Monthly Archives: September 2019

Aaron Hernandezs Fiancée to Share Her Story on Dr

Shayanna Jenkins-Hernandez, the fiancée of former New England Patriots Aaron Hernandez, and his child, Arielle. (Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via AP, Pool, File)BOSTON (AP) — The fiancée of former NFL player Aaron Hernandez says she thought his suicide was a hoax.Shayanna Jenkins-Hernandez says in an interview on “Dr. Phil” scheduled to air next week that she thought “some cruel person” was playing a trick on her when she heard Hernandez hanged himself in his prison cell on April 19, days after he was acquitted of a double murder. He was still serving a life sentence for another killing.Jenkins-Hernandez said her last conversation with the former New England Patriots player was positive and she “felt like we were looking so bright.”She also addresses rumors about Hernandez’s purported secret love life and whether she thinks he killed himself so she could collect millions of dollars.The interview with Dr. Phillip McGraw is scheduled to air Monday and Tuesday. read more

A No 16 Seed Will Win But Dont Bet On It

Upsets, upsets and more upsets. Every year, they help drive the NCAA Tournament to a special place in our sports culture. And yet, despite 128 opportunities, we still haven’t seen the king of all upsets — a “lowly” No. 16 seed has yet to knock off a No. 1 seed in the men’s tournament. Yet the math says three No. 16 seeds should have beaten a No. 1 by now. So why hasn’t it happened? In the film above, we explore that question and discuss whether you should expect the ultimate upset to happen this year.Film directed by Jason Reid. Produced by Adam Brown and Jason Reid. Check out our March Madness predictions.CORRECTION (March 14, 2:35 p.m.): An earlier version of this video misidentified Santa Clara University as part of the University of California public college system. It is not. read more

