Bryan Redpath removed as Director of Rugby at Sale Sharks

first_imgSale take on 11th placed London Irish on Friday night in what was already a must-win clash given there is already an eight point gap between themselves and safety.Follow Ben Coles on Twitter @bencoles_ LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS SALFORD, ENGLAND – SEPTEMBER 8: Bryan Redpath, Director of Rugby at Sale Sharks, during the warm up before the Aviva Premiership match between Sale Sharks and Saracens at the Salford City Stadium on September 8, 2012 in Salford, England. (Photo by Paul Thomas/Getty Images) But the club have struggled in the Aviva Premiership, losing all of their first seven matches of the new season, with the latest defeat coming on Friday night away to Worcester.Redpath’s previous stint with Gloucester finished with a run of six consecutive defeats, meaning that he has lost his last 13 matches in the Aviva Premiership as a Director of Rugby. Sale also dismissed forwards coach Steve Scott earlier in the season, with Diamond taking over the coaching of the pack.Mitchell has been heavily linked with the club in recent weeks and watched Sale during their defeat to Montpellier two weeks ago in the Heineken Cup. However, he is still contracted to the Lions in South Africa, despite his suspension after several fallouts with his players over his management style. by Ben ColesBRYAN REDPATH has been removed as Director of Rugby at Sale Sharks, with chief executive Steve Diamond taking charge of all coaching matters for the remainder of the season.John Mitchell is expected to join the club as a consultant in the coming weeks and has given his input towards selection for Friday’s match against London Irish.Redpath has been offered the backs coaching job at the club and has been given two days to accept or move on. Mitchell is currently back in South Africa finalising the release of his contract from the Golden Lions, who suspended him earlier in the year.The former Scotland scrum-half was hired over the summer after a truncated, and controversial departure from Gloucester at the end of last season. Redpath was charged with leading Sale into a shiny new era at the new Salford City Stadium and Sale recruited heavily over the summer, bringing in marquee players such as Richie Gray and Danny Cipriani.last_img read more

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Six / Sebastian Mariscal Studio

first_imgArchitects: Sebastian Mariscal Studio Area Area of this architecture project 2007 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/47235/six-sebastian-mariscal-studio Clipboard Area:  1546 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Photographs Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/47235/six-sebastian-mariscal-studio Clipboard Save this picture!© Hisao Suzuki+ 14 Share CopyLoft•La Jolla, United States Projects Photographs:  Hisao Suzuki Text description provided by the architects. Conceived as a series of town residences, SIX in La Jolla combines clear form with continuous indoor/outdoor spaces, elevating to the views of the Pacific Ocean. Stepping down the sloped site, the six town homes create a visual rhythm of contrasting volumes and projecting balconies, extending towards the ocean views. Front patios, defined with greenery, filter the street and lead to the main living/dining/kitchen spaces where full height sliding glass panels open the space completely to the exterior, creating a continuous outdoor experience. Floating above are the IPE wood clad boxes that house the bedrooms and screen the private decks, alternating with the light stone volumes that define circulation and service spaces. The protruding stainless steel viewing balconies accent the sunset washed street facades, set against the Southern California sky.Save this picture!© Hisao SuzukiRecommended ProductsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteCurtain WallsIsland Exterior FabricatorsQuay Tower Curtainwall SystemDoorsAir-LuxPivoting DoorSebastian Mariscal Studio has been slowly building a portfolio of well-regarded contemporary housing projects throughout the city of San Diego. Their latest is Six, a row-house project just a block from the beach in La Jolla, one of San Diego’s most desirable and expensive neighborhoods. As with all of these projects, Mariscal is the developer, architect, and contractor.Save this picture!ground floor planSix sits on a sloping lot on a curving street, a topographic condition made subtly evident as the apparently identical units curve and drop with the terrain. The row-houses sit atop an underground garage accessible from the side street on the low side of the site; they address the sidewalk through a small gate in a hedge that provides privacy to the open units beyond. Save this picture!© Hisao SuzukiEach row-house is composed of two parts that are expressed in their finish materials. Service elements (stairs, elevators, storage, and the like) are placed in limestone-clad pylons that act as sound gaskets between the units. All living spaces are contained in wood boxes that bridge between the stone pylons. The wood boxes—clad completely in IPE—contain bedrooms at the second and third floors. Under the wood box, a large loft-like space for the kitchen and living areas extends into gardens on both ends. This connection is made seamless by the use of fold-away glass doors that completely open both ends of the room. IPE flooring runs outside as decking in both directions, connecting the garden and terrace areas to the interior. In fact, this “slipping” of inside to out is so effective that, when the doors are folded back, you feel as though you are in a covered exterior space. Six is a quintessentially Southern California housing scheme that builds on a legacy of seamless connections between house and garden. The real genius of Six is that it accomplishes this with such a deceptively simple kit-of-parts.Save this picture!