iRemember

first_imgJunior Chris Hunt was scanning his Facebook newsfeed on his Mac when he first read the news about the death of former Apple CEO Steve Jobs. “You can’t really talk about the 21st century without talking about Steve Jobs,” Hunt said. “He basically built the framework for how we communicate.” Jobs died Wednesday after a long battle with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Though Jobs never completed college, Hunt said the businessman is an example to students at Notre Dame because of his determination and persistence. “Even though he didn’t finish college, he loved learning,” Hunt said. “He was determined and always tried to keep learning and expanding himself.” James O’Rourke, professional specialist for the Mendoza College of Business, said Jobs was not only a skilled business executive, but also “an extraordinary leader and visionary.” “Steve Jobs changed the way we communicate and made all of us better at what we do,” O’Rourke said. “That’s an extraordinary legacy.” Jobs build a unique culture at Apple during his time at the head of the company, O’Rourke said. “While others saw risk and danger in technology investment, Steve saw opportunity,” he said. “He also saw around corners.  He had the uncanny ability to tell what was coming next because he had a hand in creating it.  He built loyalty, enthusiasm and exceptional quality into his brand.  There is, quite literally, no one else like him in the world today.” The development of the Apple brand revolutionized the market and made the company a household name, he said. “Depending on which survey you read, it’s either the largest or one of the largest companies in the world in terms of market capitalization,” O’Rourke said. “That came about as a result of exceptionally bright, insightful, loyal employees who’ve turned the Apple brand into something of a consumer cult. As the company looks to the future, O’Rourke said Jobs’ shoes will be big ones to fill. “The trick now for [Jobs’ successor] Tim Cook is to support and nurture the culture and encourage all of those who were attracted to Mr. Jobs to sustain their momentum,” he said. “He won’t have the same genius insight into technology that Jobs had, but he has enormous resources and some of the best minds on earth working for him.  He won’t have the same personal charisma and communicative abilities, but who would?” Sophomore Catherine Simonson said she uses her iPod every day. “I think [Jobs] kind of defined our generation,” Simonson said. “Even in terms of email, it is just assumed that you will get your email on your phone now … I was watching a video about him where he was talking about the iPhone. He said, ‘This is your life in your pocket.’” Apple has been at the center of technological developments over the past several decades “He played a major role in solidifying [the way we communicate] in that aspect,” she said. Cory Angst, assistant professor of management, called the former Apple CEO a “mastermind.” “I think the thing that sets him [and Apple] apart … from other innovative companies is that he has always taken the approach that you can’t ask customers what they want because they don’t actually know what to ask for,” he said. The big question now for Apple is whether the company will continue to produce cutting-edge products without Jobs, Angst said. “There are few people that would say that the success of a multi-billion dollar company like Apple could hinge on only one person, even a charismatic leader like Jobs,” Angst said. “I suspect that what Jobs has left is a highly innovative culture that now pervades all ranks of employees at Apple, and I fully expect them to innovate for decades to come.” American Studies professor Robert Schmuhl said Jobs also shaped the world of modern media. “With Jobs at the helm, Apple has been in the vanguard of media development,” Schmuhl said. “The communications world is different because of him. Music is distributed differently. Entertainment is more accessible. And news now arrives via iPhone or iPad at any moment.” Schmuhl said the future of Apple is now uncertain. “Can Apple continue to lead the way without him?” Schmuhl said. “That’s a question worth considering now.”last_img read more

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We choose to be free. Keep your money.’

