Yet another death in Cleveland jail

first_imgClevelandOn Nov. 9 Shone Trawick became the third person to die in Cleveland’s Cuyahoga County Jail this year and the 12th jail death since June 2018. Trawick is the first casualty to be blamed on violence by another prisoner. Those in nearby cells reportedly screamed for help on hearing the assault.Demonstrators gather outside the Cuyahoga County Jail, May 29. Since the protest, three more people have died in the jail. WW photo: Martha GrevattPreventable deaths were previously attributed to overdose, suicide and inadequate medical care. Lea Rayshon Daye, a 28-year-old Black trans woman, died last August in her cell. Michael Wormick died in July. Both were homeless at the time of their arrest.Daye had written a letter, found in her cell by her mother, intended to expose human right violations including inedible and inadequate food and substandard medical care.Beatings by guards — not by other incarcerated people — have led to multiple lawsuits. The same week that Trawick’s death was reported, Jasper Muldrow Jr. sued the county over the 2018 traumatic beating of his mentally ill son, Jasper Muldrow III. The jail officer, Charles Enoch, who instigated the assault, was recently sentenced to a year probation with no jail time. Four other guards who joined Enoch in attacking Muldrow have not been charged.The jail’s scandalous conditions and high rate of deaths led to the formation of the Coalition to Stop the Inhumanity at the Cuyahoga County Jail in December 2018. Regular protests have taken place outside the downtown jail for almost two years. The Coalition joined LGBTQ+ and homeless advocates in a joint online press conference (covered by Workers World) after Daye’s death.What drew media national attention to the county jail, however, was not the deplorable conditions. It was the widely-hailed decision to shrink the jail population to limit COVID-19 spread. But many prisoners were then transferred to state prisons that were COVID hotspots. Now the county jail population, previously subjected to massive overcrowding that intensified spread of the virus, is again nearing capacity.It is possible that jail authorities will use Trawick’s tragic death to impose collective punishment — such as lockdowns and harsher restrictions — on all 1,500 people now housed at the county jail.Everything happening at the Cuyahoga County Jail is another argument for prison abolition and another reason to “free them all.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Indiana Harvest Almost Complete

first_img Facebook Twitter SHARE By Gary Truitt – Nov 13, 2012 Facebook Twitter Previous articleNCBA Looks to Congress for Permanent Estate Tax ReliefNext articleHow to Plan to Farm in a Drought Gary Truitt Harvest of corn and soybeans is winding down around the state with many operations now finished, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. The majority of the remaining corn is in north central and eastern counties. Replenished soil moisture and moderate fall temperatures have allowed for good growth and development of hay and cover crops before winter. More cover crops have been planted than normal to help preserve the unused nutrients in the soil due to the summer drought.center_img Ninety-five percent of the corn acreage has been harvested compared to 83 percent last year and 84 percent for the 5-year average. By area, 94 percent of the corn acreage has been harvested in the north, 94 percent in the central region, and 97 percent in the south. Moisture content of harvested corn is averaging about 17.5 percent.Ninety-six percent of the soybean acreage has been harvested compared to 95 percent for both last year and the 5-year average. By area, 97 percent of the soybean acreage has been harvested in the north, 96 percent in the central region, and 94 percent in the south. Moisture content of harvested soybeans is averaging about 13 percent.Ninety-eight percent of the winter wheat acreage has been planted compared to 97 percent last year and 95 percent for the 5-year average. Eighty-six percent of the winter wheat acreage has emerged compared to 86 percent last year and 79 percent for the 5-year average. Seventy-four percent of the winter wheat acreage is in good to excellent condition compared to 71 percent last year at this time. SHARE Home CROPS Indiana Crop Progress and Condition Report Indiana Harvest Almost Complete Indiana Harvest Almost Completelast_img read more