© Hisao SuzukiProject gallerySee allShow lessArchitecture Therapeutics Aesthetics ConferenceArticlesMore on Pole Dance, SO-IL’s winning entry for the P.S.1ArticlesProject locationAddress:La Jolla, California, USALocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Six / Sebastian Mariscal Studio Six / Sebastian Mariscal StudioSave this projectSaveSix / Sebastian Mariscal Studio “COPY” ArchDaily Loft United States CopyAbout this officeSebastian Mariscal StudioOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingLoftDabasLa JollaHousing3D ModelingUnited StatesPublished on January 24, 2010Cite: “Six / Sebastian Mariscal Studio” 24 Jan 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 12 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Talis SVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Solid ColorPartitionsSkyfoldRetractable Walls – Stepped & Sloped SpacesDining tablesZeitraumWood Table – TautBathroom AccessoriesBradley Corporation USARoll Towel Dispenser – Electronic TouchlessWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesAluminium CompositesSculptformClick-on Battens in Victoria GardensMetal PanelsLongboard®Metal Ceilings – DauntlessWoodStructureCraftEngineering – Mass TimberPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsPerforated Facade PanelFiber Cements / CementsDuctal®Rainscreen Cladding Panels for Lightweight Facades in Apartment BlockBricksAcme BrickModular Size BrickMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?六建筑 / Sebastian Mariscal Studio是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Synode / mmArchitects

first_imgArchDaily Projects Photographs:  Lim Jaesun Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Structural Engineer:Choi SeokhyunM/E/P:Kyoungdo ENGCity:Gimpo-siCountry:South KoreaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Lim JaesunText description provided by the architects. The house is located in a new city overlooking the Han River and was first built in a residential area. The client is a young architectural sound expert who is a young couple with a 1-year-old baby and a single man. They wanted to purchase a piece of land in the new Han River city and plan two household and a five-meter-high recording room. They had experience in interior construction and had knowledge of construction, so the issues of design could usually be discussed by e-mail or telephone.Save this picture!Ground Floor PlanThey cared most about the communal courtyard and the large-scale studio space between the two houses for their future. The underground studio was used on a ground-wide scale, excluding legal restrictions, and a garden was planned between many visitors and parties. On the contrary, they wanted public space, garage, loft, and bike repair space for hobbies rather than residential space because of the small number of residents. Thus, the minimum residential space was considered and the design was approached from the relationship between the public sector and the external space outside.Save this picture!© Lim JaesunThe inner courtyard is closed from the outside by two masses and connected only by an alley to a neighbor and a pedestrian path. The ground is about one meter higher than the surrounding area and will be used as a meeting space for the two houses with grass and stone. The first floor of the two houses had rooms for guests and kitchens so they could serve in the inner yard, private spaces for privacy, and doors and windows were arranged without interference from each other.During the design process, we considered the following four issues:       1.-  How would you protect the privacy of two intimate families on a plot?       2.-  Three of the four sides of the site face the road, which is a violation of privacy.       3.-  How is the lighting and ventilation of the two houses?       4.-  How will we approach the relationship between the residential area?Save this picture!DiagramsFirst, the way two houses were arranged up and down or side by side, was not wanted by the client. The same housing requirements were required and wanted to be composed entirely of different units due to property rights. Secondly, the exterior walls of the house were bordered by three roads, which required blocking of vision from pedestrians. This raised the height of the first floor by one meter, and placed public(or semi-) spaces such as garage, living room, kitchen while increasing the location of windows and reducing the size.Save this picture!© Lim JaesunThus, various height differences were made within the site. Some of the ceiling in the basement recording room was naturally raised one meter above the ground, allowing ventilation and partial lighting. The front and the rear housing has been designed to facilitate lighting and ventilation to different heights and locations. And the non-light areas in the back were placed in the garage, bike repair space, and warehouse.Save this picture!© Lim JaesunAnd the most worrisome part was how the externally closed mass had the imagination of housing. The house faces inward around its courtyard, with no access to roads or sidewalks. Therefore, visitors must go through the alley to see the small yard and the two entrances. An alleyway leading to the courtyard wanted to connect with the housing complex, with the neighborhood, and to imagine many stories.  Imagine how children’s voices, the smell of delicious food, the conversation between neighbors, and the soft music would change over the alley.Save this picture!Section 1Save this picture!Section 4Project gallerySee allShow lessK.J. Somaiya College for Information Technology / Sameep Padora & AssociatesSelected ProjectsURSIDE Hotel & Café / URSIDESelected Projects Share “COPY” Chang Juhyun Synode / mmArchitects Lead Architects: South Korea CopyHouses, Refurbishment•Gimpo-si, South Korea ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/900613/synode-mmarchitects Clipboard Houses Photographs 2016 Synode / mmArchitectsSave this projectSaveSynode / mmArchitects Manufacturers: Alphacan, Tiger stone Save this picture!