Book: Darwin Centurions Join Forces Against ID Visigoths

first_imgA new book attacking intelligent design has chapters by most of the big names in evolutionary thought: Daniel Dennett, Richard Dawkins, Jerry Coyne, and others.  An introduction to the book Intelligent Thought: Science vs. the Intelligent Design Movement (ed. John Brockman, Vintage Press, May 2006), with a synopsis of each chapter, is available at The Edge.  The upshot is: materialistic Darwinism is the only scientific approach to origins, and the “bizarre” claims of “fundamentalists” with “beliefs consistent with those of the Middle Ages” must be opposed.  “The Visigoths are at the gates” of science, chanting that schools must teach the controversy, “when in actuality there is no debate, no controversy.”  You get the flavor of this book.OK, time for Battle of the Blurbs.  If they can summarize the points of each essay in a sentence or two, we can summarize some quick responses.  With apologies to Illustra, we’ll call this “Unmasking the Blustery of Lie.”Fool’s goal:  In the introduction, John Brockman is chagrined; he supposes Europeans must think Americans are “collective fools” for trying to “redefine science to include the supernatural,” right here in the 21st century.  Well, America leads, not follows, least of all the Europeans, who are busy committing mass suicide (see WND).  Since everyone is someone else’s weirdo, we’ll return the compliment and call it a draw.  Now, anything of substance you want to say, Mr. Brockman?Inferior science:  Jerry Coyne argues that “Not only is ID markedly inferior to Darwinism at explaining and understanding nature but in many ways it does not even fulfill the requirements of a scientific theory.”  And Darwinism does?  Describe for us in detail, Jerry, how Tinker Bell (01/13/2006, 09/22/2005) created endless forms most beautiful (06/29/2005) through the mystical process of speciation you wrote about (07/30/2004).  While you’re at it, tell us your feelings about the vicious atheism of your friend Dawkins (04/23/2003).  Are you claiming that science is what Darwinian science does?  Or would you allow that scientific explanations must invoke causes appropriate to their observed effects?  While puzzling over that, we’d like to hear about your peppered moth flipflop again (07/05/2002, 06/25/2004).The Good Fight:  Susskind tries to find the hidden agenda of ID.  He suspects it is “to discredit the legitimate scientific community” so as to “inconvenience if one is trying to ignore global warming, or build unworkable missile-defense systems, or construct multibillion-dollar lasers in the unlikely hope of initiating practicable nuclear fusion.”  Now, who brought politics into a discussion about science?  Is Susskind revealing that Darwinists are political leftists?  If he likes debate and dissent so much, why not debate Darwinism, then?  This red herring has nothing to do with intelligent design, and is flimsy sidestep for someone who may be missing something fundamental himself (see 08/13/2002 and 12/18/2005).  No fair misusing Biblical phrases, Lenny; St. Paul’s idea of a good fight was completely different than yours, and you would be one of the mythmakers he warned about. (II Timothy 4).Hoax Blokes:  Daniel Dennett, in his essay “The Hoax of Intelligent Design and How it Was Perpetrated,” agrees evolution hasn’t explained everything, but “intelligent design hasn’t yet tried to explain anything at all.”  This from a man who hasn’t yet realized that his Darwinian “universal acid” eats through everything, even his own rationality.  He cannot invoke rationality without plagiarizing theism.  So at least he is consistent; he employs irrationality, including the big lie.Natural creationism and other brain teasers:  Nicholas Humphrey makes the bizarre argument that since belief in special creation leads to “biologically fitter lives,” it must have evolved.  “Thus one of the particular ways in which consciousness could have won out in evolution by natural selection could have been precisely by encouraging us to believe that we have not evolved by natural selection,” he says.  If he really believed this line of argument, he would abandon natural selection and embrace special creation, to increase his fitness, so that he could pass on his selfish genes, which are just using him by playing tricks on his mind to believe things that aren’t true.  There must be a point in here, somewhere.  Could Humphrey explain why this argument is not invertible, or how he could ever know anything? (see self-refuting fallacy).And now… the evidence:  Tim White is at the bat to give us “Human evolution: the evidence.”  He says, “A denial of evolution – however motivated – is a denial of evidence, a retreat from reason to ignorance.”  Thank you for that unsolicited and mistargeted sermon.  Now, the evidence please?  Strike one (03/28/2003), two (06/11/2003), three (09/24/2004)… yer out.Fish-o-pod Transition:  Neil Shubin is pictured smug with arms akimbo, looking ready to take on challengers to his prize catch, the fish-o-pod (see 04/06/2006).  He got an extended excerpt included in this book review.  It includes the argument from bad design (dysteology), his favorite just-so story about Great Transformations, and why his find was the biggest thing in paleontological history.  One concession he makes is that mudskippers are not evolving into tetrapods – but his reason is circular; you have to believe evolution to consider it evidence.  Is Shubin as convincing as he makes himself out to be?  See Brad Harrub’s response on Apologetics Press.Intelligent Aliens?  