first_imgATHENS — Media coverage of the demonstrations taking place in Athens often includes footage of anarchists throwing Molotov cocktails, riot police releasing a sea of tear gas and widespread chaos. Needless to say, I was a little nervous when my friends and I decided to head to Syntagma Square during a scheduled demonstration. The Greek Parliament Building is located in Syntagma Square, making it the epicenter for Athenian protests. Tensions were especially high Saturday, as Greek Parliament prepared to vote on another round of austerity measures. If passed, the new regulations would curtail laborers’ collective bargaining rights and lower the minimum wage, among other mandates. Many groups, such as the Pan-Hellenic Fighting Front, were unhappy with the stipulations. The groups often congregate somewhere in the city at a scheduled time and march to Parliament as one massive, indignant crowd. The demonstrations typically start peacefully, but have the potential to erupt into occasional violence. Just the day before our visit to Syntagma Square, protestors smashed the sidewalk and threw chunks of marble at riot police. We arrived at the Parliament building before the groups started to congregate, so the crowd was relatively sparse. I soon realized a lot of the people there were like me, curious bystanders wanting to witness an event of worldwide relevance. The square had an unexpected atmosphere. There were food vendors selling bread, souvlaki and coffee, and the ever-present stray dogs were lounging as if nothing out of the ordinary was occurring. Greek music was blaring, interspersed with protestors yelling over the speakers. I found myself directly in front of the Parliament building, less than five feet from a row of stoic Greek riot police. They each had full body armor, shields and gas masks at the ready. A few Greeks approached the line of officers and screamed insults at them with particularly incendiary Greek insults. The mood of the crowd became uneasy as rows and rows of protesters filed into the square. I noticed everyone around me had some kind of face coverage, whether it was a scarf or a painter’s mask, in anticipation of tear gas exposure. Some sprayed their own faces with a white mixture of Maalox and water to combat the gas, giving much of the crowd the appearance of a child dressed as a vampire on Halloween. People carried signs and chanted. Eventually, a couple of my friends and I felt like a taste of America and got lunch at a nearby McDonald’s, indoors and in view of the ongoing protest. The protest turned out to be uneventful, as the crowd gradually dispersed without any violent skirmishes. The same could not be said Sunday night, unfortunately. Greek Parliament voted to approve the austerity measures, and Syntagma Square erupted into violence. Luckily I stayed away from the square that day, but the explosions of Molotov cocktails and stun grenades could be heard from Pangrati, the neighborhood where I am living as a student this semester. Many followers of current events might believe everyone present at the protests is ready and willing to destroy their city and throw rocks at police. Relatively small factions of people are present at the demonstrations that make it their mission to start violence, and once they do, the crowd descends into chaos. Further, these potential riots are by no means spontaneous. The more volatile demonstrations are planned in advance and are avoidable for those wanting to stay away. On Monday, my teachers were absolutely devastated by the damage done to their city square, where flames consumed at least three historic buildings. The Greeks are a very proud people, who are profoundly dissatisfied with their government and crippled by harsh austerity measures. Although recent measures prevented Greece from defaulting on its loans, the future of the country’s government is anything but certain.last_img read more

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Teach for America ranks ND highly