© Lim Jaesun+ 27Curated by María Francisca González Share Year:  Area:  149 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/900613/synode-mmarchitects Clipboard Architects: mmArchitects Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” CopyAbout this officemmArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsStoneConcreteBrick#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentGimpo-siSouth KoreaPublished on August 25, 2018Cite: “Synode / mmArchitects” 24 Aug 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceGlass3MSun Control Window Film in MarkthalSinkshansgroheBasin FaucetsPaintSTAC BONDComposite Panel Finishes – MetallicsConcreteKrytonConcrete Hardening – Hard-CemSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight FE PassivhausLightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenWindowsVEKAWindows – SOFTLINE 70 ADUrban ShadingPunto DesignPavilion – CUBEDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Hinged Door | AlbaWoodHESS TIMBERTimber – GLT BlockGreen FacadesSempergreenLiving Wall – SemperGreenwallMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Six people being questioned after attack on retired GPs Claudy home

first_img Google+ Pinterest Twitter PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Google+ By News Highland – September 15, 2011 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleLTC to address problems at dangerous Pearse Road junctionNext articleCope seeks appointment of administrator to MFG News Highland Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp WhatsApp Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme center_img Twitter Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released News Pinterest The retired GP whose Claudy home was targeted in a Real IRA bomb attack earlier yesterday morning says he and his wife have lived to serve their community, and will not be bullied into leaving it.A controlled explosion was carried out on the device found at Dr Keith Munro’s home early on Wednesday morning. Dr Munroe, one of the founders of the Foyle Hospice, carries out some work for the PSNI.In a second incident yesterday, a bomb went outside a Catholic police officer’s house on the Ervery Road near Claudy. No-one was injured.Four men and two women arrested yesterday are still being questioned. Six people being questioned after attack on retired GPs Claudy home HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Facebook Facebooklast_img read more

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Kerala High Court Directs State Government To Ensure Packaged Drinking Water, Ice Bars Meet Standards Prescribed Under Law

first_imgNews UpdatesKerala High Court Directs State Government To Ensure Packaged Drinking Water, Ice Bars Meet Standards Prescribed Under Law Lydia Suzanne Thomas14 April 2021 5:25 AMShare This – xAmong other reliefs, the petitioner sought a ban on ‘unhealthy juice’ kulukki sarbath.Early in March, the Kerala High Court closed Public Interest Litigation from 2014, which alleged the existence of unauthorised packaged drinking water units that bottled water and distributed ice bars without the required quality markers or licences. Chief Justice of the Kerala High Court Justice S Manikumar and Justice Shaji P Chaly constituted the Bench that disposed the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginEarly in March, the Kerala High Court closed Public Interest Litigation from 2014, which alleged the existence of unauthorised packaged drinking water units that bottled water and distributed ice bars without the required quality markers or licences. Chief Justice of the Kerala High Court Justice S Manikumar and Justice Shaji P Chaly constituted the Bench that disposed the petition. The Court directed the State Government to ensure that manufacturing units operated in line with statutory prescriptions. The Bench additionally urged the concerned statutory bodies to undertake periodical inspections to ensure units functioned after receiving the required consent/permit/licence. “Therefore, the writ petition is disposed of directing the respondents to ensure that unauthorised drinking water units are not functioning in the State and that the packaged drinking water units are functioning with licences and other permits and undertaking all precautions in accordance with law so as to meet up with the standards prescribed under law. The State Government shall also ensure that the low quality ice is not distributed by any of the manufacturing units so as to affect the public health.” The petitioner, Human Rights Mission, stating that the operation of these units harmed health as well as the ecology, primarily prayed that licences of these water units be verified and that the operation of those operating without license be stopped. Only those units that obtained an ISI mark and number should be allowed a licence, the petitioner additionally prayed. Apart from these, another relief sought by the petitioner was a ban on the sale of kulukki sarbath, a popular beverage available across the state. The petitioner stated that unauthorised water units distribute low quality ice bars which are used by wayside shopkeepers for making ‘kulukki sarbath’, which may cause serious diseases to human beings in future. Terming the beverage an ‘unhealthy juice’, the petitioner prayed for a direction prohibiting the sale of the drink. In Court, the State Government brought on record steps taken by the Government along with the Food Safety and Standards Act to ensure that the illegal functioning of packaged drinking water units. “The Bureau of Indian Standards, namely the 6th respondent, has clearly stated that it was making enquiries and taking steps against those industries which are not functioning in the field in question without securing the ISI marks and those units which are using the ISI marks