Numbers on energy industry growth climate commitments dont add up report

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by The Canadian Press Posted Jun 2, 2016 12:29 pm MDT Last Updated Jun 2, 2016 at 3:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Numbers on energy industry growth, climate commitments don’t add up: report EDMONTON – Canada can’t reach growth projections for the energy industry as well as meet its greenhouse gas commitments without damaging the rest of the economy, a study suggests.David Hughes, former research director at the Geological Survey of Canada, says other industries will have to reduce emissions by huge margins if Canada tries to expand oilsands and LNG exports while living up to the climate change promises it made in Paris.“If you factor in the expansion that’s planned in oil and gas production, it’s pretty difficult to see how you can cut the rest of the economy’s emissions by 55 per cent without destroying the economy in the process,” he said.Hughes, who did the study for the University of Victoria, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the University of Alberta’s Parkland Institute, also questions whether Canada needs new pipelines to move oilsands products to coastal terminals to get the best price for them.An industry spokesman said Hughes relied on out-of-date information and didn’t account for innovation.Hughes combined National Energy Board growth projections with the Alberta government’s cap on oilsands emissions and British Columbia’s plans for up to five new liquefied natural gas terminals to determine how much greenhouse gas the sector would release.He compared that with targets Canada agreed to at the Paris climate summit last December. The government promised a 30 per cent reduction from 2005 levels by 2030.Hughes found that the energy industry’s share of Canada’s total emissions would double to 52 from 26 per cent. That means other parts of the economy would have to pick up the slack.More than three-quarters of electrical generation is already emissions-free. Switching Canada’s stock of cars, trucks, homes and offices to low-carbon alternatives is expensive and would take decades.Extra emissions cuts from manufacturing or agriculture would have its own economic impacts.“Barring an economic collapse, therefore, Canada will have to reconsider its planned oil and gas production growth and demand real emissions reductions from the oil and gas sector in order to have any hope of meeting its … commitment,” Hughes writes.Alex Ferguson, a vice-president of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, said technological change in the oilsands is likely to prove Hughes’s assumptions wrong.“You’re going to see something in the next three, four, five years or so in terms of proving some of that out,” he said. “We, collectively, need to make a conscious bet that technology is going to help us in this challenge.”Hughes also argues against the need for new pipelines.He assumed oilsands production will be limited by Alberta’s 100-megatonne emissions cap and compared that with industry figures on pipeline and rail capacity. He found current infrastructure meets needs with a 15 per cent cushion.As well, the difference between the world oil price and what Alberta gets has been shrinking and was barely a dollar a barrel on Wednesday.“The reason for (the price differential) has been eliminated, so it’s unlikely that differential will resume.”Ferguson disputed both statements.Upcoming estimates of oil production will clearly show new pipelines are needed, he said.“What you’ll see from us soon is more up-to-date information and data that would certainly tell us we need more pipeline capacity.”As well, he said, a pipeline to the coast would allow Canada to take advantage of markets specifically looking for heavier crude.The International Energy Agency says the world will still need 67 million barrels of oil a day by 2040.“Why wouldn’t we want Canada to have a reasonable share of that demand?” Ferguson asked.Hughes agreed oil will be in the energy mix for a long time. The point, he said, is that Canada faces tough choices and serious challenges.“Industry will probably say there will be a silver-bullet solution. I think it’s unlikely and we better do the math with the figures we have and put that long-term plan together.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960

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Opinion: budget boost must benefit businesses