first_imgFor the fourth time in the past five years, Notre Dame ranked among the top colleges and universities contributing graduates to Teach for America’s newest class of teachers. Teach for America (TFA), a nonprofit organization that recruits college graduates and professionals to teach in underserved neighborhoods and schools, issued a press release ranking the schools that sent the most graduates into the 2012 Teaching Corps according to three categories: large, medium and small schools.b Notre Dame ranked 12th among medium-sized schools after 27 members of the class of 2012 joined TFA’s ranks of teachers. Gaby Barahona, TFA’s manager of regional communications, said some schools send more graduates to the program than others for a variety of reasons. “It hinges on a few things, like how well TFA is known on campus or what the leaders on campus decide to do after their undergrad career,” she said. “I think it has to do with what our presence looks like. Do we have active recruiters on campus trying to engage the top leaders?” Northwestern University, Harvard University and Georgetown University ranked in the top three spots respectively for medium schools, which are defined as those with between 3,000 and 9,999 undergraduates. The high numbers of Notre Dame students who have entered the TFA Teaching Corps may assist future University applicants because it brings a greater familiarity with the organization to campus, Barahona said. “You might have friends who have done it, and you know their experiences and have a stronger knowledge base of what TFA is and what they look for,” she said. “It doesn’t necessarily give you an edge, but it helps inform the decision making and application.” TFA attracts exemplary college graduates and professionals to apply each year, Barahona said, and the process is very competitive. This year, the program received over 48,000 applications and accepted 5,800 teachers, a 17 percent acceptance rate. Brittany Scherer, class of 2012, was one of the lucky 17 percent to join the TFA 2012 Teaching Corps as a teacher of eighth grade reading and literature at Arlington High School in Indianapolis. “I love it,” Scherer said of her teaching job. “I never thought I wanted to be a teacher, but I’ve been in school for about a month so far and I absolutely love it.” Scherer said she decided to apply to the program after she participated in a Summer Service Learning Project involved with education. “I saw the achievement gaps firsthand with eight-year-olds,” Scherer said. “If the problem was starting with eight-year-olds, I couldn’t imagine what it was like for 12th graders, so I knew I wanted to work with an organization that fights that gap.” Many Notre Dame graduates choose to join TFA because of the value of service the University instills in its students, Scherer said. “It’s one of the main reasons I knew I wanted to do something with my life in service to others,” she said. “I think a lot of students at Notre Dame realize how blessed they are to be there, and it makes you realize how important it is that you use this gift to serve others.” For future TFA applicants, Scherer said the organization emphasizes the well-rounded individual, one who not only does well academically, but also has demonstrated extracurricular involvement and leadership qualities. Barahona also said leadership is a crucial quality for a TFA application, as well as individuality and passion. “What are the leadership qualities you bring to the table?”What have you done on campus to set yourself apart?” she said. “Going through those questions can help you figure out if you’re compatible for TFA.”last_img read more

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Legacy campaign raises funds

first_imgNotre Dame’s Class of 2013 will make a collective donation back to the University through the annual Senior Legacy Campaign. The Senior Legacy 2013 aims to give the class the “opportunity to bridge the gap between [their] experience as students and [their] plan to give back to the University after graduation,” according to the campaign’s website. Senior Mia Genereux, campaign co-chair, said student appreciation lies at the heart of the effort. “It is our way of showing gratitude for our time here, as well as stepping into our new role as Notre Dame alumni,” Genereux said. The campaign this year will donate its collections toward financial aid scholarships for University students, Genereux said. “Through establishing the Class of 2013 needs-based scholarship fund, we will be supporting future students for whom a Notre Dame education would otherwise be financially out of reach,” she said. Genereux said the senior class participation and amount of collected donations have been lower than usual, likely because students were only asked to make a one-time donation via a mass mailing system. Genereux said she hopes the implementation of a “three-year pledge” will engage greater participation from future alumni. “We want to improve senior class participation as well as young alumni participation rates through a revamped campaign, which includes a three-year pledge and a peer outreach system,” Genereux said. “Seniors can pledge to give back in the next three years at various levels of giving.” Senior Daniel Leicht, the other campaign co-chair, said he also believes this long-term plan will facilitate participation and donations. “We are confident that this pledge system will help seniors develop a long-term plan to give back to the University, keeping them engaged over a number of years rather than just the year that they graduate,” Leicht said. Additionally, the 2013 campaign hopes a peer invitation structure will help increase senior participation, Leicht said. “Each senior will be contacted by a fellow member of the class of 2013 to discuss the Senior Legacy and invite them to participate with a three-year pledge,” he said.   Genereux and Leicht said the goal is to have 75 percent of the senior class participate in the campaign this year. If they achieve at least 60 percent participation by the end of the school year, Leicht said the group will host a basketball tournament with “surprise celebrity emcees.” Leicht said he hopes interest and excitement for the scholarship fund will further encourage senior involvement. “[Through the scholarship fund], our class can provide the same opportunities to potential students that we have enjoyed in our time as students at this great University,” Leicht said. Contact Carolina Wilson at [email protected]last_img read more