unauthorisedly”, the court pointed out. Based on the submissions, the Court observed that steps were taken to prevent the illegal functioning of packaged drinking water unit. It would be appropriate to dispose of the petition with suitable directions especially since the reliefs sought were general in nature, the Court added. In addition to instructing the statutory authorities to undertake inspections and ensure packaged drinking water units were not functioning without authorisation, the Court said, “It is also directed that while granting licence to any new packaged drinking water units, necessary directions shall be issued to maintain the standards prescribed under the respective statutes and to ensure that such units starts functioning only after securing permits/clearances/consents from the respective statutory authorities” On these terms, the petition was disposed. CASE NAME: Human Rights Mission v. Director, Kerala State Ground Water Department COUNSEL: Advocate D Mini Rajan for the petitioner, Senior Government Pleader Surin George Ipe for the State Respondents, Standing Counsel Manoj Ramaswamy for the Bureau of Indian Standards, and Advocate TG Rajendran for Kairali Aqua, one of the respondent packaged water companies impleaded to the proceedings.Click here to download the judgmentSubscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Inside University of Illinois’ massive COVID-19 testing operation

first_imgstefanamer/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO and DR. JAY BHATT, ABC News(NEW YORK) — As schools attempt to bring students back to school safely, a game-changer might come out of central Illinois.The University of Illinois’ Urbana-Champaign campus has one of the most aggressive COVID-19 testing protocols among institutions of higher education in the country, as it aims to keep students on campus during the pandemic this fall.Twice a week, the university tests all students residing on or off campus and employees who report to university facilities using a noninvasive saliva test created by the research institution. That has amounted to as many as 15,000 or 17,000 tests administered in one day — more tests than most universities with on-campus learning have completed since the start of the pandemic, and what a smaller institution testing all its students might handle in a month.In the last week of August, the university accounted for nearly 20% of all tests reported in Illinois, according to the state health department. It’s even notably measurable nationwide.“Two percent of all the tests that happen in the country today will be by the University of Illinois,” Chris Marsicano, founding director of the College Crisis Initiative at Davidson College — which is tracking higher education institutions’ responses to COVID-19 — told ABC News.“Their testing regime is incredible,” he added.Testing is just one part of UIUC’s approach to halt the virus in its tracks. Along with measures such as wearing masks, social distancing and contact tracing, it offers a mix of face-to-face, hybrid and online courses to more than 52,000 undergraduate and graduate students.“The truth is we cannot test our way out of the pandemic,” Dr. Rebecca Smith, an epidemiologist at UIUC who designed its testing and exposure notification strategy, told ABC News. “That’s never going to be enough.”Test breakthroughBack in the spring, as UIUC was sending students home at the beginning of the pandemic, university leaders started thinking about how they could get them back on campus safely in the fall.“We knew there were going to be outbreaks as soon as the students returned,” Chancellor Robert Jones told ABC News. “The primary goal was, how do you mitigate those outbreaks?”Part of that plan was to administer mandatory tests frequently — upward of 10,000 a day — and cheaply, with quick turnaround times on results.“The chancellor and provost said, ‘Get it done,’” Dr. Martin Burke, associate dean for research at UIUC’s Carle Illinois College of Medicine and leader of the university’s testing program, told ABC News. “They wanted to deploy a scalable testing model.”They ruled out the standard nasal swab test, which was cost-prohibitive and impacted by supply chain issues, Burke said. A saliva test seemed the way to go. It showed promise, with greater detection sensitivity than samples from deep nasal swabs, according to an April study by Yale University. It could also be done quickly and wouldn’t need to be administered by a health care worker, Burke said.In mid-May, UIUC began developing its own saliva test with a team that included chemists, data scientists, epidemiologists and veterinary virologists. Burke said the team had a breakthrough in deactivating and isolating the RNA of the virus in a sample — normally an involved and expensive process — by heating the saliva sample at 95 degrees Celsius (about 203 degrees Fahrenheit) for 30 minutes.Most diagnostic testing has had notoriously slow turnaround times. But UIUC’s saliva test, which removes some of the steps involved in nasal swab sample testing, can be processed in as little as five hours. Since UIUC performs all its testing in its veterinary lab, versus multiple labs like some colleges and universities do, testing numbers are also easier to track, Melaney Arnold, a spokesperson for the state health department, told ABC News.All of this innovation comes at a cost. Implementing UIUC’s testing capability, including modifying the veterinary lab for COVID testing, ran about $6 million to $7 million, Jones said. It’s an investment for the near future.“We think this has given us a competitive advantage, time will tell,” Jones said. “Testing is going to be with us until the next year, next two, maybe next three — we don’t know.”Testing in actionOnce the university had a viable test, the team had to determine how often to use it, how to notify people of the results and then have a plan to isolate those who tested positive. “Fast and frequent” is the unofficial motto for the university’s testing strategy.