Environment Minister Dorsett visits oil spill site at Clifton Pier

first_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp October 4th, 2014Hon. Kenred DorsettMinister of the Environment and Housing RE: Oil Spill In Waters of New ProvidenceThe Government is aware of an oil spill in waters on the south western end of New Providence, near to Stuarts Cove and Albany. Government officials were on site at Stuarts Cove and Albany to assess the extent of the oil spill and its impact. I want to assure the general public that the Ministry of Transport and Aviation, the Ministry of Environment and Housing, the Department of Environmental Health Services, the BEST Commission and all other relevant agencies have been advised of this incident and dispatched. In addition, the Government has retained international consultants who are expected to arrive in the Capitol on Monday to assist in:1. investigating and confirming the source (s) of the oil spill;2. assess the impact of the oil spill;3. address the mitigation of this spill,4. advise on the preparation of an environmental management plan for the area5. make remediation recommendations.The Clifton area has been plagued with oil spills for many for decades. This Government is resolved and committed to address this vexing problem. END Related Items:albany, bahamas, clifton, dorsett, oil spill, stuarts cove Bahamian music legend gunned down at home in Turks and Caicoscenter_img Hurricane Jose Not A Threat to The Bahamas, For Now Bi-lateral talks with Bahamas to resume, UK gives green light to high-level TCI delegation Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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Paywhatyouwant choices appear to be linked to self image

first_img Explore further Corporate social responsibility and profit could stem from pricing strategy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the first experiment riders at an amusement park were given the opportunity to buy pictures of themselves on the ride and were told they could pay whatever they wanted. Some were also told that half the proceeds would go to a charity; in those cases customers quite often paid more than those that weren’t told about the charity, though the number of sales were lower.In a second experiment, some customers on boat rides were asked to pay $15, some $5 and the others whatever they wanted, for pictures of themselves. Not surprisingly, the $15 group had few takers, while the $5 option proved popular, even more so than the PWYW option, as more chose to pass on the photos altogether when given the opportunity to pay whatever they liked.In the third experiment, diners at a restaurant were asked to pay whatever price they chose for their meal, but were split into two groups. One group paid the owner of the restaurant directly, while the other group was allowed to pay privately by dropping an envelope into a box. Surprisingly, the group that was able to pay anomalously generally paid more than did those that paid the owner directly.The researchers say taken as a whole, these experiments show that people are motivated by several factors when presented with a PWYW opportunity; the most basic of which, is the desire to uphold their opinion of themselves. Giving more than is necessary in an anonymous way causes people to feel good about themselves. On the other hand, the offer is less appealing when being asked to pay in view of others, such as fellow patrons or the owner of a restaurant. In such a scenario, people feel forced into paying a certain price. They also shy away from opportunities when they feel pressured to buy at a price that is too high, hence those that choose to not buy at all, even when allowed to pay whatever they wanted. More information: Pay-what-you-want, identity, and self-signaling in markets, PNAS, Published online before print April 23, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1120893109AbstractWe investigate the role of identity and self-image consideration under “pay-what-you-want” pricing. Results from three field experiments show that often, when granted the opportunity to name the price of a product, fewer consumers choose to buy it than when the price is fixed and low. We show that this opt-out behavior is driven largely by individuals’ identity and self-image concerns; individuals feel bad when they pay less than the “appropriate” price, causing them to pass on the opportunity to purchase the product altogether. © 2012 Phys.Org Citation: Pay-what-you-want choices appear to be linked to self image (2012, April 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-pay-what-you-want-choices-linked-image.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) — Panera, the national restaurant chain most famous for its bread, has been in the news of late because they’ve decided to test the concept of allowing customers to pay whatever they want for bread, sandwiches and salads. The concept has proved so successful that Panera plans to open more restaurants that do likewise. To find out why such an idea might work, a group of researchers put together several field experiments to test their belief that the amount people pay for a pay-what-you-want (PWYW) opportunity, likely depends on their desire to boost their own self image. They have published a paper documenting their findings in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.last_img read more

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Study finds bumblebees able to fly as high as Mount Everest