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Prosecutor charges former SMC worker for voyeurism

first_imgAn email was sent to Saint Mary’s students Thursday morning providing updates on last week’s incident in which a maintenance worker was fired and arrested for allegedly observing students in the fourth floor restrooms of Le Mans Hall.According to the email on April 17, the prosecutor’s office formally charged David Summerfield, a former maintenance worker, with voyeurism and theft for stealing students’ clothing from a laundry room.On Monday, the Saint Joseph County Special Victims Unit (SVU) investigators, escorted by campus personnel, conducted an investigation of Le Mans’ attic and the private and community restrooms on the fourth floor. Police documented 21 holes in these locations. A female painter and a female maintenance worker then patched all of those holes.The email stated College personnel inspected all restrooms on campus, and female Building Services employees checked the bathrooms in the residence halls.Saint Mary’s President Carol Ann Mooney’s email said she hopes students feel more at ease knowing the situation was quickly resolved by the SVU, and the College took immediate and appropriate actions.“We notified all involved or potentially impacted and conducted a campus-wide inspection to identify and fix any areas of concern,” Mooney said in the email. “It was our intent to address this as quickly as humanly possible. Nothing is more important than the safety, security and privacy of our students, campus guests, faculty and staff.“This is a very troubling moment in Saint Mary’s 170-year history, but one man’s actions certainly does not mar the excellence of this institution, the faculty, our students and the staff.”Mooney asked students to remain vigilant and report anything that does not look or feel right to Campus Security (284-5000), Residence Life (284-4522) or a Resident Advisor. It is because of staff on campus that the issue came to light, Mooney said.“A vigilant employee helped surface this issue, and he is a wonderful example of what it means to be a part of the Saint Mary’s community, a community that cares about and looks out for each other,” she said.Tags: SMC, Summerfield, voyeurismlast_img read more

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Talk highlights racial differences on TV

first_imgEnglish professor Stuart Greene held an open discussion on the depiction of black love and family on television as part of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) lecture series for Black History Month on Thursday in O’Shaughnessy Hall. The series was co-sponsored by the NAACP, Africana Studies department, the Africana Studies student organization, Multicultural Student Programs and Services and the Gender Studies department.Junior Preston Igwe began the discussion by highlighting “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air” and the way in which the 1990s series defied typical stereotypes of black families, portraying each family member in a way that is “a lot more real and a lot more genuine.”Igwe said there is a stark contrast between the “stereotypical black son” and Carlton, the son on the show played by Alfonso Ribeiro.“There is the black son who is a lot of times angry, unintelligent, sex-crazed, and then you have Carlton who is a gentle young man who is funny and ambitious and is a hopeless romantic,” he said.One particular scene from the show that Igwe described depicts Phil, played by James Avery, as a compassionate and loving father-figure to his nephew played by Will Smith.“He let [his nephew] know it is okay to be vulnerable sometimes; it is okay to let it out; it is okay to be angry; it is okay to cry,” Igwe said. “We all need Uncle Phil in our lives. We all need to try to be that person in someone else’s life.“I think he is one of the best representations of how to be a good black father and a good black man.”Junior Ray’Von Jones said most other television shows featuring black characters depict them in a negative light. She addressed the negative ways in which television portrays black love and particularly sexuality by pointing to “Love & Hip Hop,” a television show on VH1.“It tells us that black love is dysfunctional,” Jones said. “If you watch these shows, you know that there are very few relationships in ‘Love & Hip Hop’ that are successful that go on without cheating and violence.”She said women are the ones who are particularly shown in an unfavorable way.“[According to the show] a black woman’s love and sexuality can be bought,” Jones said. “They portray women in a way that is overall negative in terms of a woman’s role in a black relationship. They portray women as angry; they portray women as [people who are] always going to go back to these men who are doing terrible things to them.”Junior Nora Williamson said she thinks it is easier for adults to recognize that these are negative depictions, but less so for younger audiences.“I remember watching things like [“Love & Hip Hop”] when I was 12, 13, 14, and I feel like it is especially formative on kids, regardless of race. But just watching this when you are little, and if you think that that’s what a relationship is like … that could be a real problem,” Williamson said.Tags: Black History Month, NAACP, Stuart Greenelast_img read more

