Commentary Covering mens tennis shows hope in otherwise scandalridden sports world

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Stop what you are doing. Turn on ESPN. What do you see? A slew of NCAA sanctions, fake girlfriends, falsification of academic records and abusive coaches chucking basketballs at players’ heads floods the screen. It is enough to make even the most extreme college sports fan sit down and do some soul-searching about the future of their fandom. Admittedly, I myself fell victim to this epidemic. A lifelong college sports die-hard, I had to actively avoid watching collegiate sports through the lens of a bitter skeptic – just waiting for the next story to break that sends the program, the player or the coach toppling. The sanctity of college sports for me was dying, and dying fast. Fortunately, the road back to the former glory of my fandom began this semester, although it started off with Ohio State redshirt junior Peter Kobelt almost hospitalizing me with a 130 mph tennis serve. When I was assigned to write for the OSU men’s tennis team for The Lantern at the start of Spring Semester, I fought mixed feelings. I was excited to be steering clear of football and basketball, hopefully sparing myself from the possibility of uncovering anything that would crush the remaining Buckeye fan in me, but I was nervous to be covering a sport that I knew as much about as my seventh grade gym class had taught me. My first day on the job consisted of getting lost on the way to a building I’d never heard of and arrived 20 minutes late. Flustered, I entered practice, and was greeted by Kobelt’s serve grazing my right arm. This game was already much more intense than I had expected. My first interview that day with coach Ty Tucker was ill-prepared and probably full of questions that a seventh grade student in gym class would ask about the game of tennis. I wonder why. Honestly, it’s nothing short of a miracle that the team entrusted me to report on their season after that day. More than three months later, the tennis team is in the tail end of its regular season. As a sports reporter, I have grown immensely during that time. I now can say with confidence that I can accurately comprehend the scoreboard at a tennis match. But I’ve also learned a few other things. The players on the OSU men’s tennis team love what they do, and they do it well: Tucker has coached the Buckeyes to seven consecutive Big Ten regular season titles, six more Big Ten tournament crowns and a decade-long home win streak (which, by the way, is the longest home win streak in NCAA sports), and has barely made a peep about it. If I were not badgering him with questions all semester long, I am pretty sure he would not talk about it at all. The humility he emulates trickles down to his players. These guys are here to play tennis, and it shows. The players love each other, too: It took me a while to realize, but the tennis team is comprised of the most random assortment of players ever. There are four international players on the 11-man roster. To the naked, untrained eye, you would think the men had known each other their entire lives, and not just during their time at OSU. Their chemistry off the court is equally, if not more obvious and impressive, than when they are on the court. The players use their game to capture what’s special about collegiate sports: This is my favorite part. On Friday, when the team captured its 164th straight home victory and officially went 10 years without a home loss, the celebration that followed was what many would consider uneventful. There was no confetti falling from the ceiling or camera flashbulbs firing, but what there was were a group a college kids running around, laughing and throwing arms around each other while their head coach smirked at them off to the side. Several fans cheered in the bleachers, but they were mostly parents of players. The energy in the room, though, was contagious – even palpable. The players were ecstatic, and they didn’t need a fat paycheck or swarm of media attention to evoke it. Maybe it’s just me, but that’s what a college sports team should be at its core. It’s what I now believe many teams at many schools across the country must look like. It just took a lesser-publicized sport, men’s tennis, to remind me of that. Consider my faith in college athletics restored.