“It really has to be that integrated, fast and frequent testing program to make the whole thing work,” Burke said. “Because the pace at which the virus expands inside a person, you really do have a preciously short window of time to find out who’s positive, quickly help them isolate safely and stop them from spreading it to others.”Initially, the school thought they’d test once a week, but based on modeling, realized that twice a week would be most effective.At nearly 20 testing sites set up across campus, students and staff can walk up and self-administer a free COVID-19 test. They are advised to avoid eating, drinking, brushing their teeth, chewing gum or smoking an hour before submitting their sample. Swiping their school ID prints a barcoded sticker that goes on their testing tube. They dribble half a teaspoon of saliva into the tube and put it on a rack with other samples. The whole process takes about seven minutes, Burke said.Every hour, the racks of samples are delivered by golf cart to the campus’ veterinary lab and go straight into the hot water bath to deactivate the virus. The lab runs tests 24 hours a day on weekdays, and nearly that on weekends.When the lab scans the barcode on the test tube, it connects to the person’s medical record. The results of the test are delivered via a HIPAA-compliant secure portal or app, dubbed Safer Illinois, that UIUC created. App users can also opt in to a Bluetooth feature that alerts them if they’ve spent more than 15 minutes within 6 feet of a confirmed case and should get tested.If faculty, staff and students receive a negative result at least every four days, they get a checkmark in the app and can enter campus buildings with their school ID. Some bars and restaurants are also using the app to let students gain entry, Burke said.Another key feature of the school’s COVID-19 strategy is isolating those who have tested positive as soon as possible. The university has found that the local health department has had trouble getting ahold of students promptly, with some students purposely ignoring the calls, Burke said, so it recently started directly reaching out to them. Its goal is to contact a positive case within 30 minutes and connect them with support.Smith said the school has received a positive response from students.“It’s nice to know there’s a human looking out for them,” she said.JJ Kim, a UIUC junior and editor of the student newspaper, The Daily Illini, told ABC News he was “skeptical” at first how long the school would be able to keep its campus open. But so far, the school’s testing efforts and enforcement of masks and social distancing have been mostly encouraging.“Hearing the way our school has handled coronavirus compared to other schools, I feel relatively safe,” Kim said. “Just seeing every school around us go down like flies, it feels like the last man standing kind of thing.”Course correctionThe testing works “as long as everybody does their part,” Burke said. The team anticipated that wouldn’t always be the case, and their data models accounted for issues like noncompliance with mask-wearing and social distancing in determining how often to test the campus. But what they didn’t predict, he said, was that some students would not follow orders to isolate after testing positive for COVID-19 or quarantine after they had been in contact with someone who tested positive.On Sept. 2, the university reported it had seen more than 400 new positive cases since the first day of classes on Aug. 24. It pointed to large parties and gatherings over the past weekend as the main culprit, as well as students ignoring guidance to isolate and quarantine.The positivity rate had also increased in the days leading up to Sept. 2, from around 0.5% when students first returned to campus to a peak of 2.86%. That day, the school announced it would be going into a two-week lockdown, with only essential activities like food shopping and getting tested permitted, to help curb the recent rise in cases.In addition to the lockdown, the school is also “intensifying” disciplinary action, it said. UIUC has suspended a handful of students for the fall semester, and is investigating about 100 other infractions, Jones said.“We certainly hope that people learn lessons from this, that we’re serious,” the chancellor said.Now, a week after announcing the lockdown, the positivity rate on campus is around 1%. Jones would like to see it get back down to around 0.5%.“That is very low relative to some of our peers that have had double-digit positivity rates,” Jones said. “That is our goal, to never allow it to get as high as some of our colleagues have experienced.”As the testing capacity has increased, the lab has also experienced a bit of a slowdown in turning around results, with some taking up to 48 hours, Smith said. The university has recently introduced robotics, with plans to add more, to help accelerate and streamline the lab work. Smith is also helping to run monthly risk surveys to help narrow down who is most likely to get the virus.“Right now we’re fishing in the ocean, and we’d rather fish in a pond,” Smith said.One thing that’s become apparent: Most confirmed cases — around 95% — are in undergraduates, officials said. This week, the school told faculty they could now get tested once a week if they so choose, Jones said.“This data is allowing us to look at this in a much more aggressive, comprehensive way than any place that I know of,” he said. “We certainly hope that that is going to allow us to keep our community safe and mitigate the spread.”Illinois and beyondThe saliva-based test, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration under an emergency use authorization last month, is also being used on University of Illinois campuses in Chicago and Springfield.UIUC has also fielded interest in its test from more than 35 universities. One — Illinois State University — is in the process of building out a $1 million lab, with plans to give students, faculty and staff the saliva test at least once per week.