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Morgan Stanley Announces $1.25B Settlement with FHFA

first_img February 5, 2014 746 Views Tagged with: Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac MBS Morgan Stanley Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe Fannie Mae FHFA Freddie Mac MBS Morgan Stanley 2014-02-05 Tory Barringer Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / Morgan Stanley Announces $1.25B Settlement with FHFA Morgan Stanley is the latest company to make peace with the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) over alleged misrepresentation of bad securities sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Tuesday, Morgan Stanley revealed it has reached a $1.25 billion agreement in principle with FHFA to resolve pending mortgage-backed securities (MBS)-related litigation. In connection with the settlement, the company announced it is recording a $150 million addition to its fourth-quarter legal reserves.The agreement remains subject to final approvals by both parties.FHFA did not release a statement on the settlement, though a public affairs officer confirmed the language in the SEC filing.Morgan Stanley is the eighth bank to settle with FHFA out of 18 named in a legal complaint filed in 2011 on behalf of the GSEs. The banks were accused of making untrue statements and “material omissions” in MBS sales, resulting in disastrous losses at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.Last year, the agency recovered approximately $8 billion in settlements related to that filing, with JPMorgan Chase, UBS Americas, Citigroup, and Ally Financial—among others—all striking deals to wipe the slate clean. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Headlines, News, Secondary Market The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Share Save Previous: DS News Webcast: Wednesday 2/5/2014 Next: Long Island Ranked Nation’s Hottest Market, Florida Metros Struggle The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Morgan Stanley Announces $1.25B Settlement with FHFA Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Related Articleslast_img read more

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HUD Touring the Nation, Speaking on Affordable Housing

first_img Previous: Spotlight on Financial Services Law Firms Next: House Releases Amicus Brief on CFPB Constitutionality Case Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago January 27, 2020 1,722 Views in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Ben Carson HUD 2020-01-27 Mike Albanese Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: Mike Albanese Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribe HUD Touring the Nation, Speaking on Affordable Housing Tagged with: Ben Carson HUD Home / Daily Dose / HUD Touring the Nation, Speaking on Affordable Housing Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Secretary Dr. Benjamin Carson announced Monday that the Department will lead a bus tour across the nation focused on removing barriers to affordable housing. The tour—Driving Affordable Housing Across America—will begin in Louisville, Kentucky, on Wednesday, stopping in different communities for events and discussions on affordable housing. “In our efforts to alleviate the unnecessary regulatory barriers to housing construction and development, it’s important that we get out into local communities and hear directly from our fellow citizens who are grappling with rising housing prices and learn more about best practices to address them,” Carson said. “Families, businesses and all levels of government have concerns about the rising cost of housing, and this is an opportunity to bring those parties to the table for a discussion about how we can work together to fix the problem.”HUD state the tour is part of Carson’s work as the Chair of the White Housing Council on Eliminating Regulatory Barriers to Affordable Housing. The Council’s eight-member agencies are engaging with governments at the local, state, and tribal level. The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) released its 2020 priced out estimates report and it casts an ominous shadow over the future fate of home prices. Data shows that if the average price for a new home raises by just $1,000, at least 158,857 homeowners would be entirely priced out of the housing market. According to the report, homeowners would no longer be able to qualify for the mortgages based on their current incomes. These statistics stretched across the nation, showing that although the homeowners would have been able to quality before the increase, following the rise in home prices, they were kicked out of contention.The report also broke down the states and metropolitan areas would be most affected by this pricing out predicament, as it varied widely across the nation. This wide-scale makes sense, as most of the factors that contributed to certain areas being priced out more than other involved the sizes of the local population living within the areas, as well as the affordability of the new homes.  Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Mike Albanese is a reporter for DS News and MReport. He is a University of Alabama graduate with a degree in journalism and a minor in communications. He has worked for publications—both print and online—covering numerous beats. A Connecticut native, Albanese currently resides in Lewisville. last_img read more

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Morgan named new E911 director

