Top 10 Science colleges in India 2018

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first_imgScience is the most popular stream of study among the three primary academic streams, besides Commerce and Humanities. Science colleges open big and heavy doors for students to select from different career options-technical or non-technical.Hence without wasting time find all you need to know about the best science colleges in India in 2018 as per the India Today rankings.As the results are out now and universities and colleges across the country are releasing their cut-off lists, below is the list of top science colleges in India 2018. However, take note that admission to these top science colleges in India is not easy and even more difficult is making a decision in terms of the right college.1. Miranda HouseMiranda House, a residential college for women, is one of the premier women’s institutions of Delhi University. It was founded in 1948 by the then Vice-Chancellor Sir Maurice Gwyer, its foundation stone was laid by Lady Edwina Mountbatten. Miranda House offers liberal education in Humanities and Science to more than 2,500 students.2. Hindu CollegeThe college boasts of an accomplished faculty of about 120 members, and more than 2,000 students. The college is also proud of its efficient and very supportive non-academic staff. It offers a number of courses in the Sciences, Humanities and the Social Science streams.3. St. Stephen’s CollegeFounded on February 1, 1881, St. Stephen’s is the oldest college in Delhi. It was first affiliated to Calcutta University, and later to Punjab University. With the establishment of Delhi University in 1922, it became one of its three original constituent colleges.advertisement4. Kirori Mal CollegeKirori Mal College (KMC), established in 1954 is one of the premiere institutions of higher learning constituent to the University of Delhi, for all academic, administrative and extracurricular activity purposes.There are 21 undergraduate programmes including 15 honours courses in 19 Departments in the college. It is the only college in University of Delhi which offers BSc in Analytical Chemistry at the undergraduate level.5. Loyola CollegeLoyola College was founded by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) in 1925, with the primary objective of providing university education in a Christian atmosphere for deserving students, especially those belonging to the Catholic community. Although this college is meant primarily for Catholics, it admits other students irrespective of caste and creed.6. Madras Christian CollegeThe college was founded as a school in 1837. It is known as much for its academic standing and leadership building as it is for social commitment. Today, the college has more than 5,000 students and over 220 faculty members serving in 31 departments.7. Hansraj CollegeA premier institution,with highly qualified academicians imparting education in different fields, the college today enjoys a reputation for outstanding performance in academics, sports, and extra-curricular activities.8. Christ UniversityChrist University was formerly Christ College (Autonomous) affiliated to Bangalore University. Established in July 1969, Christ College is a premier educational institute of Bangalore. The college has an innovative and modern curriculum.9. Stella Maris CollegeBeginning in a small one-storey building on August 15, 1947, with 32 students, the college has at present over 3,000 students and in a large campus. The college became autonomous in 1987 and has 13 undergraduate and 12 post-graduate programmes.10. Lady Shri Ram College for WomenA centre for academic excellence and achievement, LSR is today one of the finest institutions for Social Sciences, Humanities and Commerce, while also offering a B.Sc. Programme in Statistics. Professional courses like Elementary Education and Journalism are among its strengths.Read: Here’s the list of top 10 Arts colleges in Indialast_img

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