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USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport Authorities November 17, 2014 View post tag: NS Mayport View post tag: USS Farragut The guided-missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) held a change of command ceremony at Naval Station Mayport Nov. 14.Cmdr. Cory R. Applebee relieved Cmdr. William Musser as Farragut’s commanding officer.After serving as Farragut’s executive officer during her deployment with the USS Eisenhower (CVN 69) Carrier Strike Group, Musser assumed command in May, 2013. He completed a tour overseeing the ships post-deployment maintenance availability, a highly dynamic and compressed basic phase, an Inspection and Survey, and several multi-ship exercises.For his next tour, Musser will report to Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) in Fallon, Nevada as the Department Head for Tomahawk Missile Tactics and Training.Guest speaker, Capt. Ryan Tillotson, Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 14, praised Musser for his successful tour onboard Farragut.Applebee graduated from the University of Kansas and was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer’s Training Program in January, 1996. He completed sea tours aboard USS Mount Hood (AE-29), USS Samuel Eliot Morison (FFG-13), USS Simpson (FFG 56), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), and USS Underwood (FFG 36). Applebee’s shore assignments include serving as a NROTC instructor at the University of Kansas and Deputy Battle Watch Commander and the Current Operations Branch Chief during his joint tour at the United States Strategic Command. He earned his Master’s Degree in Human Resource Management from Webster University.His awards include the Joint Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, various unit and campaign awards.Farragut is preparing for her 2015 deployment with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group.[mappress mapid=”14450″]Press release, Image: US Navy View post tag: Naval View post tag: americascenter_img View post tag: changes Share this article View post tag: News by topic USS Farragut Changes Command at NS Mayport View post tag: Command View post tag: Navylast_img

Tri-State Treasure: The Veterans Memorial Coliseum

first_imgMARCH 8TH, 2019 TOMMY MASON EVANSVILLE, INDIANAFrom basketball to big musical performers to bingo and even body slams Evansville’s Veterans Memorial Coliseum has hosted a wide range of events since its dedication in 1917. The 6,600 square foot limestone building was officially known as the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Coliseum after construction in memory of those who served in the Civil War and the Spanish American War.After the completion of what is now the Old National Events Plaza in the early ’70s, Vanderburgh County officials had no use for the aging structure.General Manager Andrea Stafford says a new generation of veterans would soon be tasked with preserving the monument for many years to come.“Veterans Council said please let us take it over. We’ll maintain it. We’ll keep it open. We keep it running. So, they did. They took it over in 1971. They pay a dollar a year,” says Stafford.On average, the Coliseum hosts 75 events per year. In the 1970s and 80s regional pro wrestling promotions like the continental wrestling association.Stafford shares some of the big-name grapplers who jerked the curtain at the Coliseum.“Jerry Lawler, Bill Dundee, Dutchman Tell, Stone Cold Steve Austin, the Rock, and the Undertaker. A lot of them actually got their start here,” says Stafford.And the list goes on with some of the most compelling live broadcasts shot in the bowels of the building.Stafford says there’s another show happen in those halls now. “We have some celebrities downstairs too. I don’t know if people have died in the building or they have an attachment to it. There is some spooks downstairs,” says Stafford.Stafford describes one of those spirits as a dark entity. That cell is part of a network of tunnels connecting it to the old jail and the old courthouse where prisoners would be transported.Those passages have since been sealed. The 4000-seat coliseum would later play host to the Evansville College Purple Aces basketball team before relocating to Roberts Municipal Stadium in 1950.Although, the event calendar has become a bit thinner in the 21st century the spirit of those veterans and the monument they allow us to enjoy makes this a must see Tri-State Treasure.Comments0 commentsFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Get your tax return filed in good time

first_imgBakers are being urged to beat the New Year rush and file their tax return before 31 January or face a £100 fine.Self assessment tax returns have to be filed online at hmrc.gov.uk/online/index.htm and, if submitting it electronically for the first time, companies will need to register; an activation code can take up to seven working days to arrive.The self assessment online service is available 24 hours a day, with the quietest time to use it between 5pm and 8am, Monday to Friday. You will need to provide details of business accounts for the tax year ended 5 April 2010, such as spreadsheets of income and expenditure, bank and credit card statements, and invoices from customers and expenses receipts. Details of any other income, such as interest on bank and building society accounts or income from stocks and shares, need to be given too.Visit hmrc.gov.uk/sa or call the self assessment helpline on 0845 900 0444.last_img

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