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Students gather at Grotto to remember Fr. Hesburgh

first_imgWell after midnight in below-freezing cold, students stood in still silence around a glowing “TED” spelled out in candles at the Grotto to mourn the loss of Fr. Theodore “Ted” Hesburgh.Hesburgh died at 11:30 p.m. Thursday at the age of 97.“The Grotto is the only place to go at a time like right now,” senior Greg Denis said.More than 100 students gathered at the Grotto, standing, kneeling and huddled in groups praying. Every candle available was lit. The memory of Hesburgh provided warmth to the student body, freshman Emily Casey said.“It’s a testament to the Notre Dame community that there are so many people here at two in the morning on a Thursday night,” Casey said. “It doesn’t matter the weather or time of night, if something happens, the Notre Dame community is going to pull together and deal with this as a community.“I thought it was beautiful to see so many people out here for him. We were expecting some people but not as many.” Michael Yu | The Observer Candles illuminate The Grotto in memory of Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, who died Thursday at 97.Students standing arm-in-arm quietly and somberly broke into singing the Alma Mater.“When we came, people were starting to sing the Alma Mater, so we were able to join in,” freshman Therese McCarry said. “I think that was very special because everyone was coming together. People kept coming, lighting candles, saying prayers.”People reacted differently to the news of Hesburgh’s death, but all sought the comfort of the Notre Dame community at the Grotto, Brennah Toomey said.“It was a quieting of my mind,” Toomey said. “I felt at peace. Just seeing the word ‘TED’ written out in the candles was just beautiful.”Sophomore James Burke said he felt it was necessary to drop what he was doing to head to the Grotto.“I was studying at the time, and I heard that people were coming down to the Grotto,” Burke said. “I wanted to pay my respects and be part of that.”It was the most important thing to do at the time, sophomore Ben Evans said.“It’s a sign of respect for a guy who did so much for our community and University,” Evans said.A number of people were in tears and sought hugs from fellow students upon hearing the news, freshman McKenzie Brummond said.“I broke into tears when I found out,” Brummond said. “It kind of hit me like a train.”“I can already feel that the Notre Dame community is different without Fr. Hesburgh here. This will have such an impact on everyone who is even connected to the University.”McCarry said she felt sadness as well, knowing that a great man had died.“I wish I could have met him — very important person,” McCarry said. “I think I’m very aware of how this will affect everyone in the Notre Dame community. Not just students, but alums, teachers, everyone.”Sophomore Nick Lindstrom said he went to the Grotto to commemorate Hesburgh’s life and legacy.“Well, it’s tough because it’s not a sad thing,” Lindstrom said. “He lived such an amazing life and such a long life, I just wanted to come down and celebrate that.”Lindstrom said he met Hesburgh briefly during his first year at Notre Dame.“It was fall semester when I was still trying to figure out what I was doing here,” Lindstrom said. “I was walking up to the library, and I looked outside, and I said, ‘Hey, he looks familiar,’ and sure enough it was Father Hesburgh. So I walked up, and I was like, ‘I have to hold the door for this man.’ So I held the door for him, and he turned to me and said, ‘Thank you son.’ That was the only interaction I had and will only have with him, but that was enough for me.”It was fitting for the Notre Dame community to be at the Grotto remembering Hesburgh, Brummond said, because it was a gesture Hesburgh would have wanted to see.“It’s really inspiring to see everyone here because Fr. Hesburgh played such an instrumental role in building this community,” Brummond said. “So it’s amazing to see how loved he is by the community he really contributed to.”Some in the Notre Dame community knew Hesburgh’s health was wavering, so his death was not a complete surprise, Brummond said.“I’m in Fr. Malloy’s seminar, and he touched on Fr. Hesburgh’s state of health recently,” Brummond said. “I kind of knew it would be coming, but it came a little bit sooner than I expected.”Casey said she “knew Father Hesburgh’s death was coming,” but the loss still caught her off guard.“I don’t think you can ever prepare for anyone to go,” Casey said. “Especially someone who is so iconic. He is Notre Dame. You don’t imagine Notre Dame without him.”Female students particularly expressed their gratitude to Hesburgh, McCarry said, because female students were admitted during his tenure as University president in 1972.“When we were walking to the Grotto, I said, ‘We wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for Fr. Hesburgh. We’re here because of him,’” McCarry said. “I love Notre Dame, I love being here, and I couldn’t imagine being anywhere else, so I’m just really thankful because if it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t have this experience.”Casey echoed this sentiment.“Especially as a girl here at Notre Dame, I’m really appreciative of everything Fr. Hesburgh has done,” Casey said.Some were sorrowful at not being able to thank him for this historic change to the University, Brummond said.“[Women] really owe a lot to him,” Brummond said. “I just really wish I would have had the chance to thank him for the opportunity to even be here.”Fourth-year architecture student Caitlyn O’Malley said she felt remorse that she never got to meet Hesburgh.“I missed my one opportunity, and I’m never going to stop regretting it,” O’Malley said.  “He’s the reason I’m here.”Sophomore Nathan Luong said Hesburgh has had a role in all students’ lives at Notre Dame, whether they knew it or not.“He had a big impact here and for all of us students here, he affected our lives in one way or the other,” Luong said.Hesburgh was the most important person to Notre Dame’s community, O’Malley said.“He represents everything this University stands for,” O’Malley said. “He’s just one of those men. You don’t get many opportunities in your life to meet people like that. He’s just one of those people that stands out. We’re always going to remember the impact he had.”Freshman Patrick Keough said Hesburgh was more than just a man for Notre Dame.“He’s a symbol of the University,” Keough said. “He has led this University for many, many years and done amazing, terrific things for it.”Despite never meeting him, McCarry said Hesburgh’s fame and accomplishments will continue to be pervasive.“Very few people can have that kind of effect on others,” McCarry said. “He is a very special and important person.”Hesburgh was truly one of a kind, Denis said.“He’s a special man,” Denis said. “Not many people will ever come like that. He’s going to be missed on this campus and around the world.”Tags: Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, Grottolast_img read more

