. Ellenbogen were joined by Sona Bari, who was a caregiver for her mother who has dementia, in raising the urgent need for governments to think long term and make dementia a public health priority.Tomorrow, the conference will focus on how “to collectively move the global dementia agenda forward.” read more

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