The NBA Player Whos So Good At Taking Charges We Created a

Anthony TolliverSacramento544277.7% At first glance, Sacramento Kings forward Anthony Tolliver is an NBA player with little that sets him apart. In an earlier era, his range might have been a defining characteristic given his height, but now that seemingly every big man has a jumper, he doesn’t even have that. The most remarkable part of the 31-year-old’s resume is how long it is. Tolliver has played for nine teams — almost a third of the NBA — during his nine-year stint in the association.1Tolliver became the ninth player in league history to play for at least that many NBA teams during his first nine seasons, according to Basketball-Reference.com. The other eight? Ish Smith, Lou Amundson, Mike James, Drew Gooden, Kevin Ollie, Damon Jones, Tony Brown and Tony Massenburg. Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/tollivercharge2.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/tollivercharge4.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.A number of other players around the league have struggled in this area just as much as Tolliver has succeeded in it. Toronto Raptors center Jonas Valanciunas has drawn just one charge but has been called for 16 blocking fouls, a Charge Rate of 6 percent. Milwaukee Bucks All-Star Giannis Antetokounmpo has been almost just as bad, inducing one charge in 13 tries, for an 8 percent Charge Rate. Minnesota’s Cole Aldrich, Philadelphia’s Dario Saric, Toronto’s Lucas Nogueira and Brooklyn’s Joe Harris have combined to go 0-for-36 in drawing charges this season, highlighting just how tough it can be for some players to persuade officials to side with them in bang-bang scenarios.Tolliver knows he’s good at this very particular task. “I just try to be smart about it, and pick my spots. Someone like Ersan is really aggressive about it, and he’ll jump in front of somebody every single time,” Tolliver said of Ersan Ilyasova, a former Pistons teammate, who leads the NBA in charges but sports a considerably lower Charge Rate than Tolliver, at 61 percent the past three years. “Nine times out of 10, guys know [Ilyasova’s] gonna try to take the charge, so they adjust to that and go after his shoulder to make him look like he’s not squared4Tolliver was also complimentary of his ex-teammate’s ability to draw charges, saying Ilyasova “is incredible at anticipating.” [properly]. But keeping the offensive player on his toes can make you more effective.”The other thing that helps? Tolliver says he doesn’t flail or flop. He argued that it’s not necessary to, because of the way he takes contact.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/tollivercharge9.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.“I don’t just fall because I get bumped or whatever. I try to absorb the bumps. When I get hit, it’s usually the type where you say, ‘Man, you must’ve really gotten run over,’” Tolliver explained. “When you look at someone like Marcus Smart, he tries to sell [charges] sometimes by flailing, but it’s not just him. DeMarcus5Tolliver said he and Cousins — his former teammate in Sacramento — came into the season talking smack about which player would draw more charges this season. Cousins holds a pretty sizable advantage, even though Tolliver has won a greater percentage of calls in collision scenarios. flails, too, and as a result, he doesn’t get some calls that he should get, because refs are trying to make a decision: ‘Did he get hit, or is he just trying to pull a fast one on me?’”Much of how Tolliver is programmed to think on defense stems from his time at Creighton, where then-Bluejays coach Dana Altman6Now the coach at Oregon often preached the importance of drawing charges. Under Altman’s direction, Creighton ran frequent practice drills teaching players how to properly take charges. And because of the coach’s emphasis on drawing charges in practice, the program seemingly began paying more attention to the skill in games. Rob Anderson, the team’s longtime sports information director, said he began manually tracking the metric — which isn’t kept by the NCAA — along with a stat spotter in 2002.Tolliver said drawing charges wasn’t a focus for him when he first got to Creighton, and numbers seem to bear that out, as he didn’t take any charges during his freshman season. But from his second year on, it became routine to see him morph into a human bowling pin, as he drew nine and 17 charges as a sophomore and junior, respectively, before drawing 23 charges — the same total as the rest of his team combined — in his senior year.7All the numbers come from Anderson’s tracking.“I took those drills to heart, and [drawing charges] became a major part of the way I play,” said Tolliver, who began his career at Creighton shortly after Cavaliers sharpshooter Kyle Korver finished there. (Korver also played for Altman, and is very good at drawing charges. He’s gotten the call on 11 of his 17 collisions this year — four more than the league average would suggest he should have — and drew the call on all nine of his collisions during the 2013 season.)Of course none of this means that being skilled at taking charges is the same thing as being a good defender. Tolliver himself, merely a decent stopper, would be the first person to tell you that. And the fact that Sacramento — tied for the NBA’s fourth-worst defense — manages to get 4 points worse per 100 plays on D when Tolliver is playing illustrates that no amount of charge-taking would make the Kings good on that end of the floor.Still, there is an art to how he goes about taking charges — both to prompt refs to side with him, and to avoid getting seriously hurt during the collisions. The key, according to Tolliver, is to set your feet, then begin falling as soon as the driving player makes contact with you, and not a millisecond before.“If you launch yourself backwards as soon as the contact hits you, the ref can see you getting hit without you having to take the full brunt of it,” he said. “Guys mess up because they start falling before they get hit.”But any way you slice it, taking a charge is going to be uncomfortable, he said. The main objective, aside from winning the call, is to avoid a potentially serious injury.“You can get really hurt if you don’t know how to take one. Even if you do know how, it’s gonna hurt. It just doesn’t feel good,” he said, adding that teammates asked him if he was OK after taking a knee to the chest from Oklahoma City’s Steven Adams. “I told them, ‘Yeah: I know how to fall,’” he said.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/tollivercharge6.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/tollivercharge7.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Whereas other players might not be good at taking charges, or simply may not want to, Tolliver feels as if he has no choice but to play to his strengths in hopes of finding a more permanent NBA home. So that means relying on his ability to draw fouls in a physically taxing way.“Fans don’t care about that sort of stuff; you’re not gonna get any glory out of that,” he said of charges. “At least by making a pass, you might get an assist. You can get something out of that. With a charge, I get a bruise or two out of it.”But maybe now, with more statistical information at our disposal, Tolliver’s nearly flawless ability to draw charges will get the credit it deserves.Neil Paine assisted with research for this piece.Check out our latest NBA predictions.VIDEO: How the Villanova and Duke losses shook the bracket Draymond GreenGolden State433069.7 Dennis SchröderAtlanta493367.3 Gorgui DiengMinnesota703651.4 This season, Tolliver has been almost automatic, drawing 10 charge calls in 12 collisions for an eye-popping 83 percent success rate2The charge, block and collision statistics for this story were last updated March 14.. He’s won five more calls than you’d expect the average player to earn in those same 12 situations.3His ratios have been impressive in past years, too: In 2014-15, for instance, he drew 19 charges against just four blocking calls. Marcus SmartBoston764153.9 Kemba WalkerCharlotte715070.4 Leaguewide charge rate is 40 percent. Excludes players with fewer than 30 charges drawn the past three years. As of games played on March 14.Sources: NBA Miner, Basketball-Reference.com, BigDataBall Players who had the greatest share of collisions called as charges since the 2014-15 season Ersan IlyasovaAtlanta1499161.0 Marreese SpeightsLos Angeles1016261.3 Monta EllisIndiana834959.0 Devin HarrisDallas814758.0 The Kings’ Anthony Tolliver is the master of the charge. Thearon W. Henderson / Getty Images Aron BaynesDetroit783139.7 But there is something else that could distinguish Tolliver: a stat that could unveil the undrafted journeyman’s best skill. The only problem is that it hasn’t been invented yet.The fuel of this stat: collisions, particularly when a ballhandler is barreling his way toward the basket despite a defender standing in his way. If those collisions make their way into the stat sheet, they usually go one of two ways: a charge call on the offender or a blocking foul on the defender. Players such as DeMarcus Cousins, Ersan Ilyasova and Marreese Speights have dominated the leaderboard of charges drawn in years past — and this year — according to NBA Miner, an advanced stat site that has tracked charge numbers for several seasons.But shouldn’t we be interested in more than just how many charges a player draws? The raw number doesn’t tell the whole story because it’s not speaking to a player’s success rate. If a defender draws a ton of charges, but gets whistled for nearly as many blocking calls, then the fouls essentially negate the turnovers he creates.With that in mind, I decided to take a more holistic look at things by creating “Charge Rate,” a simple stat that measures how efficiently a player draws charges. All it entails is dividing a player’s total of charges drawn by the total number of whistled collisions he’s been involved in; a number we can generate by incorporating the blocking fouls he’s been called for. At the top of the list was Tolliver, who has been the NBA’s best player at drawing charges while not getting whistled for blocking.Over the past three seasons, Tolliver’s garnered 42 charges in 54 total collisions, a Charge Rate of 78 percent; easily the best mark among players who’ve taken at least 30 charges since the start of the 2014-15 season. For context, consider that the average NBA player this season has a Charge Rate of just 40 percent, according to the collision counts on BigDataBall, which logs play-by-play data. DeMarcus CousinsNew Orleans1198268.9 Donatas MotiejunasNew Orleans794050.6 PLAYERTEAMNUM. OF COLLISIONSNUM. OF CHARGESCHARGE RATE Ryan AndersonHouston623150.0 Greg MonroeMilwaukee613862.2 Kyle LowryToronto714461.9 Luis ScolaBrooklyn693753.6 Thaddeus YoungIndiana663451.5 read more

Commentary Covering mens tennis shows hope in otherwise scandalridden sports world