first_img Journal information: Biology Letters Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Study finds bumblebees able to fly as high as Mount Everest (2014, February 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-bumblebees-high-mount-everest.html More information: Surpassing Mt. Everest: extreme flight performance of alpine bumble-bees, Published 5 February 2014. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2013.0922AbstractAnimal flight at altitude involves substantial aerodynamic and physiological challenges. Hovering at high elevations is particularly demanding from the dual perspectives of lift and power output; nevertheless, some volant insects reside and fly at elevations in excess of 4000 m. Here, we demonstrate that alpine bumble-bees possess substantial aerodynamic reserves, and can sustain hovering flight under hypobaria at effective elevations in excess of 9000 m, i.e. higher than Mt. Everest. Modulation of stroke amplitude and not wingbeat frequency is the primary means of compensation for overcoming the aerodynamic challenge. The presence of such excess capacity in a high-altitude bumble-bee is surprising and suggests intermittent behavioural demands for extreme flight performance supplemental to routine foraging.center_img (Phys.org) —A pair of researchers has found that alpine bumblebees are able to fly at altitudes in excess of twenty nine thousand simulated feet—higher than Mount Everest. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Michael Dillon and Robert Dudley, of the University of California and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, respectively, describe experiments they conducted with alpine bumblebees in pressure chambers and their theories as to why the bees have such high flying skills. Image credit: Wikipedia. 1st ‘zombie’ bees on East Coast found in Vt. (Update) Bees aren’t the best flyers, of course, they can zig-zag around and hop from flower to flower, but they could never compete with most birds or many other insects for that matter. But they are able to do something remarkable nonetheless—fly at extremely high altitude. To discover this remarkable ability, Dillon and Dudley traveled to the mountains of Sichuan, China; once there they captured several specimens of alpine bumblebees who normally live and fly at altitudes of over 10,000 feet. They put the bees (one at a time) into a pressure chamber and then pumper air out to simulate various altitudes. In so doing they found that two of the bees were able to fly around in the chamber in conditions that simulated 29,527 feet.To better understand how it was that the bees were able to fly under such conditions, each was filmed with a high speed camera and audio recorded (to measure wing beats). In studying the sound and video, the researchers found that the bees did not increase the speed of wing flapping but instead moved them in much deeper arcs, allowing for more scooping of air with each beat.The research duo suggest the bees high-flying technique is more likely put to a different use in the their natural environment—it would help in moving faster to escape being eaten, and even more perhaps in carrying heavy loads of nectar.Still a mystery is how the bees were able to maintain their wing flapping with far less oxygen to breathe—their metabolisms normally run much faster than most creatures—with less oxygen in the pressure tank, they should have literally run out of breath. Dillon and Dudley plan to conduct more experiments with the bees to answer that question.last_img read more

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As spring arrives in city thousands down with flu

first_imgKolkata: With the arrival of spring, resulting in frequent change in weather conditions, thousands of Kolkatans are down with a spate of viral diseases.”During the spring, with the transition from winter to summer, it becomes difficult for the body to adapt to such fluctuating weather conditions. An ounce of precaution can reduce the possibility of multiple diseases such as pneumonia, common cold, measles, diarrhea, and pox,” said physician Swapan Biswas. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseOn Thursday, the minimum temperature in the city remained at 17 degrees Celsius, while the maximum temperature was two degrees more than the average at 30 degrees Celsius. The maximum humidity remained at 89 percent, while the minimum humidity came down to 33 percent with no rainfall in sight. While on Wednesday, Kolkata witnessed a normal maximum temperature of 29.2 degrees Celsius and minimum temperature remained 2 degrees below the normal temperature at 15.6 degrees Celsius. Biswas said such diseases are a common occurrence among children and old people as they are highly susceptible to spring sickness. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”During this season, it is important to maintain the room temperature as well as avoid coming in contact with direct sunlight. At night, it is advisable to keep a blanket at our disposal and also to wear warm clothes. It is important to drink at least three to four litres of water every day and to consume fruits which are rich in Vitamin C after lunch. These fruits can also be substituted with vitamin tablets.” He further said: “To avoid falling ill due to diarrhea which is a common occurrence among children during this season, it is recommended to maintain a proper food hygiene by avoiding stale food and also using a hand wash”. Although the state of West Bengal which has remained dry for quite some time, it will witness a spurt of rainfall at the end of this week. Moloy Bose, an official of the Regional Meteorological department in Alipore said, “Rainfall activity is likely to make an appearance around February 16 in the districts of Purulia, Bankura, Birbhum, West Midnapore, Jhargram and other districts of North Bengal. Moreover, the city of Kolkata is likely to see light rains on February 16 and 17”, He said: “The rainfall will last from February 16 to February 18 and although, it may recede from Gangetic Bengal, it will rain in districts of North Bengal.”last_img read more

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Puma Teases SelfLacing Sneaker to Compete With Nikes

first_img Step aside, Nike. Puma on Thursday unveiled its own self-lacing sneaker to compete with the Adapt BB Nike introduced last month.Slated for release in 2020, the Puma Fi features a tiny motor, which powers a cable system that “laces” the training shoe when you swipe a touch module on the tongue, Puma said in a news release. And that’s not its only trick.”It comes with a smart sensing capability that learns the shape of the foot of each user and adapts the fit of the shoe to the individual,” Puma wrote. “Athletes can also monitor, adjust, and finetune fit through a smartphone app. To make things even more athlete-friendly, users can make on-the-fly adjustments with their Apple Watch$699.99 at Apple Store.”Check out the video below for a peek at the Puma Fi.Puma is now seeking “tech-savvy” volunteers to beta test the upcoming shoe and provide feedback about its design, usability, and engineering. Interested individuals can sign up for the Fi beta test program via Puma’s Pumatrac app, which is available for iOS and Android.According to Engadget, the Fi will be priced at $330 when it arrives next year, undercutting Nike’s $350 Adapt BB.Fi isn’t the only high-tech Puma shoe to get excited about. The company recently revived a computerized running shoe it first released in 1986 called the RS-Computer, updating it with Bluetooth support and a dedicated app. Getting your hands on the new RS-Computer might be a challenge, however: Puma only plans to release 86 globally, honoring the year they were first released. 2 min read February 1, 2019 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This story originally appeared on PCMag Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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