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Finance expert speaks to students

first_imgCuriosity, research and service are the main pillars of success, according to popular finance professional specialist Carl Ackermann.Rosie LoVoi Ackermann, who holds the Nolan Professorship for Excellence in Undergraduate Instruction, shared his experiences and advice Wednesday night in a speech titled “How to Have an Impactful Undergraduate Experience” for the second annual installment of the Sorin Scholars lecture series. The main purpose of Ackermann’s speech was to advise students on how to lead a fulfilling life in their academic field and how to be socially impactful.According to his biography on the Mendoza College of Business’s website, Ackermann “crusades against excessive fees in the investment industry, redirecting them to fight poverty and despair.” In 2012, Ackermann was named one of the top 10 business professors nationwide by Businessweek, the website said.The event was sponsored by the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE). Jeffrey Thibert, interim director and assistant director of national fellowships for CUSE, introduced Ackermann and talked about CUSE’s mission.“The mission of CUSE is to enable Notre Dame graduates to build on what they do in the classroom with activities outside the classroom,” Thibert said. “We want you ideally to see your undergraduate years as the beginning of a life’s work. You don’t have to wait until graduation to see positive change around you.”Ackermann began his lecture by talking about the importance of research through the lens of his own experience with research in a graduate program at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.“Being able to investigate a program from so many angles is unbelievably intellectually satisfying,” Ackermann said. “If you are interested in it, an exciting career at the forefront of discovery awaits you.”Ackermann said one of the most important tools to have, even in his field of finance, are developed, articulate writing skills.“Excellent writing is the key distinguisher in almost every field,” Ackermann said. “Turns out, almost everyone in the field can do the math, so it’s the people that can communicate the best that excel.”Ackermann went on to talk about how he thought one of the most admirable qualities Notre Dame students possessed was their commitment to service. He himself takes part in service by helping employees of local service organizations plan for their financial future, he said.“If you volunteer in the field of your professional expertise, you can magnify your potential in that field,” Ackermann said. “If you work in a field that traditionally does less service, like mine, you can actually have a lot of impact. … There’s a lot of low-hanging fruit where you can immediately improve the fortunes.”Ackermann encouraged students to utilize the resources available to them around campus such as the Career Center, the Writing Center and the Center for Social Concerns. He also said while in college, students should not neglect nutrition and personal finance.“Contrary to popular belief, beer, Kraft mac-and-cheese, Ramen noodles and Pop-Tarts are not the major food groups,” Ackermann said. “Learning how to eat right is important because it’s correlated to other behaviors. If you master personal finance in your early 20s, you can accumulate so much more than if you started in your 30s. By gaining command of your personal finances you’ll be able to accelerate and magnify your personal contribution.”Ackermann also stressed the importance of fun and well-being. Sometimes these areas can be overshadowed by the importance placed on academics, he said. In order to combat this, he said he maintains a daily goal to try and make one person’s day.He then told the audience to look under their seats. Under one person’s seat, Ackermann had taped a $20 bill for a student to keep.