Stop what you are doing. Turn on ESPN. What do you see? A slew of NCAA sanctions, fake girlfriends, falsification of academic records and abusive coaches chucking basketballs at players’ heads floods the screen. It is enough to make even the most extreme college sports fan sit down and do some soul-searching about the future of their fandom. Admittedly, I myself fell victim to this epidemic. A lifelong college sports die-hard, I had to actively avoid watching collegiate sports through the lens of a bitter skeptic – just waiting for the next story to break that sends the program, the player or the coach toppling. The sanctity of college sports for me was dying, and dying fast. Fortunately, the road back to the former glory of my fandom began this semester, although it started off with Ohio State redshirt junior Peter Kobelt almost hospitalizing me with a 130 mph tennis serve. When I was assigned to write for the OSU men’s tennis team for The Lantern at the start of Spring Semester, I fought mixed feelings. I was excited to be steering clear of football and basketball, hopefully sparing myself from the possibility of uncovering anything that would crush the remaining Buckeye fan in me, but I was nervous to be covering a sport that I knew as much about as my seventh grade gym class had taught me. My first day on the job consisted of getting lost on the way to a building I’d never heard of and arrived 20 minutes late. Flustered, I entered practice, and was greeted by Kobelt’s serve grazing my right arm. This game was already much more intense than I had expected. My first interview that day with coach Ty Tucker was ill-prepared and probably full of questions that a seventh grade student in gym class would ask about the game of tennis. I wonder why. Honestly, it’s nothing short of a miracle that the team entrusted me to report on their season after that day. More than three months later, the tennis team is in the tail end of its regular season. As a sports reporter, I have grown immensely during that time. I now can say with confidence that I can accurately comprehend the scoreboard at a tennis match. But I’ve also learned a few other things. The players on the OSU men’s tennis team love what they do, and they do it well: Tucker has coached the Buckeyes to seven consecutive Big Ten regular season titles, six more Big Ten tournament crowns and a decade-long home win streak (which, by the way, is the longest home win streak in NCAA sports), and has barely made a peep about it. If I were not badgering him with questions all semester long, I am pretty sure he would not talk about it at all. The humility he emulates trickles down to his players. These guys are here to play tennis, and it shows. The players love each other, too: It took me a while to realize, but the tennis team is comprised of the most random assortment of players ever. There are four international players on the 11-man roster. To the naked, untrained eye, you would think the men had known each other their entire lives, and not just during their time at OSU. Their chemistry off the court is equally, if not more obvious and impressive, than when they are on the court. The players use their game to capture what’s special about collegiate sports: This is my favorite part. On Friday, when the team captured its 164th straight home victory and officially went 10 years without a home loss, the celebration that followed was what many would consider uneventful. There was no confetti falling from the ceiling or camera flashbulbs firing, but what there was were a group a college kids running around, laughing and throwing arms around each other while their head coach smirked at them off to the side. Several fans cheered in the bleachers, but they were mostly parents of players. The energy in the room, though, was contagious – even palpable. The players were ecstatic, and they didn’t need a fat paycheck or swarm of media attention to evoke it. Maybe it’s just me, but that’s what a college sports team should be at its core. It’s what I now believe many teams at many schools across the country must look like. It just took a lesser-publicized sport, men’s tennis, to remind me of that. Consider my faith in college athletics restored. read more

Ohio State womens soccer looks toward trip to Penn State

Then-freshman forward Lindsay Agnew (18) heads the ball during a game against Eastern Michigan Aug. 25, 2013. OSU won 2-1 in OT.Lantern file photoFollowing a week of practice, the Buckeyes seem to have replaced the bad taste in their mouths left from a late-game collapse against Purdue.OSU (4-4-0, 1-1-0) enters Friday’s game at No. 8 Penn State (6-1-0, 2-0-0) with a chance to regain momentum and finish its three-game road swing on the winning side.“We’re excited about it,” OSU coach Lori Walker said. “It’s always a tough road trip since it’s a lot of time on the bus, but it’s a single game this weekend so we’ll get a little bit of rest afterwards.”The trip from OSU to Penn State comes in at about 325 miles.Putting together their “flashes of brilliance” and finding consistency in their game will be the keys for the Buckeyes this weekend, Walker said.OSU allowed two goals in the final 10 minutes of last Sunday’s 3-1 loss to Purdue.“Our first half against Purdue was really good soccer … then we just came out pretty flat in the second half,” said senior midfielder Ellyn Gruber, who did not play in the game because of an injury. “Being able to put two halves together is very important right now.”Penn State is statistically a first-half team, having outscored its opponents 9-1 in first half this season.The Nittany Lions, led by junior forward Mallory Weber, are on a three-game winning streak following shutout victories against Purdue and Indiana last weekend.Nearing the midway point of the season, it’s those players with the least experience who have been leading the Buckeyes. Freshman midfielder Nikki Walts and freshman forward Sammy Edwards have combined for four goals and three assists this season. Walker lauded the play of her point-scoring first-years, but she also praised the work of their classmate, midfielder Sydney Dudley.“(Dudley’s) sort of a lone hero right now that’s doing all the grunt work and not getting some of the glory,” Walker said.Dudley played two full matches for OSU as a defensive midfielder last weekend.The Buckeyes’ defense was especially strong against Purdue, Gruber said.Sophomore Lindsay Agnew’s move from forward to defender has helped solidify OSU’s backline. Agnew made the switch earlier this season when injuries began to thin the Buckeyes’ depth on defense.“I think that (Agnew) is going to be good anywhere on the field,” junior defender Marisa Wolf said. “She is very patient on the ball and is able to approach the ball with confidence.”The Buckeyes’ patience on defense will be critical to their success against Penn State, Walker said.Kickoff is scheduled for 6 p.m. Friday in State College, Pa. read more