first_img Email the author Morgan said the biggest challenge for Pike County E911  is the disconnection of the county’s systems.“Right now, you have the Troy Police Department, the Pike County Sheriff’s Department and the Brundidge Police Department all answering and dispatching the calls that come in,” Morgan said. “And that does not include Haynes Ambulance, the state troopers and Troy University.”With Troy and Brundidge police departments and the Pike County Sheriff’s Department all on different systems, there is a disconnect, Morgan said, and that could result in a loss in response time.Morgan said there is interest in and dedication to improving the emergency services. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day By The Penny Hoarder Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Print Article You Might Like Sponsored Content Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Next UpHis experience there includes management of radio, phones and computers. He also directed the drug program and the acquisition of a million-dollar radio system.Morgan said his attraction to Pike County E911  was ability of all those involved to work together.“Chris Dozier, former Pike County E911 director, called and asked me to apply,” Morgan said. “I talked with a lot of people and they said there is a lot of room for improvement but everyone is willing to work together to get things done. Everyone is on the same page in wanting the E911 system to be as good as it can be.” Morgan named new E911 director “All those involved are willing to work together,” he said. “I have spoken to each location and they have all agreed that something needs to be done and they are willing to do whatever it takes.”Looking down the road, Morgan said the Pike County Commission is considering the benefits of an E911 building for Pike County.“To consolidate all of the agencies into one would be of great benefit to all Pike County citizens,” Morgan said. “From there, Pike County E911 would provide better training and quality assurance and also increase the ability to handle a surge of calls.Right now, in Brundidge there is only one dispatcher on duty so only one call could go out. With the consolidation of the agencies’ line slots, those additional slots could ultimately save lives.An E911  building would cost around $5 million but the benefits would far exceed the cost, Morgan said. “The Pike County Commission would be looking to two-and-a-half years for full completion but the staff and dispatchers could possibly move in sooner.”Morgan, his wife and two children, ages 3 and 9 months, will make their home in Troy. They are looking forward to being an active and involved part of the community. Published 7:00 pm Friday, November 27, 2020 By Jaine Treadwell Artist Bob Corley shares process, works with JCA audience Every artist’s reception at the Johnson Center for the Arts is a big event. But those that feature local artists… read more Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson David Morgan has been on the job as the Pike County E911 director for two weeks. Already, he is comfortably at work and looking forward to providing improved E911 services to the people of Pike County.Morgan has been working in the related area of emergency services for 16 years, including three years in the Birmingham area and as systems administrator for Blount County prior to coming to Pike County.last_img read more

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SLP Adjunct – College of Education and Professional Studies

first_imgPosition Overview:Note: Adjunct positions at UCO are part-time teaching positions.This posting is to create a pool of interested applicants fromwhich the Department may draw as sections become open at any pointin the current academic year. This posting may or may not result inthe hiring of adjuncts. Adjunct Faculty – provides a qualitylearning experience for students on a semester basis. Adjunctfaculty reports to a dean or chair and performs instruction-relatedduties and responsibilities in a timely manner and in accordancewith the mission, policies and procedures of the college. Therelationship of the adjunct faculty member to the student is one ofteacher and facilitator of learning.College/Department Overview:The College of Education and Professional Studies currently has 100full-time and over 100 part-time faculty organized in sevendepartments. The college offers 23 undergraduate majors and 28graduate majors. All teacher education programs are CAEPaccredited. Other programs are recognized at the state and nationallevels with accreditations by the American College of SportsMedicine (ACSM), the American Dietetic Association (ADA), theAmerican Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), the NationalAssociation for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), theNational Council on Family Relations (NCFR), and the OklahomaEducational Quality and Accountability Commission (OEQA). UCO’sCollege of Education and Professional Studies has an enrollment ofnearly 4,800 students, about one-fourth of whom are graduatestudents. For further information see our website athttp://www.uco.edu/cepsDepartment Specific Essential Job Functions:Teach “AAC” Alternative and Augmentative Communication, course inthe Speech-Language Pathology program. The duties include theselection of textbook, creation and delivery of lecture materials,creation and administration of evaluation instruments of studentlearning, and arranging educational speakers or opportunities asappropriate. The course is typically offered one evening per weekfor the semester. Specific and extensive experience with AACimplementation is preferred.QualificationsExperience Required:Possesses at least a master’s degree in the field specified in theposition announcement (exceptions require Academic Affairsapproval). Possesses excellent communication, problem-solving, andorganizational skills.Experience Preferred:Must have a minimum of a Masters degree and must hold current ASHACertification and Oklahoma State license to practiceSpeech-Language Pathology. The applicant must have specificexperience with the theory and implementation of AAC. Highereducation teaching experience.Knowledge/Skills/Abilities:The applicant must have specific experience with the theory andimplementation of AAC. Higher education teaching experiencedesired.Physical Demands:Repetitive movement of hands and fingers – typing and/or writing.Frequent standing, and/or sitting. Occasional walking, stooping,kneeling or crouching. Reach with hands and arms. Visuallyidentify, observe and assess. Ability to communicate withsupervisor/students/colleagues. Regular physical attendancerequired. The physical demands and work environment characteristicsdescribed here are representative of those that must be met by anemployee to successfully perform the essential functions of thisjob. Reasonable accommodations (in accordance with ADArequirements) may be made, upon request, to enable individuals withdisabilities to perform essential functions.last_img read more