first_imgSkills minister John Healeysupports the Chancellor’s decision to inject more money into IIP and claims itis vital for increasing staff productivity There is no clearer sign ofthis Government’s backing for Investors in People than the extra funds announcedby the Chancellor during his Budget statement. He said: “I can today respondto joint work by the CBI and TUC by announcing an additional £30m so morebusinesses can reach Investors in People standards.” This new money the Governmentis pumping in will be used to encourage take-up of the Standard within smallfirms and should answer critics in the business community who may have doubtedits commitment to the Investors in People Standard.The money in the Budget is ontop of the £2.5m already allocated this year to raise the profile and boost thedelivery of Investors in People in the shorter term (News, 9 April). And thenumber of companies committing to working towards the Standard is on the upagain – nearly 2,100 organisations in the four months to January this year,almost back to the levels of the same period in the previous year (2,400). Andwe can expect Investors in People recognitions to rise accordingly.However, I want to put aspecial emphasis on increasing the number of small businesses achieving theInvestors in People Standard. They employ 44 per cent of the country’sworkforce but less than 1 per cent are working towards IIP status. I realisethat the smaller the company, the harder it often is to find the time, moneyand expertise to invest in your workforce. But the Standard can bringbenefits to any size of firm and must be made available to all. The new moneywill directly benefit firms employing less than 50 people through measures suchas the development of beacon status businesses. These beacons will spur otherbusinesses to follow in their footsteps and achieve Investors in Peoplerecognition through a mentoring and support programme. Clear targets will alsobe set so that the improvement in uptake is transparent and reflects the sizeof the investment.Why am I such a strongsupporter of the Standard? Because the bottom line is that it works. Investorsin People is the best workforce and business development standard we have.Employers with Investors in People status recognise that success in businessescomes from a motivated and well-trained workforce – as the 25,000 who havereceived the standard during its first decade will testify.In a recent study, 73 per centof IIP companies surveyed said that it helped them to meet their businessobjectives. Half reported a positive impact on business growth or performance.More than half said they had seen customer satisfaction improve. By the end of this year we want45 per cent of organisations in England with more than 50 employees recognisedas Investors in People, and an additional 10,000 smaller organisations. We mustmeet these targets and move well beyond them in future years.More than a third of UKemployees now work for a  company thateither has or is working towards the standard. But if we want to raise theskills levels of our workforce to match the best in the world by 2010,mobilising more employers – large and small – must be our priority. Raising skills levels isessential to our economic growth. Firms with higher levels of training havehigher productivity. The challenge we face is to embed workforce training anddevelopment in all businesses large and small – and Investors in People has acentral role to play in this. John Healey is Education andSkills Ministerwww.investorsinpeople.co.uk Related posts:No related photos. Opinion: budget boost must benefit businessesOn 30 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img

USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport Authorities November 17, 2014 View post tag: NS Mayport View post tag: USS Farragut The guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) held a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 14.Cmdr. Cory R. Applebee relieved Cmdr. William Musser as Farragut’s commanding officer.After serving as Farragut’s executive officer during her deployment with the USS Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group, Musser assumed command in May, 2013. He completed a tour overseeing the ships post-deployment maintenance availability, a highly dynamic and compressed basic phase, an Inspection and Survey, and several multi-ship exercises.For his next tour, Musser will report to Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) in Fallon, Nevada as the Department Head for Tomahawk Missile Tactics and Training.Guest speaker, Capt. Ryan Tillotson, Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 14, praised Musser for his successful tour onboard Farragut.Applebee graduated from the University of Kansas and was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer’s Training Program in January, 1996. He completed sea tours aboard USS Mount Hood (AE-29), USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13), USS Simpson (FFG 56), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and USS Underwood (FFG 36). Applebee’s shore assignments include serving as a NROTC instructor at the University of Kansas and Deputy Battle Watch Commander and the Current Operations Branch Chief during his joint tour at the United States Strategic Command. He earned his Master’s Degree in Human Resource Management from Webster University.His awards include the Joint Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, various unit and campaign awards.Farragut is preparing for her 2015 deployment with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group.[mappress mapid=”14450″]Press release, Image: US Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: americascenter_img View post tag: changes Share this article View post tag: News by topic USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport View post tag: Command View post tag: Navylast_img

Tri-State Treasure: The Veterans Memorial Coliseum

first_imgMARCH 8TH, 2019 TOMMY MASON EVANSVILLE, INDIANAFrom basketball to big musical performers to bingo and even body slams Evansville’s Veterans Memorial Coliseum has hosted a wide range of events since its dedication in 1917. The 6,600 square foot limestone building was officially known as the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Coliseum after construction in memory of those who served in the Civil War and the Spanish American War.After the completion of what is now the Old National Events Plaza in the early ’70s, Vanderburgh County officials had no use for the aging structure.General Manager Andrea Stafford says a new generation of veterans would soon be tasked with preserving the monument for many years to come.“Veterans Council said please let us take it over. We’ll maintain it. We’ll keep it open. We keep it running. So, they did. They took it over in 1971. They pay a dollar a year,” says Stafford.On average, the Coliseum hosts 75 events per year. In the 1970s and 80s regional pro wrestling promotions like the continental wrestling association.Stafford shares some of the big-name grapplers who jerked the curtain at the Coliseum.“Jerry Lawler, Bill Dundee, Dutchman Tell, Stone Cold Steve Austin, the Rock, and the Undertaker. A lot of them actually got their start here,” says Stafford.And the list goes on with some of the most compelling live broadcasts shot in the bowels of the building.Stafford says there’s another show happen in those halls now. “We have some celebrities downstairs too. I don’t know if people have died in the building or they have an attachment to it. There is some spooks downstairs,” says Stafford.Stafford describes one of those spirits as a dark entity. That cell is part of a network of tunnels connecting it to the old jail and the old courthouse where prisoners would be transported.Those passages have since been sealed. The 4000-seat coliseum would later play host to the Evansville College Purple Aces basketball team before relocating to Roberts Municipal Stadium in 1950.Although, the event calendar has become a bit thinner in the 21st century the spirit of those veterans and the monument they allow us to enjoy makes this a must see Tri-State Treasure.Comments0 commentsFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

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