“Remember it’s easier to be fun and nice — it’s probably easier than being mean,” he said.Students should take more risks, Ackermann said, such as joining start-up companies with the knowledge that there is a high likelihood of failure or studying abroad in a country where they are do not know the language. Ackermann said the experience he felt he learned the most from was the time he worked as a soccer referee in an ethnically diverse neighborhood in Boston, where many of the players’ first language was not English.“There’s almost no risk to these experiences if you take them on now,” Ackermann said. “The times I’ve grown the most in life are when I’ve deliberately placed myself in uncomfortable situations. By being too closed, I’ve missed out on so many missed opportunities. Believe it or not, you’ll have more free time in college than you will at any other time in your life.”Tags: Carl Ackermann, CUSE, Sorin Scholars, undergraduate experiencelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon hosts Halloween Party for Riley Children’s Hospital

first_imgSaint Mary’s College Dance Marathon (SMC-DM) kicked off Halloween festivities Sunday by hosting a party for families of children being treated at Riley Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis.SMC-DM hosts an annual 12-hour event every year known as “Dance Marathon,” which is held to raise funds for Riley Children’s Hospital. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to stand on their feet for 12 hours in honor of the kids at Riley Hospital. The day features entertainment, food, dancing and performances.The next annual Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon will take place March 30 at the Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex, according to the event website. Throughout the year, SMC-DM hosts many fundraising events in anticipation of the day, including a 5K, Riley Week and the Halloween Party.An event several weeks in the making, the Halloween Party had Twister, “Mummy wrap” races and pumpkin painting. The Riley Family Outreach Committee took responsibility for reaching out to Riley families, setting up and planning out the day’s activities.“It is a great opportunity to meet the kids that we are fundraising for at Riley, and have fun doing it,” senior Madeleine Corcoran, executive for the Riley Family Outreach Committee, said.Families, kids and Dance Marathon members spent a few hours sharing in community and fellowship while raising money for the hospital. SMC-DM raised $125,425.48 for Riley Children’s Hospital this year, according to SMC-DM’s website. Since its creation, SMC-DM has raised $1,110,708.44, the website said.“I love the Riley families, it is always great to connect with them and see them,” Corcoran said.The event had a high turnout rate from both students and families, Corcoran said, a success she attributes to its location on Saint Mary’s campus.“Last year we held the party at the zoo, but moved back on campus this year,” she said.First-year Maddie Eckrich said she decided to join Dance Marathon and help with the Halloween Party because of her personal connections to Riley Children’s Hospital.“The best part of my day was getting to meet the kids and learn their stories and, most importantly, help kids feel like kids again,” Eckrich said. “There is nothing better than seeing the smiles on the kids’ faces.”Amy Newcomb, a mother of a Riley patient, shared how much the event resonated with her and her family.“It means a lot to see a network of individuals come together to honor kids that have been through so much and supporting a good cause,” Newcomb said. “It is moving to see how many people are here to support Riley Children’s Hospital, in an effort to keep research and funding alive to help the kid.”Tags: Halloween Party, Riley Children’s Hospital, Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon, SMC-DMlast_img read more