Logan Stieber finishes decorated Ohio State career with fourth national title

OSU redshirt-senior Logan Stieber reacts after winning his 4th consecutive NCAA title by beating Edinboro’s Mitchell Port in the 141-pound championship match during the NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships on March 21 in St. Louis. Credit: Courtesy of TNSEach year, 330 wrestlers compete for a National Championship. Since 1929, when national championships were officially first handed out, only three had won four individual titles.That number rose to four on Saturday when Ohio State redshirt-senior Logan Stieber accomplished the feat for himself. But even after inking his name in the history books, Stieber’s time on the mat isn’t over.The celebration won’t last long as the Monroeville, Ohio, native sets his sights on the World Team and, ultimately, the 2016 Olympics.“I’ll be able to take a week and a half off, and let my body rest and start lifting again and I’ll get three weeks of hard freestyle training in and be ready for the U.S. Open,” Stieber said.His title puts him alongside Cael Sanderson (Iowa State, 1999-2002), Kyle Dake (Cornell, 2010-13) and Pat Smith (Oklahoma State, 1990-1992, 1994) in the elite group of wrestlers to win four NCAA titles. Stieber accumulated a 119-3 record as a Buckeye, and he became the first OSU wrestler to tally four Big Ten individual crowns as well.Logan’s father, Jeff, said he was happy to see his son’s hard work pay off in his last tournament at OSU.“I’m extremely proud and happy for him,” he said. “To see all the hard work he’s put in pay off is amazing. Winning a team title was one of Logan’s biggest goals and he was able to get his fourth along with it. You couldn’t ask for a better ending.”The four-time Ohio state champion at Monroeville High School finished the year 29-0, marking his second undefeated season, and leading OSU to its first team title in school history. He won the NCAA Most Dominant Wrestler and the NWCA Most Outstanding Wrestler awards along the way.As much individual success as Stieber has had, he continued to give credit to those around him and said he wants to do everything in his power to help them achieve their goals.“It means so much,” Stieber said of the team title. “It’s just hard to put into words. It’s something we’ve wanted so bad. Our coaches, they’ve been sick. They’re so anxious, so nervous, they want to win so bad. Everyone wants to win so bad. I’m happy to be a part of this team.”His coach, Tom Ryan, said he wanted to see Stieber leave the program the right way and that he has put this team in the right direction.“To think that this little kid from a small farm town in Monroeville, Ohio, did what he did, is pretty awesome, pretty amazing,” Ryan said. “I’m so happy for him and his family, and they believed early on in the process of us getting to the point we are. And now he can pass the torch to the other guys.”Stieber said people think he’s putting on a front when asked about the pressure that surrounds him, but he continues to block out all nervousness and is never affected.“This has been so much fun,” Stieber said. ”I haven’t been nervous at all. I was nervous for Kyle Snyder, I was nervous for Nathan Tomasello. In my match, if I have an inch of nervousness, I push it out right away. And this is fun. It’s like wrestling in the practice room. I really, really enjoy it. And it’s a little bit of relief to be done and be able to, I guess, celebrate with my family and friends.”After enjoying his individual success and that of the people around him, the four time All-American will go down as the most decorated wrestler to yet don the scarlet and gray. read more

Football JT Barrett named Big Ten Player of the Week

Redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) runs the ball in the second quarter against Nebraska in Memorial Stadium on Oct. 14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorFollowing his seven-touchdown performance in No. 6 Ohio State’s win against Nebraska, quarterback J.T. Barrett was named Big Ten Offensive Player of the Week Monday morning.Barrett has been named conference player of the week on eight occasions, the third-most ever. If he wins it again, he will tie former Wisconsin running back Ron Dayne and former Michigan quarterback Denard Robinson for the most career times being honored with the award.The redshirt senior completed 27-of-33 for 325 yards and five touchdowns, adding 48 rushing yards and two touchdowns on the ground in the Buckeyes’ 56-14 victory. He tied the school record — which he set in last year’s game against Bowling Green — for most touchdowns accounted for in a single game with seven scores.Barrett picked up his 32nd career win Saturday which gave him sole possession of the second-most victories by a Buckeye quarterback.Barrett and Ohio State do not play this weekend, but return to action against No. 2 Penn State at 3:30 p.m. Oct. 28 at Ohio Stadium. read more

George Galloway pelted with glitter at University of Aberdeen talk

first_imgSomeone calling themselves “Trans” and an “anarchist” led a five person attack on me on the platform at Aberdeen University. I continued.— George Galloway (@georgegalloway) November 22, 2016 Police were called to a university talk by George Galloway after protesters showered him with glitter.The firebrand politician said his pregnant wife jumped to his defence when the incident happened as he addressed students at the University of Aberdeen.Mr Galloway said he was left feeling “a little unwell” after the “unknown substance” got in his eyes and lungs, but continued with the talk nonetheless, albeit covered in glitter.Footage acquired by the Mirror Online appears to show several people carrying placards walk in front of the stage where the politician, wearing his trademark fedora, is on his feet. The video then seems to show a shower of gold, then green glitter being thrown in the air.A woman can be seen leaping over the desk towards the stage in an apparent attempt to apprehend the culprits and a scuffle breaks out, with a woman repeatedly shouting: “Who did that?”Mr Galloway tweeted later: He later added:  Few weeks go by when the “identity politics” crowd don’t strike one campus or another either physically or with their “no platform” demands.— George Galloway (@georgegalloway) November 22, 2016 Police Scotland told the Mirror officers had attended High Street in Old Aberdeen after reports of a disturbance.Later, Police Scotland said in a statement: “We can confirm that officers attended reports of a disturbance in High Street, Old Aberdeen, at 7.45pm on November 22.”Inquiries are at an early stage and we have have not spoken to the individual concerned.”center_img Feeling better thanks to all; just needed a good shower. Thought not as much as the “Student Left” who attacked me & tried vainly to stop me— George Galloway (@georgegalloway) November 23, 2016 I know have an unknown substance in my eyes and lungs and feel a little unwell. But the struggle continues:-)— George Galloway (@georgegalloway) November 22, 2016 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

British rover will go to Mars despite worrying crash landing says European

first_imgThe Schiaparelli probe crashed on Mars in November  The Schiaparelli probe crashed on Mars in November  Experts have said lessons would be learned from the loss, caused by a glitch that meant the probe sensed it had landed when still more than a mile above the planet’s surface.The Trace Gas Orbiter spacecraft which carried Schiaparelli to Mars is said to be functioning well. Next year it will start sniffing the planet’s atmosphere for trace gases including methane, which may indicate the presence of life.David Parker, the agency’s director of human spaceflight and robotic exploration, said: “The UK has provided the amount of funding requested for the space station and indeed has made some indications about longer term commitment as well, so it was positive.“The UK has to pay its way on the ISS to have any hope of another British astronaut following in the footsteps of Tim Peake.” A European mission to land a rover on Mars will go ahead despite a test run ending in failure last month.The European Space Agency (Esa) announced on Friday that member states had agreed to provide the 440 million euro (£370 million) needed to ensure the future of ExoMars Rover, which is currently being built at Airbus in Stevenage.The future of the project looked in doubt after a probe designed to make a test landing on the Red Planet crashed into the surface in November.However European science ministers decided to back the mission at a pivotal Esa council meeting in Lucerne, Switzerland.The space agency’s director general, Jan Woerner, said: “Today I am very confident that we will do it … We need to work hard because it’s not only some rover, we have the payloads from different sources – all of this has to pack together.”It’s not an easy thing, but we are confident that we will succeed.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.center_img The ExoMars orbiter is currently orbiting Mars taking samples of the atmosphere  The ExoMars orbiter is currently orbiting Mars taking samples of the atmosphere  The mission, the second stage of a two-part programme costing 1.3 billion euro (£1.09 billion), is due to land a rover on the Red Planet in 2021 to drill into the Martian soil and look for biochemical traces of living or dead microbes.But the ExoMars Rover has had a difficult history and come close to being abandoned on more than one occasion.Originally it was to have been a joint enterprise with Nasa, but the American space agency pulled out and a new partnership was formed with Russia’s agency, Roscosmos.In May, the launch date was put back two years because of problems with delivering hardware.But the mission suffered its most serious setback in October when the demonstrator lander Schiaparelli, designed to test the rover’s landing system, crashed on the surface of Mars.last_img read more