Richard Dawkins is slain in the spirit of natural selection: “an idea whose plausibility and power hits you between the eyes with a stunning force, once you understand it in all its elegant simplicity.”  Let’s see; the fit survive, survivors are the fittest, therefore survivors survive.  Gosh, Dr. Dawkins, you’re right; I’m dumbfounded.  (See evolution songs verse 2).Darwin rejected design, so we should, too:  Frank Sulloway puts his trust in the word of Charlie: “The more extensive his reexamination became, the more he realized that the theory of intelligent design, which gave creationism its scientific legitimacy, was overwhelmingly contradicted by the available evidence.”  And what was the evidence?  Simply put, God wouldn’t have made the world this way.  Since this would require knowing the mind of God, it is a religious argument and therefore should not be taught in public school.From chance to absolutes:  It must be a fun read to see Scott Atran explain how “Nothing indicates that people who believe that life arose by chance also believe that morality is haphazard.”  That isn’t so obvious to historians of communism and Nazism.  If morality is not haphazard, what is directing the undirected process?  Could not replaying the tape end up with opposite moralities?Pinko ethics:  Steven Pinker continues the morality play: “An evolutionary understanding of the human condition, far from being incompatible with a moral sense, can explain why we have one.”  But if your moral sense outrages mine, who wins, if not the one deemed the fittest? (i.e., the side that wins through raw exercise of power).  Maybe Pinker should listen to some of his auditory cheesecake and ponder Michael Balter’s wisdom, “Some of the things that make life most worth living are not biological adaptations” (see 11/12/2004).Darwin all the way down:  Lee Smolin is not surprised that Bible-believers reject evolution, but asks this “disturbing” question: “Why do so many non-fundamentalist theologians and religious leaders have no trouble incorporating Darwin into their worldview?”  Why, indeed.  Maybe they need to study the issues.  His line “all the way down” reminds us of a story… (see turtle cosmology).Self-organizing contradictions:  Stuart Kauffman, a prophet of self-organization, sweeps away centuries of probability theory by saying it doesn’t apply to the biosphere.  That’s right, if one believes in Tinker Bell who can make all your Darwinian dreams come true.  Has Kauffman changed his mind since debating Phillip Johnson? (11/20/2001).Thus saith Lloyd:  Seth Lloyd gives us the deep thought of the day: “The universe is scientific.”  Apparently people are not, and “In societies where government or religion has tried to replace it with ideologically inspired fictions, scientists and nonscientists alike have resisted.”  Please explain the difference with Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot who tried Darwin-inspired ideologies – and when resistance was futile.CBA: Cute (blasphemous) acronyms:  Lisa Randall flippantly remarks, “We don’t have an intelligent designer (ID), we have a bungling consistent evolver (BCE).  Or maybe an adaptive changer (AC).  In fact, what we have in the most economical interpretation is, of course, evolution.”  Sorry, religious arguments are not allowed, remember?  You’re a scientism-ist.Parental guidance:  Marc D. Hauser asks a fair question: “What counts as a controversy must be delineated with care, as we want students to distinguish between scientific challenges and sociopolitical ones.”  Agreed.  Many have argued that Darwinism was symptomatic of economic and sociopolitical currents in Victorian Britain, drunk on the idea of progress during the Industrial Revolution and pinnacle of the British Empire.  Can we move on?  Now, let’s talk about scientific challenges like irreducible complexity, and other issues appropriate for the Information Age.Wonder as I wander:  Scott Sampson rhapsodizes, “Rather than removing meaning from life, an evolutionary perspective can and should fill us with a sense of wonder at the rich sequence of natural systems that gave us birth and continues to sustain us.”  Then why did your comrade Steven Weinberg say, “The more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it also seems pointless”?  What’s your point?  What is a point?  A point in this context is a vector, with magnitude and direction.  Darwinian evolution, though, is supposed to be undirected.  Tell us about the natural selection of wonder and its survival value, and where these things are pointing (if not a heat death).  No fair borrowing from the Psalms.The Darwin Party faithful are holing themselves up in their castle, shielded from debate, sending out their diatribes like cannonballs, hoping the Visigoths will just go away.  The ID party, by contrast, welcomes debate and discussion and invites their opponents to a parley (notice how their book Darwin, Design and Public Education included thoughtful chapters by critics).    The ID Visigoths feel somewhat puzzled by the savage label applied to them.  They feel quite cultured (some even enjoy Mozart: see ID the Future), and count among their chieftains many esteemed scientists like Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, James Clerk Maxwell and many others.  On the contrary, some of the tactics of their enemies seem barbaric.  All the Visigoths demand is that the Darwinians lay down their arms, confess their war crimes, and discuss truth with reason and civility.  (Good luck, heh heh.*)(Visited 19 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