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ROBERTS, REV. THOMAS C.

first_img72, died on December 14, 2017. Born in Union City, he attended Thomas A. Edison Grammar School and Emerson High School in Union City. He was a 1974 graduate of St. Peter’s University, Jersey City with a B.S. in Urban Studies; a 1980 graduate of Fordham University, Bronx, NY with an M.A. in Religious Education; a 1983 graduate of Immaculate Conception Seminary, Mahwah NJ with a Masters in Divinity in Pastoral Counseling. Fr. Tom was ordained by Archbishop Peter L. Gerety on Nov. 17, 1984. Between 1985 and 1989, he served as Parochial Vicar at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish, Scotch Plains and Holy Rosary Church, Jersey City and Dean of Downtown Jersey City Parishes; from 1993-2017, he served the Parish Communities of St. Mary and St Bernard, Plainfield, the Catholic Community Services, Mt. Carmel Guild Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Montclair, as Chaplain of NJ Northern State Prison; St. Michael/St. Joseph and Our Lady of the Assumption Parishes, both in Bayonne. He was in residence at St. John Vianney in Rutherford before he was made Administrator of Our Lady of Sorrows/Christ the King Parishes, Jersey City from July 1 – Nov. 1, 2017 before his retirement. Fr. Tom was a proud vocation from Our Lady of Sorrows Parish. Son of the late Marcella “Leslie” Leap D’Arpino and Samuel D’Arpino. Brother of the late Earl and Kenneth Roberts and Marcy D’Arpino Gray. Uncle of Amy Gray. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to Our Lady of Sorrows Food Pantry, 93 Clerk St., Jersey City, NJ 07305. GREENVILLE MEMORIAL HOME, 374 Danforth Ave., Jersey City.last_img read more

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Genesis Crafty scoops film promo

first_imgNorthern Ireland-based artisan bakery Genesis Crafty has launched a new on-pack promotion ’pic-a-nics’, in association with film-maker Warner Bros to promote its new release Yogi Bear 3D.The promotion will run across four of Genesis Crafty’s most popular lines: Big Pancakes, Lemon & Raisin Pancakes, Double Butter & Sultana Scones and Toaster Wheaten on around 300,000 packs from now until the end of March. The products are available in Waitrose and Sainsbury’s stores nationwide, as well as throughout the grocery retail trade in Northern Ireland. The top prize is a family adventure holiday, sponsored by Nomad Living.”For a regional artisan bakery, this is a fantastic opportunity, giving us a high profile in the UK market that would otherwise have been difficult to achieve,” said Liesa Johnston, marketing manager at Genesis Crafty.last_img read more

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The Magic Of Bringing Your Kids To LOCKN’