Company secretary traumatised by Tunisia terror attack stole £90k from employer

first_imgBy doing so she betrayed her boss Helen Standing, who had even allowed her to live rent-free in one of her properties to help her recover from financial difficulties after her first husband died and she became caught up in a spiral of gambling debts and pay-day loans.When the thefts came to light she sent her boss a confession by text, saying: “I’m sorry, I will pay them back. I was desperate and so ashamed Helen, I had debts backing up and stole the money.”I know you have been nothing but good to me. I’m a disgrace and I have to live with this for the rest of my life.”Smith, who pleaded guilty, swayed from side to side in the dock as prosecutor Joe Allman described how an external accountant had reviewed the business accounts of the company, Helen Standing Ltd, and asked for an explanation of payments made to two payees. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A company secretary traumatised after witnessing the 2015 Tunisian terror shootings siphoned off £90,000 from her employer to pay crippling debts.Donna Louise Smith, 40, who was said in court to be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder after witnessing the beach attack, was given a 16-month prison sentence suspended for two years.Preston Crown Court heard that Smith, of Ashton, Lancs, stole the cash over an 18-month period, making more than 400 payments to herself from the estates management company where she had worked for 15 years. Donna Smith witnessed the Tunisian beach shootings in 2015 and is now suffering from PTSD Donna Smith witnessed the Tunisian beach shootings in 2015 and is now suffering from PTSDCredit:Ben Lack Photography Ltd After discovering Smith was paying money into her own and her husband’s accounts Miss Standing contacted the defendant for an explanation and Miss Smith responded by text, apologising and admitting the theft.In subsequent messages she said she did not want to leave her kids, but that she would go to the police station. She revealed bailiffs had attended her address with court orders.Mitigating Bob Golinski said: “It’s clearly a significant breach of trust.”The worst aspect of this is that she broke the trust of her friend, someone with whom she had a very longstanding working relationship and who had placed a significant degree of trust in her.”The background to her debt is a curious one. She does have a history of mental health difficulties since her teenage years and most recently she has been diagnosed with PTSD following her presence at the dreadful shootings in Tunisia.”She lost her first husband. She fell into gambling which led to pay day loans which led to difficulties in repaying those, and the solution she found was through her employment.”Helen Standing Ltd, which is linked to the pub trade and based at the South Preston Office Village, Bamber Bridge, did not wish to comment. A probe found they were the bank accounts of the defendant and her husband.He added: “Miss Smith was the management accountant and also the secretary and one of her daily roles was to pay bills and to manage the cash flow from one of the company accounts.”She had known Miss Standing for many years as she first came to work for her on a youth training scheme.”On February 7, 2011, she moved into a property which Miss Standing owned with her husband Neil.”In 2013 Miss Standing attended her wedding and she was aware Miss Smith had financial difficulties. To help her out of those she allowed her to live in the property the majority of the time without paying any rent.”last_img read more

Segregated communities fuelling rise in terror threat warns counterterror chief

first_imgMr Basu went on to say that the dual issue of terrorists returning from fighting abroad and those who were unable to leave Britain in order to fight, meant the threat is “now in our midst”, the Daily Mail reported.He added that borders and ports were “porous”, with “a lack of biometrics and advanced passenger information” which made them vulnerable. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Isolated communities and illegal Islamic schools are a “breeding ground” for terrorism, a senior police chief has said, as he warned the security services are investigating 600 extremist plots.Neil Basu, the Metropolitan Police’s counter-terror chief, said that the nature of the threat the UK faced has shifted, warning that the main danger came from extremists “in our midst”.Mr Basu highlighted the risk posed by illegal schools, saying: “segregated, isolated communities, unregulated education and home schooling are a breeding ground for extremist and future terrorists”.The Met’s deputy assistant commissioner also revealed that the intelligence services were currently investigating 600 terror plots, of which 60 were opened in the past six weeks alone. In July, Cressida Dick, the Met’s commissioner, warned that 500 investigations were active.Speaking  during the Police Superintendents’ Association conference yesterday, Mr Basu said counter-terror officers currently open more investigations than they close each week.He added that there were also weaknesses in the country’s borders and called for much stringent checks on arrivals as he warned the UK’s terror threat level would remain at severe for at least the next five years.He said: “It is not going to change. This was truly a summer like no other, it was truly a shift and not a spike, it is truly a new norm that we face.”last_img read more