“As our surveillance testing ramps up, we expect that expanded testing will result in a lower positivity rate,” John Baur, professor of chemistry and COVID-19 testing coordinator at Illinois State, said in a statement.UIUC is building mobile labs to perform COVID-19 tests in different communities in Illinois. The first is set to roll out in the coming days, officials said. It is also exploring the possibility of working with different countries and cities, as well as communities like Army bases and prisons, and sharing what it’s learned.“More important than our test is our program — just trying to think about the whole thing. How do you create a bubble?” Burke said. “I think the lessons that we are learning by running this program will perhaps be more valuable than the test itself.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. 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ICL aims to cut call centre staff turnover

first_imgICL aims to cut call centre staff turnoverOn 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. ICL has changed its call centre policy in a bid to slash employee turnoverin the coming year. Under the new approach, staff are assessed by the number of calls they solverather than the number of calls they take. The initiative was piloted in four of ICL’s seven UK call centres. It cutstaff turnover from 24 to 6 per cent and resulted in a 20 per cent rise incustomer satisfaction. Peter Richardson, HR director for infrastructure and operations at ICL,expects the scheme to cut staff turnover at call centres from 20 per cent tothe company’s average of between 11 and 13 per cent. He said, “There is no reason why call centre staff turnover should beworse than the rest of the business. Twenty per cent is too high and I expectthe management scheme to make a big dent in the staff turnover rate.” The new approach makes call centres more customer focused and will cut thenumber of calls staff have to handle as problems are solved more effectively. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Advisers from Pinsent Curtis Biddle answer questions

first_imgAdvisers from Pinsent Curtis Biddle answer questionsOn 1 May 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Advisers from Pinsent Curtis Biddle answerquestionsChristopher Mordue on grievance proceduresQ The new statutory discipline, dismissal and grievance procedures comeinto force in April 2004. Is there anything employers should be doing toprepare? A The new statutory procedures under the Employment Act 2002 will beone of the most fundamental employment law reforms for many years, impacting onthe day-to-day management of all employment disputes. Breach of the procedureswill significantly affect both liability and compensation in tribunal cases.The importance of these reforms makes it essential employers prepare well inadvance. Some details of the new procedures and how they work will only beclear once the regulations are published. But the basic scheme is reasonablyclear and there are a number of steps employers should now be considering. The new procedures will apply to all employees and become part of theircontract of employment. The discipline and dismissal procedure applies to allforms of disciplinary action, even oral warnings, and to all dismissals. Breachby the employer will mean that any dismissal is automatically unfair. What’smore, compensation will be increased by at least 10 per cent and possibly by 50per cent. The statutory grievance procedure will need to be followed by all employeesbefore they make any complaint to an employment tribunal. Breach of theprocedure will lead to any damages awarded (for example, an award fordiscrimination) being increased by 10 to 50 per cent. In advance of these changes, employers need to carefully review theirexisting procedures to ensure compliance with the new statutory scheme. Theyneed to consider how (if at all) they will reflect the contractual status ofthe new procedures in their contracts of employment and procedural documents.They also need to carefully review and reconsider how they deal with employmentdisputes in practice. For example, the new procedures require employers tostart the dismissal or disciplinary process by explaining, in writing, thecircumstances that have led them to consider dismissing or disciplining theemployee. Employers also need to carefully review how disciplinary anddismissal hearings are conducted, what information is provided to the employeeand at what stage, and the length of time taken for each stage. Employers must also consider whether they need any new dismissal procedures,in particular, for dealing with performance issues, ill-health terminations andredundancies, and whether they need to adopt any new grievance procedures todeal with specific types of complaints. For example, many employers alreadyhave specific procedures for dealing with allegations of sexual or racialharassment and it may be appropriate to introduce specific procedures for othertypes of complaint. The new statutory scheme threatens to punish basic procedural errors veryharshly. Therefore, it is vital for employers to effectively communicate thenew statutory procedures to line managers. This can be accomplished through trainingand written guidance on how to deal with disciplinary cases, grievances and thevarious forms of dismissal. This training and guidance should also cover otherrelevant employment law risks, such as unfair dismissal law more generally anddiscrimination complaints. Employers should also prepare for far heavier use of their grievanceprocedures once the new rules take effect. One issue is of time and resources –are there enough trained managers at each level of the grievance procedure tohear the grievances? Will appeals impact particularly heavily on the time ofsenior managers, who