first_img“Veteran” festival attendees still feel the magic surrounding festival season. The weeks leading up, the excitement, the planning—it doesn’t get old, you just learn a little more each year and hopefully pass that wisdom on to those coming up behind you. This year at LOCKN’, I decided to bring my six-year-old, Ryder. It was by no means his first show, but it was his first real festival and first time camping. For music-loving parents, bringing kids to their first festival is equivalent to others taking their child to Disney World for the first time. Parents experience the magic of the festival through their children’s eyes, sharing in the innocent and immense enthusiasm of a child.Dad, Please Never Stop Going To Music Festivals: An Open LetterDuring LOCKN’, Ryder couldn’t get enough. He loved every moment and wasn’t fazed by any of the bumps along the way. We drove from Florida to Virginia and made our home in the family camping area. He immediately met our neighbors and played safely under the eyes of multiple parents while I finished setting up camp. For the next four days, Ryder was dirty, stinky, covered in orange clay, and couldn’t have been happier.Ryder was able to experience music in a way that I believe bypasses most adults—he felt it and instantly became part of the community. To him, no one was a stranger. He wanted to hear stories about where people had come from and what bands they wanted to see. He spent a lot of time admiring and falling in love with every piece at Morning Dew Tie-Dye, and the owners were wonderful to him, answering his questions and embracing his curiosity. Later in the weekend, one of the owners (Sam) from Morning Dew Tie-Dyes tapped my shoulder and asked me to give Ryder a beautiful stone shaped like a pyramid, saying “I want him to have it.” Ryder was over the moon with delight, and the gift still sits safely on his dresser.When the tire on his wagon broke, we headed over to the Handlebar Café to see if they could repair it. They could not have been kinder and did everything in their power to fix Ryder’s wagon, letting him help and teaching him the process of what they were doing along the way. They spent almost two hours on his wagon—for free! Plus, someone there told him we had to go to Garcia’s Forest, and it ended up being one of the favorite things he saw at LOCKN’ this year.While all of this was an incredible experience to watch, it was very emotional for me as well because Ryder has special needs. He has global apraxia—a motor planning disorder that makes it difficult for children to use their fine and gross motor skills—and struggles to speak. Everyone took the time to meet him and understand him. Another major obstacle is that Ryder has (SPD) sensory processing disorder. I was internally terrified of how he would respond to the crowd, the music, the lights, the smells, the food—everything! The festival experience is a lot for most adults, to be honest, and I wasn’t sure how it would go. However, when Ryder wanted a smoothie before we headed to the main stage for the night, the staff at The Loving Cup were more than happy to accommodate his dietary restrictions even though they were slammed.10 Positive Benefits Of Listening To Music, According to ScienceSome people believe children don’t belong at shows or that it’s pointless to bring them because they won’t remember. However, even if kids don’t remember all the “ins and outs,” the experience helps shape them. My child who struggles every day to do basic tasks has never felt more loved and included. Complete strangers stopped to give him high-fives and dance with him. He played hopscotch with glow sticks in the dark, dug in the dirt, blew bubbles, and ran freely with new friends. He even traded a light-up balloon for a flashing lantern so that he and his new friends could continue to play once the sun was down. He may not remember every detail of the festival, but he’s already excited about LOCKN’ 2018 and asks me all of the time, “How much longer?”Why We Make More Friends And Feel Less Pain At ConcertsI had a friend question me about taking him out of school to attend a music festival. I explained that, to me, Ryder was in school. Festivals are a school of life and love, aiding in a fundamental part of growth, development, and connection. Ryder’s music teacher happens to play in JJ Grey and Mofro—by pure coincidence, Mofro was Ryder’s first show when he was an infant—and was kind enough to give us passes to watch from backstage on Sunday. My son was so excited to see Mr. Eric at his “real job,” as he calls it. When Mofro finished, Ryder went down and had his picture taken with “Mr.” Eric Brigmond (keyboardist) and Craig Barnette (drummer), who gave him his drumsticks and the set list.I’m sure that Ryder will not understand for quite a while what he was a part of at LOCKN’—seeing Bob Weir and Phil Lesh play Terrapin Station for its 40th anniversary, getting gifted drumsticks and meeting musicians backstage. However, he did understand when a woman gave him a gem and told him it was filled with positive energy for him to share with the world, and he did understand when a golf cart taxi driver wanted him to have an intact geode that he’d dug up in Indiana. All of these events may seem insignificant to cynical adults, but to Ryder, it was pure magic.Watch Phil Lesh & Warren Haynes’ Masterful “New Minglewood Blues” At LOCKN’ [Pro-Shot]I strongly believe in the energy that live music produces—there is an undercurrent that binds the community together. In a world filled with so much tension and negativity, it feels like a gift to be able to share with my son a community that I believe in and love. I hope that Ryder continues to feel the music and spread positive energy, just like he was asked to. At one point during the festival as we walked to the main stage, Ryder asked me, “Can we come back next weekend?” I had to explain that next week, the event would turn into a large empty field. In response, he asked, “Well, where do we find this?” I simply replied, “Tour, baby.”Cheers to you LOCKN’ for putting on one hell of a festival for kids of all ages to love and embrace. We will see you back on The Farm next summer.Michelle M. Leigh is a free-spirited Mother of two who vehemently believes in embracing each day and being the change in the world. She enjoys adventures with her children, husband and traveling to as many shows as she can fit into her schedule. As a self-professed lifelong music junkie, she enjoys a wide variety of music and sharing that passion with others, especially her kids. You can follow her at Grateful Momma Bear on social media.last_img read more