Carnival Queen competition dubbed outdated as it fails to attract a single

first_imgA message from the Whitsable Carnival on Facebook notifying followers that no girls came forward to be crowned queen It seems the reign of the Carnival Queen is finally over after an “outdated” competition designed to crown the next monarch of Whitstable failed to attract a single person.The organisers of the Whitstable Carnival in Kent said that no girls turned up to the carnival court selection event at Whitstable Castle last Sunday.The job of a carnival queen is to represent the town for a year and participate in local events and fundraisers – as well as attended carnivals across the county during the year.However, after the mass no-show the competition, which has been held every year since 1897, has announced it will break with tradition and accept applications from boys. The competition, which in the past has been entered by up to 50 wannabe carnival queens aged between 13 and 16 – and their two accompanying ‘princesses’ – is now urging boys to apply to become carnival kings at the rescheduled event.  “People have been saying the carnival court is old-fashioned. The problem is that lots of people think it’s a beauty contest, which it definitely is not.”However, not everyone was as enthusiastic about the competition.Morag Warren wrote: “I wouldn’t want my daughter going for this tbh… makes me a bit squeamish.”A beauty parade for 13-16 year old girls? The carnival could and should be brilliant without this relic. Quite chuffed that Whitstable parents have rejected this.”A message from the 2011 Whitstable Carnival Queen Carol Simmons, the secretary of Whitstable Carnival Assocation, said: “It’s always just been girls in the past – we’ve never had boys before.”Mainly because boys might not want to sit on a float and wave at the people of Whitstable. “We’re happy to accept boys as contestants too, if they wish to apply. We need to have a meeting to talk about it, because we have nothing in place to deal with this. A message from the Whitsable Carnival on Facebook notifying followers that no girls came forward to be crowned queen Margaret Maggie Honey wrote: “This idea of being princesses is outdated, rejuvenate carrnival for the 21stC.”Sonja Weed asked why the children had to be called “princesses” and suggested the term “young ambassadors” instead.”That’s most likely more appropriate for what they do, more appropriate for this day and age and would look amazing on a CV?,” she said.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

DVLA hands out millions of car owners details to private parking firms

The number of private firms legally entitled to receive the sensitive information has risen five-fold in just six years as a result of a law change put in place to crack down on rogue operators.  The DVLA is handing over the car registration details of millions of owners to private parking firms signed up to a trade body for just a few hundred pounds. According to the RAC Foundation, the motoring think tank, 119 car parking management businesses are now able to access vehicle keeper records held by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency. The companies pay the DVLA just £2.50 for each record check but the data enables the firms to then pursue motorists for parking fines routinely set at £100…. read more

Nick Grimshaws Radio 1 Breakfast Show sheds hundreds of thousands of listeners

Chris Evans also saw a drop in his listening figures in the first three months of 2018, with his Radio 2 breakfast show drawing 9.1 million a week, down from 9.4 million the quarter before. The station as a whole also shed listeners, pulling in 9.5 million a week in the first quarter of 2018, compared with 9.8 million in the final quarter of 2017. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Radio 1 breakfast show has been defended by BBC bosses after figures showed it had shed hundreds of thousands of listeners since the start of the year.The show, presented by Nick Grimshaw, has recorded its second lowest audience figures since current records began.The programme hosted by the DJ lost 600,000 listeners in the first quarter of 2018, new research shows.Grimshaw pulled in 5.1 million listeners a week in the first three months of the year, compared with 5.7 million a week in the last quarter of 2017, according to the latest figures from audience research body Rajar.The quarter-on-quarter drop of 11 per cent is the second largest dip since Grimshaw took over the breakfast show – the largest was between October and December 2012 and January and March 2013, when the audience fell by 14 per cent.Last year the show plunged to its lowest listening figures since he took over the slot, dropping below five million in the third quarter of 2017, the first time in his five-year tenure.Ben Cooper, controller BBC Radio 1, 1Xtra & Asian Network, said: “Radio 1 has reinvented how the BBC reaches young people in the digital age.”He added: “Radio 1 remains the biggest and most relevant youth station in the UK, with over a third of all 15 to 24-year-olds listening each week.” read more

Turbans are this seasons showstopping new look declares Duchess of Cambridges hatmaker

Jane Taylor has made hats for the Duchess of Cambridge Turbans are not unique to Sikhs, with senior Islamic officials, Hindu priests and people in some African cultures also wearing them. Historians suggest that Guru Gobind Singh told followers to wear the head covering, also known as a dastar, as a unifying symbol of Sikh faith but also to elevate them all to a level of nobility in the eyes of God. In modern society some Sikh men do not wear a turban, arguing that it is not mandatory, while some Sikh women have started to wear them, in a break with tradition.  Jane Taylor has made hats for the Duchess of CambridgeCredit:Zak Hussein/Corbis Ms Taylor, 36,  who makes hats for the Duchess of Cambridge, Sophie Wessex, Zara Tindall, Princess Eugenie and Lady Louise Windsor, told the Sunday Telegraph: “The Turban is a completely new look this season and a real showstopper. We have created ours out of buntal (a mix of straw and silk) but you can see fabric twisted versions as well. “Easily worn to cover your ears, it’s a chic and timeless headpiece that can be worn during daytime teamed with jeans and a white top for a comfortable style, or at a special evening occasion.”Some Sikh leaders embraced the trend, suggesting that it could normalise the turban so Sikhs themselves are “stared at” less.  It is traditionally worn as a symbol of religious identity, rather than a fashion statement.But according to the Duchess of Cambridge’s hatmaker, this year’s “showstopper” trend is set to be the turban.Jane Taylor, one of the country’s leading milliners, has declared the turban a “chic and timeless headpiece” that is “a completely new look this season”.The hatmaker’s prediction comes amid growing controversy around so-called “cultural appropriation” – where one culture adopts elements of another.Earlier this year, the fashion designer Gucci attracted criticism for sending supermodels wearing turbans down the catwalk.British Sikhs, including the BBC presenter Tina Daheley, attacked the brand for turning the religious garment into a fashion accessory at a time where Sikhs are still persecuted for practicing their religion, and subjected to racist attacks. Jane Taylor has declared the turban a 'chic and timeless headpiece' The Sikh Coalition  responded to the controversy by tweeting: “The Sikh turban is a sacred article of faith, @gucci, not a mere fashion accessory. #appropriation”The Duchess gets first pick of Ms Taylor’s new styles, which she holds for some years before releasing them to the public. It is not known whether she will choose to wear a turban this year.In the Western world, turbans are most commonly worn by Sikh men, who, following the teachings of the 10th and final Sikh Guru Guru Gobind Singh, do not cut their hair.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Ashish Joshi, the spokesperson for the Sikh Media Monitoring Group, “Overall, it’s a good idea because not long ago, wearing bowler hats was common – why not have a new look!“It moves the exoticism out of head gear – which could only be a good thing. If the turban becomes less unusual, Sikhs who wear turbans will not be stared at as much.”Lord Singh, who frequently represents the Sikh community in the House of Lords, said that although he is not offended by the fashion for turbans, “it would be nice if [the wearers] stood up for the principles that wearing the turban entails. They’d be welcome to get into Sikhism.”View latest offers from New Look Jane Taylor has declared the turban a ‘chic and timeless headpiece’Credit:Danny Martindale/ WireImage read more