admin December 19, 2019 buraha Leave a Comment

Read More

Adapting Care to Culture

first_imgJay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhDCover photo image: Creative Commons Licensing [Flickr, 35th CSSB hosts Hispanic Heritage Month observance, October 9, 2014]What are the most important factors in creating a culturally competent mental health practice?In a recent article published in Advances in Social Work, Christi Luby reviews cultural competency literature related to the military and provides a framework for increasing cultural competency [1].  The framework for developing cultural competency is an ongoing process, beginning with a self-inventory to evaluate office or individual prejudice on military issues.  Next steps include: 1) Adapting care to the military culture; 2) Increasing personal or office involvement by attending military activities; and, 3) Encouraging military member’s participation in community activities.Adapting care to the military culture may include the following steps:Consider the military mission and values. For instance, in the military culture the mission may be the most important aspect in the military member’s life.  This attitude will influence the military member’s view of his/her role in the family.Organizational structure and rank hierarchy play an important role in success of the military member at work. Providers may benefit by understanding rank and how rank influences an individual’s behavior at work, in the family, and in the community.Consider the demographics of the individual military member’s unit. Characteristics of the work group surrounding the military member may influence the available support for the individual.Become familiar with terms and idioms that are specific to the military. Communication on the client’s level is important to building a strong therapeutic relationship.Include the family when considering the culture. For instance, the family may be experiencing the stress of deployment differently than the military member and the stressors experienced by the family and their ability to cope will affect the performance of the military member.A large number of active duty military members and reservists seek mental health care in the community away from base.  By developing and maintaining cultural competency, a community clinician can develop the communication skill and knowledge to build a trusting relationship with the client that can help achieve successful outcomes.References[1] Luby, C.D. (2012). Promoting military cultural awareness in an off-post community of behavioral health and social support service providers. Advances in Social Work, 13(1), 67-82.This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

admin December 12, 2019 nhsili Leave a Comment

Read More

$2 Billion to Renovate 100 Police Stations

first_imgStory Highlights One hundred police stations are to be renovated at a cost of $2 billion under a two-year rehabilitation project being funded by the National Housing Trust (NHT).This was disclosed by Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, during his contribution to the 2019/20 Budget Debate in the House of Representatives on March 19.He pointed out that the NHT, for which he has portfolio responsibility, will partner with the Ministry of National Security and Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in executing the engagement.Mr. Holness said work on the first 11 stations is slated to commence in the 2019/20 fiscal year, and would cost approximately $1.2 billion.Among the stations are Port Antonio and Buff Bay in Portland, and the Mobile Reserve Barracks in St. Andrew, where work is already in progress.The sums earmarked to continue work at these facilities in the upcoming year are Port Antonio – $125 million, Buff Bay – $95 million, and Mobile Reserve – $89 million.The other shortlisted stations are Port Maria, St. Mary ($250 million); Savanna-la-Mar ($165 million), Little London and Frome ($60 million each) – Westmoreland; Anchovy, St. James and Lacovia, St. Elizabeth ($60 million each); Olympic Gardens ($114 million); and Spanish Town, St. Catherine ($120 million).He pointed out that based on discussions with the Ministry, it was decided that the earmarked funds could be more effectively utilised to rectify deficiencies identified at the stations.The Prime Minister said it was also determined that the undertaking would have a greater impact on communities with a higher concentration of NHT contributors, with a focus on the larger police stations.“We need to demonstrate the value we place on the service given by our security forces, and also the security of our people. One way of doing so is improving the conditions under which they work,” Mr. Holness said. He pointed out that the NHT, for which he has portfolio responsibility, will partner with the Ministry of National Security and Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) in executing the engagement. One hundred police stations are to be renovated at a cost of $2 billion under a two-year rehabilitation project being funded by the National Housing Trust (NHT). This was disclosed by Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, during his contribution to the 2019/20 Budget Debate in the House of Representatives on March 19.last_img read more

admin October 24, 2019 adurdd Leave a Comment

Read More

Eddie Redmayne joins Fantastic Beasts stars on Toronto red carpet

first_imgWhere can you find fantastic beasts?Yonge-Dundas Square isn’t a bad place to start.The bustling intersection was HQ for all things magical on Tuesday night as fans lined up in the rain to catch a glimpse of the stars of the new film from the imagination of J.K. Rowling. It opens Nov. 18. Advertisement Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is part of Harry Potter history, though only tangentially.The script was inspired by a Hogwarts textbook, with the film taking place in New York City, circa 1926. Advertisement Oscar winner Eddie Redmayne plays the protagonist, and greeted screaming Toronto fans on the red carpet.His character is Magizoologist Newt Scamander, who collects — and then loses — his magical beasts who are normally safeguarded in his leather briefcase. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