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Remembering, and returning to, Selma

first_imgHarvard President Drew Faust delivered Morning Prayers on Friday, offering the intimate crowd in Appleton Chapel some deeply personal and pointed reflections on her experience with the Civil Rights Movement 50 years ago.“History says, don’t hope on this side of the grave,” said Faust, reading from the poem “The Cure at Troy” by Nobel laureate and Harvard Professor Seamus Heaney. “But then, once in a lifetime the longed-for tidal wave of justice can rise up, and hope and history rhyme.”In 1965, Faust was a freshman at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania when grainy, black-and-white images flashed across the TV screen of peaceful protesters being beaten by police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala. The marchers were demonstrating for their constitutional right to vote.In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 1954 school desegregation ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, Faust saw in the growing Civil Rights Movement “the compelling nature of what was right,” and its goals “appeared both unquestionable and unavoidable.”When civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. declared: “No American is without responsibility,” and called for another march, Faust said she knew she “had to go” and take part. “It was a moral imperative. I could do more than hope; I could act. I did not have to await a tidal wave; I could be part of it.”So Faust skipped her midterm exams and headed to Selma. The experience offered her a moment of “absolute and powerful moral clarity,” though over time, she added, she has come to realize that “justice requires perennial struggle.”“No victory is absolute; we have to keep our eyes on the prize to hold on — even to the Voting Rights Act itself, which is being threatened and eroded at the same time we are celebrating its passage.”“It was a moral imperative. I could do more than hope; I could act. I did not have to await a tidal wave; I could be part of it,” said Faust, pictured here in Birmingham, Ala., in 1964.In his own brief remarks, Jonathan Walton, Harvard’s Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church, echoed Faust’s sentiments. “May we both commemorate the past and be catalyzed to act in the present,” he said, “realizing that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere, and may we do our small part to enable hope and history to collide.”In a show of remembrance and solidarity with those hard-fought civil rights victories, Faust, along with President Barack Obama and thousands of others, traveled to Selma on Saturday for the 50th anniversary of the first march to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.“I will never forget that I was given a moment where I could help make hope and history rhyme,” said Faust, looking ahead to the trip. “And I go to Alabama to remember as well those for whom it was far more than just a moment, or a series of abandoned midterms. I go in honor of Martin Luther King, of Hosea Williams, of James Bevel, of Diane Nash, of Andrew Young, of Jimmie Lee Jackson, of John Lewis, and of so many others who have devoted their lives to the cause of justice and freedom.”“May we both commemorate the past and be catalyzed to act in the present,” said Jonathan Walton, who also offered brief remarks. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“I go to Selma to honor these lives — and all lives and times of such meaning and purpose.”During the brief service, the Choral Fellows of the Harvard University Choir offered a moving musical tribute to King, singing “Precious Lord, Take My Hand,” his favorite hymn, as the opening anthem.“Precious Lord, take my hand, bring thy child home at last, where the strife and the pain all are past,” one verse read. “I have dreamed a great dream that thy love shall rule our land: Precious Lord, precious Lord, take my hand.”“Powerful remarks,” said Julian K. Braxton, Ed.M. ’99, a history teacher at the Winsor School in Boston, following the service.Braxton, whose father grew up in Alabama, said he attended Morning Prayers as a way to remember his father and “all the foot soldiers in the Civil Rights Movement.” He praised Faust, saying, “I thought her remarks were quite powerful because it’s about action. The movement was about action, and she, in her own way, created some.”Harvard President Drew Faust — Friday, March 6 | Morning PrayersHarvard President Drew Faust led Morning Prayers on the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery march to offer reflections on her trip there as an undergraduate. She decided to answer the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call to join protesters from across the country, and now understands her participation as a decisive moment in her life.For the text version of her speech, visit President Faust’s website.last_img read more

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