PM, AG engaging in “juvenile antics” – Nandlall

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first_imgCarvil Duncan trial…accuses them of trying to convert judge from “victim to villain”Less than 24 hours after Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo requested that High Court Justice Franklyn Holder recuse himself from the Carvil Duncan case, former Attorney General (AG) Anil Nandlall has described the move as a plot that in effect “undermines” the tenets of democracy. In a letter to the judge, the Prime Minister asked him to remove himself from the case in light of the brewing tension with current AG Basil Williams over an incident at the last hearing back in March. But Nandlall, in a social media post on Sunday afternoon, pondered if he was now living in a “surreal world”, and even categorised the Prime Minister’s letter as a “scheme” formulated with the AG’s assistance to ensure that Williams does not apologise to the judge.“This letter is nothing short of a most comical and clumsy conspiracy hatched between the AG and the Prime Minister to avoid the AG apologising to Justice Franklyn Holder. As a lawyer, he (the PM) should have never lent himself to such a sleazy and senseless scheme. Imagine, the PM is asking the judge to recuse himself from the case essentially because the judge did not cite and jail the AG for contempt… Only intellectual giants like Williams and Nagamootoo can conceive such a “sophisticated” plot,” the former Legal Affairs Minister said is his strongly worded online post. It has further been claimed that the PM’s letter seeks to villainise the judge who, according to Nandlall, has been a victim of abuse. “It is that factual matrix which produces this bizarre letter which seeks to convert the judge, who is the victim of the abuse, into the villain! This can happen in no civilized country where there is rule of law and a system of democracy,” Nandlall expressed.Nandlall has also highlighted that the principle of separation of powers may be under threat. “These are two of the most senior functionaries of this Administration engaging in juvenile antics about a crucial state institution like the Judiciary…they now want to choose their own judge to hear their own case; [this is] a classic exhibition of authoritarianism. [It strikes] at the heart of the doctrine of separation of powers. Imagine if every litigant, on his own volition, decides to abuse the judge hearing his case and then claim the judge is biased…the Judiciary may not be able to sanction anyone for disrespecting its officers and processes in the future without being accused of hypocrisy and bias,” the former Attorney General pointed out.Duncan has moved to the court to block the work of a presidential tribunal set up to determine whether he should be removed from his post as Chairman of the Public Service Commission (PSC) in light of criminal charges proffered against him, one of which has since been dismissed at the Magistrate’s Court.Justice Holder complained to acting Chancellor, Yonette Cummings-Edwards, that during the March 23rd hearing of that case, he abruptly walked out of the courtroom as a result of statements made by the Attorney General.He quoted the AG as saying, “I could say what I want to say and however I want to say it, I have always been like that… The last magistrate who (told me what to do) was later found dead.”Justice Holder said in his complaint that he felt disrespected by the Attorney General’s behaviour, and he has called for an apology to be given him in open court before proceeding further with the case.However, the State’s chief legal advisor is holding out that he is not to be blamed for causing the High Court judge to walk out of the courtroom. He has also insisted that his comment was not a threat, even though Duncan’s defence lawyer, Anil Nandlall, has described it as such.In a letter dated May 4, 2017 and addressed to the Attorney General, Prime Minister Nagamootoo raised concerns about having a fair trial in light of the incident. “…due to an alleged incident between yourself and Justice Franklyn Holder in his Honour’s court on March 23, 2017 in the above mentioned suit, and His Honour’s subsequent petition to the Honourable Chancellor against the Attorney General on the issue of the alleged incident, I am of the opinion that neither the State nor I will receive fair hearing in the matter…,” the Prime Minister had stated.“Based on all the above mentioned grounds, I am of the opinion that I would be prejudiced in the suit because my attorney is barred from being heard in the matter. In view of the foregoing, therefore, I authorise you to request that the Honourable Mr Justice Holder recuse himself from further hearing the matter.”A copy of the petition has been forwarded to both the Chancellor of the Judiciary and Chief Justice, as well as President David Granger. However, the Office of the Chancellor had revealed that despite calling on AG Williams to officially explain his conduct, he is yet to respond.The continuation of the Carvil Duncan trial is scheduled for today (May 8).last_img