Jonathan King used fame to lure young boys into Daimler before sexually

He would flatter them and pretend that they could help him with research or promotionRosina Cottage QC, prosecuting Dressed in a dark suit, white shirt, blue tie and colourful trainers, he appeared in court under his real name, Kenneth George King.Wearing round glasses and a bum bag, he sat expressionless in the dock as the case against him was opened on Wednesday afternoon.A jury of five men and seven women was told King denies he would ever have sex with anyone under age or force himself on someone without consent.But the prosecutor said his denials are “hollow” and told jurors he was convicted in 2001 of sexual offences against five teenage boys in the 1980s. Jurors were warned they would see pictures of a blow-up doll as well of images of naked girls during the trial.The prosecutor explained: “The reason that you have them at all is because the individual boys, at the time, said they were shown photos… of naked girls to try to encourage them to believe they were going to have sex with those girls.”The trial, which could last until August 3, continues. King, of Bayswater, central London, is standing trial at Southwark Crown Court where he denies 24 serious sexual assault charges against boys aged between 14 and 16, alleged to have taken place between 1970 and 1988. The ex-music mogul arrives at Southwark Crown Court on Wednesday Ex-DJ Jonathan King arrives at Southwark Crown Court in London Referring to the current allegations, she added: “He claims not to know or remember most of the boys, despite their photographs or letters or addresses and details still being in his home up to 30 years later, like trophies kept for his own private perusal.”The court heard King would target straight, immature boys, securing sex by showering them with gifts of records, concert tickets, meals and alcohol, as well as paying insincere compliments and making false promises.Ms Cottage said: “This case concerns sexual assaults by this defendant upon 11 teenage boys in the 1970s and 1980s.”The defendant used his position in the music industry and his fame to lure boys into his Daimler or Rolls-Royce, where he would flatter them and pretend that they could help him with research or promotion. The ex-music mogul arrives at Southwark Crown Court on WednesdayCredit:Rick Findler /PA Jonathan King wore a dark suit, colourful and a bum bag in courtCredit:Rick Findler /PA “He would then drive them to his home where he would give them alcohol and promise them sex with teenage girls and show them pornography.” Jonathan King, the former music mogul, used his fame to sexually assault teenage boys after showering them with gifts or promising sex with girls their own age, a court has heard.The convicted sex offender, 73, allegedly exploited his position in the record industry to carry out attacks on 11 teenagers as young as 14 in the 1970s and 1980s.King, an ex-pop star and producer for acts including Genesis, is said to have lured youngsters into his Daimler or Rolls-Royce cars before driving them home, where they were plied with alcohol.He also gave them presents, including records and concert tickets, showed them pornography and made false promises of sex with teenage girls, said prosecutor Rosina Cottage QC.”When they were in his power and in no position to repel his advances he would assault them,” she said. “It appears that it was a game of manipulation and power over boys aged about 13 to 16,” she said. “He would play the same routine again and again, honed for success.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Number of doctors opting for early retirement doubles amid pension clampdown

The number of GPs claiming their NHS pension on voluntary early retirement grounds increased from 198 in 2007-08 to 721 in 2016-17, while the number retiring on ill health grounds rose from 12 to 63 over the same period.Dr Rob Harwood,  chairman of the British Medical Association’s consultants committee, said: “These figures are concerning but certainly not surprising for doctors working in understaffed and under-resourced hospitals across the country.“Given the combined pressures of mounting demand, unmanageable workloads and widespread gaps in rotas, it is to be expected that doctors may ultimately choose to leave the profession early. What is most worrying, however, is the six-fold rise in those retiring early due to ill-health.”John Kell, Head of Policy at the Patients Association, said: “Patients will want to see reassurance in the forthcoming ten year plan for the NHS that there will be an adequate clinical workforce to care for them in the future. The mounting pressures on the NHS are taking a high toll on the doctors we currently have.”A Department of Health and Social Care spokesman said:   “There are near-record numbers of NHS doctors working tirelessly to make sure patients get excellent, safe care and we are committed to supporting them in the workplace. To help them balance work-life commitments, we are expanding flexible working schemes and e-rostering, and to ensure the NHS has the doctors it needs now and in the future we are increasing training places by 25 per cent.” The number retiring on ill health grounds rose from 12 to 79 over the same period.The figures show that in total, 27 per cent of hospital doctors who retired in 2017/18 did so before pension age – a rise form 14 per cent a decade before.And five per cent of retirements in 2017/18 were on grounds of ill-health, compared with 1 per cent in 2007/08.The figures were released to The BMJ by the NHS Business Services Authority in response to a freedom of information request.Overall, the number of hospital doctors choosing to take their pension rose by a fifth over the period, the figures show. Meanwhile, the total number working in the NHS rose by 21 per cent.It follows figures showing a more than tripling in the number of GPs choosing early retirement. These figures are concerning but certainly not surprising for doctors working in understaffed and under-resourced hospitalsDr Rob Harwood Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The number of hospital doctors opting for early retirement has doubled in the past decade, NHS figures show.The trend comes along side a clamp down on pensions, which cap the amount savers can amass without being taxed from £1.8m in 2012 to £1 million.Medics blamed stress, and said they were increasingly overloaded, with the statistics also showing a rising numbers taking their pension early on grounds of ill-health.The research shows the number of hospital doctors claiming their NHS pension on voluntary early retirement grounds increased from 164 in 2007/08 to 397 in 2017/18. read more

First person prosecuted for transgender hate crime says it is a waste

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The 51-year-old accountant, who still identifies as male, was prosecuted after Helen Islan, the mother of a transgender child, accused him of “outing” her son by posting a picture of him on Twitter. The first person in Britain to be charged with a transgender hate crime has warned that the police and courts are being used to stifle legitimate debate on the controversial topic. Mr Yardley was interviewed at length by Essex Police in April 2018, before a file on the case was sent to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS)…. Miranda Yardley, who was born a man but underwent gender realignment to become a woman, went on trial earlier this month after being accused of harassment by a transgender activist. read more