might then have to give evidence in employment tribunalcases? If so, could the procedure be changed to spread the time burden moreeffectively? A further change to be introduced under the Employment Act 2002 relates tothe statutory statement of main terms and conditions of employment. Currently,there is no real sanction for a failure to provide this statement or for afailure to keep it up-to-date. From next April, employers will face a ‘fine’ ofup to two weeks’ pay for such breaches. Employees will have no free-standingclaim for this amount. However, if the employee wins any kind of tribunal case,the tribunal must then assess whether or not the obligation to provide andmaintain an accurate statement has been breached and, if so, can impose thefine. Claire Newberry on sex discriminationQ We seconded employees to a joint venture company; the joint venturepartner provided the management team. Now, one of our female employees hasresigned and complained of sex discrimination by a manager. It seems she raiseda grievance against her supervisor and the manager dealt with her grievanceless favourably than he dealt with another raised against the same supervisorby a man – who is also one of our employees. Are we liable for the actions of amanager who isn’t even one of our employees? A Your company may well be liable for the actions of the manager,even though it does not employ him. In a recent and similar case (Victor-Davisv Hackney London Borough Council, 2003, All ER (D) 318, Feb), the manager was acontractor and not an employee of the council. As soon as the council formedthe view that the contractor manager had behaved inappropriately, it tookappropriate steps to deal with the situation. The council assumed that withoutknowledge, it would not be held liable for the inappropriate acts of thecontractor manager. The tribunal agreed. However, it was overruled by theEmployment Appeal Tribunal. The EAT provided guidance in dealing with such situations. The properapproach to determine your company’s liability is to consider whether or notthe manager was acting on authority conferred by your company when he allegedlycommitted the discriminatory act. Your joint venture partner provided theentire management team. It would appear that in carrying out normal managementactivities, the manager was acting on authority conferred (explicit or implied)by your company. Handling a grievance may be classed as normal managementactivities, so your company may well find itself liable for a discriminatoryact committed by a non-employee. The Victor-Davis case concerned sex and race discrimination, but the EAT’sguidance could also be applied to non-discrimination cases. So, the conduct ofan agency manager, say, could saddle an employer with liability forconstructive unfair dismissal. All the more reason, then, for employers tothink carefully before conferring authority on non-employees. If this cannot beavoided, then such arrangements need to be carefully structured so thatresponsibilities are thoughtfully allocated, and that all three parties(employees, managers and employers) know where those responsibilities lie.Finally, an employer who confers authority to manage on a non-employee needs amechanism for addressing any management failures. In the case of your company,this would be by having complaints about the manager dealt with by your jointventure partner as a disciplinary/performance issue. John McMullen on TUPE reformsQ What is the position with regard to the reform of TUPE and when will ithappen? A The reform of TUPE should be regarded as a jigsaw puzzle containinga number of pieces. First, on 13 February 2003, the office of the Deputy PrimeMinister published details of a code of practice applicable to local authoritytransfers of employees to a private or voluntary sector partner as part of acontract to provide any local public service. The code will ensure that contractors confirm their obligations to protectthe terms and conditions of transferring local government employees, includingthe right to ongoing access to the local government pension scheme or to analternative good quality occupational pension scheme. The guide will also applyto new joiners, who must be offered new terms and conditions that are overallno less favourable than those of transferred employees. New joiners will alsohave to be offered a reasonable pension provision which may either bemembership of the local government pension scheme, membership of a good qualityemployer pension scheme or membership of a stakeholder pension scheme with anemployer contribution. Further information can be obtained from the officialwebsite (www.odpm.gov.uk). As for the TUPE regulations themselves, on 14 February 2003, the secretaryof state for trade and industry announced new regulations would be published indraft during the first half of 2003, with a view to placing them beforeParliament in the autumn of 2003, coming into effect in spring 2004. But thecoverage of occupational pension rights under TUPE will be consideredseparately and to a longer timescale as part of the pensions review being takenforward by the Government’s Green Paper Pensions in the Workplace published on17 December 2002. The TUPE revisions, it is promised, will include giving more comprehensivecoverage to service contracting operations (not including those involving highlevel ‘professional services’) with the aim of improving the operation of themarket and promoting business flexibility; introducing a requirement on the oldemployer (transferor) to notify the new employer (transferee) of the employmentliabilities that will be transferring, thus increasing the transparency of thetransfer process and combating “sharp practice”; clarifying thecircumstances in which employers can lawfully make transfer-related dismissalsand negotiate transfer-related changes to terms and conditions of employmentfor economic, technical or organisational (ETO) reasons; and introducing newflexibility