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first_imgTagsAndrew CuomoBill de BlasioNYC RestaurantsRetail Full Name* Multiple visits from multiple inspectors has led to major issues, according to restaurateurs who’ve been targeted — namely a lack of coordination between agencies, and little knowledge of what to look for when inspecting bars and restaurants.“The inspectors have become regulars with some,” said William Mack, a partner at the law firm Davidoff Hutcher and Citron, which works with restaurant owners. However, “restaurateurs that are in the same neighborhood or on the same block as some others, they’re not inspected at all or a dramatically different number of times.”Depending on the violation it receives, a restaurant may have its liquor license suspended, be forced to pay a fine or be temporarily shut down, all based on inspections by investigators who may never have worked with a restaurant prior to the pandemic.Investigators all have previous experience conducting these types of visits within their respective agencies and receive additional training, according to the SLA. Most inspections are the result of patrols, when investigators walk through designated areas of the city, which can result in multiple visits, the agency said.“While we understand the hardships bar and restaurant owners have faced during this crisis, we are still in a global public health emergency — and protecting New Yorkers must come first,” a spokesperson for the SLA said in a statement. “We will continue to take a smart approach to compliance.”But inconsistencies and unfair inspections happen “often,” according to liquor license lawyer Terrence Flynn, a founding partner of Flynn and Flynn.“If somebody is from the tax department, or the finance department, or DMV or wherever else they may be from, and they don’t deal hands-on with the hospitality industry, you cannot expect them to have the same experience as the State Liquor Authority or even the Department of Health,” Flynn said. “It is difficult for them to understand even what is necessary to make these businesses work.”Andrew Rigie, the executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance said that, at times, investigators have provided conflicting information during inspections.“For instance, one inspector will say something’s okay, then [the restaurant will] get a visit from another inspector saying something’s not okay, which creates enormous frustration, but also anxiety, fear and anger, because they’re trying to hang on for survival,” Rigie said.It becomes especially problematic as regulations can change quickly — in some cases within 24 hours.At Fat Buddha, a bar on Avenue A in Manhattan, investigators who visited on Oct. 14 observed “over twenty patrons standing, congregating and drinking directly in front of the business without facial coverings well past the 11 p.m. NYC curfew for outside dining,” the SLA claims.But the owner of the bar has a different story. The bar was in the process of closing when inspectors with the SLA and the police dropped by. A group of about five people was outside saying their goodbyes, while the manager of the bar closed up shop.But the group of people, along with a bottle of champagne one guest was holding — an unopened bottle that the bar doesn’t even sell — drew the inspectors’ attention. The agencies decided that the gathering qualified as a threat to public safety and suspended the establishment’s liquor license.“I do think it was unfair,” said Cliff Cho, Fat Buddha’s owner. “I just feel like the governor’s office is not going to really listen to us.”Even with the anxiety caused by the repeated inspections, many restaurants keep quiet due to fear of retaliation, according Ken Belkin, an attorney at Belkin Law.“It’s a nightmare,” Belkin said. “And the reality is these businesses are being hit with fines that they’re never going to be able to pay, because they’re barely hanging on as is.”Contact the author (iStock) On July 18 at around 4:30 p.m., Bungalow Bar in Rockaway Beach received a visit from the State Liquor Authority. Inspectors from the agency walked through the restaurant with its owners, told a guest to wear a mask when waiting for the bathroom and left. The inspectors didn’t find anything that warranted a citation.But two days later, the Department of Consumer Affairs came to do an inspection of the premises. The day after that, the Mayor’s Special Task Force paid Bungalow Bar a visit.Between that first visit and Aug. 25, Bungalow Bar was visited 11 times by inspectors from various city and state agencies, all conducting Covid-19 investigations. In some cases, the inspections happened daily.The restaurant was never written up for violating coronavirus-mandated safety protocols. Still, the visits were a major source of anxiety, according to owner Terence Tubridy.“I feel like we’re living in a world of prohibition,” Tubridy said.When the pandemic started, the SLA, the agency in charge of issuing liquor licenses, had just 30 investigators, according to data provided to The Real Deal by New York State. Prior to the pandemic, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was in charge of health inspections.But as the health crisis raged on, in an attempt to build up the number of bodies available to conduct inspections, the city and state decided to borrow personnel from a variety of government agencies, many of whom had never conducted restaurant inspections before.On the city side, officials from 15 agencies — from the Sheriff’s Department to the Department of Environmental Protection to the Taxi and Limousine Commission — were tapped to help out. On the state side, inspectors were brought in from the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Motor Vehicles, and the Department of Tax and Finance.Read moreEvolving outdoor dining regulations leave restaurants in the cold70 restaurants sue Cuomo over “Kafkaesque nightmare” of regulationsA tale of two logos: Restaurants in CA, NY battle over branding Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Email Address* Share via Shortlink Message*last_img

Celebrating The Vanderburgh County Bicentennial

first_img Celebrating The Vanderburgh County BicentennialJULY 6TH, 2018 ALEXIS BURKHART EVANSVILLE, INDIANAMost people can’t say they celebrate their birthday longer than a day, but when it’s a 200th birthday the circumstances change.People from Vanderburgh County were out celebrating the 200th birthday.County commissioners want to celebrate the big 200 all year long. Their latest event included live music, food trucks, inflatables, and ziplining.The birthday bash was held at the Old Courthouse as a part of their lunch on the lawn series which started back in May.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Long Lines for Black Friday

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