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Residence Hall Association hosts annual Trunk or Treat for local community

first_imgAnna Mason Rain brought students inside the Saint Mary’s Student Center to participate in the second annual Trunk or Treating.Trunk or Treat first came about after dorm trick-or-treating was canceled due to security concerns, senior business major and president of RHA Lucia O’Quinn said in an email.O’Quinn said RHA goes through an extensive planning process to ensure Trunk or Treat stays safe and fun.“The Exec Members start planning for it in mid-August (setting the time, date and renting the space in mid-summer/late spring) and the committee continues to work on it as soon as they have their first meeting in mid-September, as it is one of the first official RHA Events function of the semester,” O’Quinn said in the email.Various members of the Saint Mary’s community come together in the planning and execution of Trunk or Treat, she said.The Saint Mary’s administrative team, security department and student volunteers all play crucial roles in the process. The administrative team helps set the date and time, security ensures a safe environment and volunteers “help create a great experience for the children and families of the community,” O’Quinn said.In such a way, she said Trunk or Treat is a way to help raise student morale and offer a new way to give back.“After having the cancellation of the annual dorm trick-or-treating, many students and parents were saddened [by] not having that event to look forward to,” O’Quinn said. “We thought it would be a great way to bring back this event to the community in a safe environment, and to have the students give back to those who have given so much to help with our education and growth.”Other clubs participated in Trunk or Treat or held events to celebrate Halloween on the same day as Trunk or Treat. The Saint Mary’s Affiliates of the American Chemical Society (SMAACS) hosted their annual Halloween Spooktacular, and other clubs such as Belles Against Violence (BAVO), Circle K, Dance Marathon, Love Your Melon and the Little Sibs RHA Committee set up tables for trick-or-treaters.President of Circle K, junior Carina Garza, said Trunk or Treat presents a way to engage with the community.“It’s a chance for us to be able to have a connection,” Garza said. “Not only with faculty and staff in the area, but with the community as a whole and commuter students who can bring their families.”Garza stressed the importance of Trunk or Treat for the Saint Mary’s community as a whole.“Students in general don’t go out into the community unless they do service projects,” Garza said. “This is a chance for kids who don’t normally have the opportunity to come through the Saint Mary’s community and interact in a positive way.”Trunk or Treat is especially important for Circle K, she asserted.“It’s something that’s a collaboration of Saint Mary’s College and the community and that’s what we’re all about,” Garza said.O’Quinn said she has high hopes for the future of Trunk or Treat.“Personally, I would really love to keep this as an ongoing SMC tradition, as it helps foster a greater sense of community within SMC and the rest of the tri-campus collective,” O’Quinn said. “Last year we had an amazing turn-out for it being the first year. We hope to have the same turn-out if not more, and definitely hope to have more students attending. Many more students have volunteered to take part in the festivities this year and we are extremely grateful for that.”Tags: BAVO, Circle K, Dance Marathon, Halloween Spooktacular, Love your Melon, Resident’s Hall Association, SMAACS, trick-or-treating, Trunk or Treat The Saint Mary’s Residence Hall Association (RHA) hosted Trunk or Treat for the second year in a row on Wednesday, which allow local children an opportunity to trick-or-treat at student-decorated cars.The rain kept students confined to tables, where they passed out candy for the families of professors and students.last_img read more

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