into the regulations application in relation to the transfer ofinsolvent businesses, promoting the ‘rescue culture’. Christopher Booth on dependants leaveQ Over the last three months, my PA has been absent from work on a dozenor so occasions in order to look after her son, who has been diagnosed withhaemophilia. While I am sympathetic about her reasons for being absent, and Iam aware that employees have a right to time off to look after dependants, Ineed my PA at work. A An employee is entitled to take a reasonable amount of time offduring working hours in order to take action that is necessary: – to provide assistance when a dependant falls ill, gives birth or isinjured – to make arrangements for the provision of care for a dependant who fallsill The right does not apply unless the employee tells her employer the reasonfor their absence as soon as reasonably practicable and how long they expect tobe absent. In Qua v John Ford Morrison Solicitors, EAT 884/01, the EAT gave someguidance on the determination of a ‘reasonable’ amount of time off in order totake action which is ‘necessary’. – Factors taken into account will include the nature of the incident thathas occurred, the relationship between the employee and the dependant, and theextent to which anyone else was available to help – In determining what is the reasonable amount of time off, this is aquestion of fact for the tribunal in every situation, but the disruption orinconvenience caused to an employer’s business by the absence are irrelevant.However, an employer can take into account the number and length of previous absencesas well as the dates when they occurred, in order to determine whether the timeoff on a subsequent occasion is reasonable and necessary – The right to time off to “provide assistance” does not enableemployees to take time off to provide the care themselves, beyond thereasonable amount necessary to enable them to deal with the immediate crisis.The statute envisages some temporary assistance – The statute contemplates a reasonable period of time off to enable anemployee to deal with a dependant who has fallen ill unexpectedly. Once it isknown the dependant is suffering from an underlying medical condition – whichis likely to cause regular relapses – such a situation no longer falls withinthe scope of the statute once arrangements have been made for the provision ofcare for that dependant, unless there is some disruption of those arrangementsthat necessitates input from the employee. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Aryzta announces plans to raise £715m in capital

first_imgAryzta is aiming to raise around £715m as part of plans to strengthen its presence in the frozen bakery market.The move follows a profit warning in May and announcement of plans to reduce costs over the next three years as the business comes under pressure from increased labour and ingredient costs.In a statement issued this morning (13 August), the company said it had undertaken a detailed review of its capital structure and would now approach shareholders with a view to raising €800m (£715m).The additional funding will be used primarily to reduce debt, which Aryzta said would give it the strategic and financial flexibility it needed to implement its business plan and focus on the frozen bakery market.Aryzta also reported that trading in its fourth quarter had been in line with expectations and with the guidance it gave in its profit warning in May.The company added that it remained committed to its previously announced €1bn deleveraging plan, made up of a combination of cash flow generation and at least €450m of asset disposals. Aryzta said it had made solid progress with disposal of non-core assets and that it still planned to dispose of its stake in French retail group Picard.“A significantly improved capital structure will provide Aryzta with the means to continue to take the necessary steps to reposition the business and deliver on our strategy,” said Aryzta chief executive Kevin Toland.“Over the medium term, we expect to generate significant cash flow, which will be applied towards continued net debt reduction and to resource selective growth opportunities.”In April, Aryzta appointed former Frieslandcampina chief operating officer Gregory Sklikas as CEO of its European business.last_img read more

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Scottish bakery introduces graduate celebration platter

first_imgScottish bakery Fisher & Donaldson has unveiled a celebration buffet platter for university and school graduates during the Covid-19 pandemic.With university and school graduations cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic, graduating university students, year six (P6) and sixth-year pupils are missing out celebrating their academic achievements, said the firm.This led to the creation of the Class of 2020 buffet platter, targeted at pupils, students and families at home.The platter (rsp: £8.99) comprises filled rolls, savoury pastries and a selection of mini cakes, including the bakery’s popular fudge doughnut and a cupcake with a ‘Class of 2020’ edible scroll.“We can all remember how special that last day of school before summer was, and after years of hard work at university, a graduation ceremony is a really important part of moving forward into the working world,” said Chloe Milne, marketing manager at Fisher & Donaldson.The buffet platters are available for delivery in St Andrews, Cupar, Dundee and the surrounding villages, and can also be collected from the bakery’s St Andrews or Cupar branches.“We recognised how sorely missed these occasions would be by pupils and students in our local area and decided to make something extra special, so they could celebrate in style at home,” added Milne.“We hope these treats will be enjoyed and help make an occasion out of what could have been a disappointing day.”last_img read more

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