New IRA apologises for murder of Lyra McKee as 57yearold woman is

The gunman was aiming at police during disturbances in the Creggan when he hit the 29-year-old.Her killing has been widely condemned across the political spectrum.Lyra’s friend Sinead Quinn, who took part on Monday’s protest, said: “We have used red paint because they have blood on their hands for what has happened.”They have encouraged it, they have moulded these young people into what they are and they are standing behind them handing them guns.”They need to take responsibility today for what has happened.”They have shirked it so far by saying it was an accidental shooting. You don’t shoot accidentally.” “I want to reassure people that you don’t have to commit to anything today. I just need to speak to people to understand what they know.”We can then look at how we capture that information in the best way possible to protect those witnesses and enable me to bring the gunman who killed Lyra McKee to justice.” Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee defaced the walls of a dissident republican office in Derry with red paint Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee defaced the walls of a dissident republican office in Derry with red paintCredit:PA Police in Northern Ireland today said a 57-year-old woman had been arrested under the Terrorism Act in connection with Miss McKee’s murder.In a short statement, the PSNI did not disclose any further details about the nature of the arrest, only that she had been taken to Musgrave Serious Crime Suite. Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee defaced the walls of a dissident republican office in Derry with red paint Two teenage men initially arrested by detectives investigating the murder were later released without charge.The senior detective leading the investigation into the 29-year-old’s murder has revealed that since Miss McKee’s death more than 140 people have contacted police with information.Detective Superintendent Jason Murphy said the investigation to find her killer is continuing at a “rapid pace”. The appeal came after friends of the journalist protested by defacing an office belonging to a dissident republican group by putting red handprints on the walls of its headquarters.A number of Miss McKee’s friends walked to Junior McDaid House, where they used a pot of red paint to place handprints on the side of the office walls.A group of some six men, understood to be members of republican group Saoradh, who are associated with the New IRA, stood outside the building during the protest.PSNI officers were also present and later asked for the names of those involved in the incident.The dissident republican New IRA is being blamed for shooting Miss McKee. The New IRA has admitted responsibility for the murder of the 29 year old journalist  She added: “When you put a gun into someone’s hand and they shoot it, that’s murder. Friends of murdered journalist Lyra McKee defaced the walls of a dissident republican office in Derry with red paintCredit:PA The New IRA has admitted responsibility for the murder of journalist Lyra McKee in Londonderry, offering “full and sincere apologies” to her family and friends, as police confirmed a 57-year-old woman had been arrested under the Terrorism Act in connection with the killing.Miss McKee was shot dead during unrest in the Creggan area of Derry on Thursday night.In a statement given to The Irish News using a recognised code word, the New IRA said: “On Thursday night following an incursion on the Creggan by heavily armed British crown forces which provoked rioting, the IRA deployed our volunteers to engage.”We have instructed our volunteers to take the utmost care in future when engaging the enemy, and put in place measures to help ensure this.”In the course of attacking the enemy Lyra McKee was tragically killed while standing beside enemy forces.”The IRA offer our full and sincere apologies to the partner, family and friends of Lyra McKee for her death.” Mr Murphy said: “We’ve had a massive public positive response to the investigation since Thursday evening.”This was an attack on the community. Lyra, tragically, was a random victim and I need the public to continue to support us.”Many witnesses have contacted us to give us information that has been provided to them. More than 140 people have contacted us via our MIPP with messages, including mobile phone footage.”House-to house enquiries are continuing, and all of that is to be welcomed.”He added: “My appeal today to witnesses who haven’t come forward to us is simple. Please, come forward and have a conversation with me. Come and talk to me. The New IRA has admitted responsibility for the murder of the 29 year old journalist Credit:PA “Lyra deserves more and I am so glad there are so many people here today to see and watch these men looking at us.”They are not a representation of republican people in this town.”Those people don’t represent (republicanism). Nobody can advocate shooting into a crowd of people and shooting a 29-year-old woman dead.”People have been afraid to stand up to people like this, we are not afraid.”The group of friends have pledged to do more in Lyra’s memory.”Lyra’s McKee’s name will never be forgotten in this town,” Ms Quinn added.”We have to do it for her.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Steam trains could die out because of government crackdown on coal heritage

The comforting chug of a steam train may be left in the past under government plans to crack down on coal, heritage railway operators have warned.As the country moves towards a carbon-neutral future, officials plan to shut down every coal plant in the UK by 2025.Members of the £400m steam train industry have said they face an “uncertain future” and have asked for government help, as they fear the coal price rises that will be caused by the plant shutdown will put them out of business.Conservative councillor Thomas Smith, who drives a steam train in Norfolk said: “Every railway enthusiast needs to write to their MP, and create a big stink.”Britain is burning so little coal now it’s almost all gone from electric generation, time to tackle coal abroad and oil fuels at home…”Graeme Bunker, who works on a steam train, added: “It’s the cost of fuel not the legislation. It also includes a lot of virtue signalling when their are much bigger issues to manage than folks with open fires in the shires. In cities I see the point, but in the country it won’t be popular.”Industry groups have said a drop in demand for coal could see supply drop in the same way, which has sparked fears that prices will rise.Ian Crowder, from Gloucestershire Warwickshire Steam Railway, told the BBC: “It’s all very well the government gives us reassurances but those reassurances needs to be in legislation.”He said heritage railways were “an important tourism attraction for the UK” that bring in millions of visitors.The steam train worker added that the amount of coal used by steam trains is negligible in terms of the UK’s carbon footprint.He said: “It’s the law of unintended consequences: no-one including government wants railways to be affected but if other coal use disappears that would be the effect. UK currently uses 12m tonnes coal pa – railways use just 26,000 tonnes pa”.A Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy spokesman said: “Our policy of phasing out coal in our power system by 2025 will not restrict its use for heritage railways.”They will be able to continue to source coal either through domestic suppliers or imports.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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