JIS Gives Boys’ Home Facelift, Donates School Supplies

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first_imgStory Highlights Employees of the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) recently led a team of volunteers to conduct spruce-up activities at the Mount Olivet Boys’ Home in Walderston, Manchester, and assist in preparing the wards for the new school year. Employees of the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) recently led a team of volunteers to conduct spruce-up activities at the Mount Olivet Boys’ Home in Walderston, Manchester, and assist in preparing the wards for the new school year.Activities on the day included the painting of dorms, ironing of school uniforms and work in the vegetable garden.The wards were also given back-to-school packages comprising school bags, shoes, and other supplies.Among the volunteers were JIS summer employees, relatives and friends of staff, as well as sponsors and well-wishers.Assistant Director of the home, Kimberley Elliott, said the residents and staff were grateful for the assistance.“It was an amazing day; one that brought smiles to our faces and hearts,” she said.Home to 41 boys, Mount Olivet was adopted by the JIS in 2009, and remains the agency’s main corporate social responsibility project.Chief Executive Officer of the JIS, Donna-Marie Rowe, noted that the agency is always ready to provide support to the home.She hailed the commitment of staff to the project and expressed appreciation to the longstanding sponsors, while welcoming new supporters such as ABC Electrical.“Our sponsors share our vision for the children to attain their full potential, especially as we prepare them for back-to-school,” she noted.Sponsorship and Promotions Coordinator of JP Tropical Foods, Carol Rodriquez, said the entity continues to support the Mount Olivet Boys’ Home “because giving back is one of the policies of our (parent) company the Jamaica Producers Group”.“When you can actually see how what you’re giving is helping to motivate the boys, it also motivates you to continue to give back and visit the home,” she told JIS News.JIS summer employee in the Special Projects Department, Javan Orr, expressed pleasure at being able to participate in the visit.“It was a great experience to know that I was able to be a part of a project such as this, and to help in ensuring that the boys have items to go back to school,” he said.Sponsors of the visit were Sammy’s Shoe Store, ABC Electrical, the Jamaica Urban Transit Company (JUTC), and a private poultry farm in Clarendon. JIS summer employee in the Special Projects Department, Javan Orr, expressed pleasure at being able to participate in the visit. The wards were also given back-to-school packages comprising school bags, shoes, and other supplies. last_img

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