admin October 15, 2019 xdabuo Leave a Comment

Read More

Candain Standup Star Mike Birbiglia Gets Personal Again At JFL42

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: He first went into harrowing and hilarious detail about his serious sleep disorder in a 2008 off-Broadway one man show titled Sleepwalk with Me. (He’d also had bladder cancer at one point, observing in the same show, “whenever they find something, it’s never anything good, like, ‘We found something in your bladder — and it’s season tickets to the Yankees!’ ”) The painfully funny mining of his own deadly serious predicament won him fans and set the tone for live performances to come. “I started saying to myself, ‘What is this? How did I end up here?’ It’s when life becomes so strange in these rare moments in your life where you’re lucky enough that you just hope that your better instincts kick in.”Birbiglia, 39, has made a career of living off his better instincts. His low-key, homebody persona sets up jokes about the smallest of frustrations and awkward moment (“A girl offered me E at the club: ‘Have you ever done E?’ “I watch E’ ”) but it’s probably his introspective, heartfelt monologues that have held audiences spellbound for a decade.Toronto fans can take in latest standup set, which again delves into personal territory, at this year’s JFL42 festival, which starts this Thursday and runs until Sept. 30. (Birbiglia’s headliner set at the Sony Centre is set for Sept. 29.) Twitter Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The pressure was on Mike Birbiglia this summer in Montreal. He was being crowned “Standup Comedian of the Year” at the Just for Laughs comedy festival. Just to ramp up his self-consciousness, on the day of the awards, he was surrounded by comedy gold.“I’m in this room with Trevor Noah, Judd Apatow, Jim Carrey, all these people,” says Birbiglia, interviewed the day after the ceremony. Ali Wong, Craig Ferguson, Jay Baruchel and Jeff Ross are also on the dais. Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

admin October 15, 2019 vsxrnd Leave a Comment

Read More

Sweetwater Union District employee pleads not guilty to embezzlement

first_img KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Sweetwater Union District employee pleads not guilty to embezzlement Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter CHULA VISTA (CNS) – A former employee of the Sweetwater Union High School District who’s accused of embezzling more than $50,000 in money orders from the district pleaded not guilty today to embezzlement and grand theft charges.Danya Margarita Williams, 42 of Chula Vista, is accused of appropriating more than $50,000 in money orders between June 2016 and November 2017, Chula Vista police Capt. Phil Collum said. District officials discovered the alleged embezzlement in late 2017 and reported it to Chula Vista police, Collum said.As part of her job, Williams was responsible for processing money orders received for fingerprint background investigations at the district, which are required during employment screening, according to police. Each background investigation costs between $52 to $75 per applicant and the applicants pay the fee using money orders, Collum said.“Instead of processing the money in accordance with district requirements, Williams deposited the money into her personal bank account,” Collum alleged. The exact amount of money that Williams allegedly embezzled was not revealed.Williams, who faces four years in prison if convicted of all charges, was arrested last week but is out of custody on $50,000 bail. She’s due back in a Chula Vista courtroom April 16 for a readiness conference. March 12, 2019 Posted: March 12, 2019last_img read more

admin September 17, 2019 fofabvlic Leave a Comment

Read More

Vast fatberg found in sewer and the photos are a complete horror

first_img Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Share your voice $999 $210 at Best Buy 0 See it 10 Photos $155 at Google Express Turo is kind of like Uber meets Airbnb: You borrow someone’s car, but you do all the driving. I’ve used it many times and found it a great alternative to traditional car-rental services — in part because you get to choose exactly the vehicle you want (not just, say, “midsize”) and in part because you can often do pickup and dropoff right outside baggage claim.Between now and Sept. 1, the first 300 people to check out can get $30 off any Turo rental with promo code LDW30. Use promo code 19LABOR10 to get an unusually good deal on JBL’s interesting hybrid product — not quite headphones, and not quite a traditional speaker, but something you wear like neckphones to listen to music on the go. Formerly known as the Google Home Hub, Google’s Nest Hub packs a wealth of Google Assistant goodness into a 7-inch screen. At $59, this is within a buck of the best price we’ve seen. It lists for $129 and sells elsewhere in the $89-to-$99 range.This is one item of many available as part of eBay’s Labor Day Sale (which, at this writing, doesn’t specifically mention Labor Day, but that’s how it was pitched to us). See It Welcome to sewer hell.  South West Water The fatberg menace continues to haunt the UK. South West Water, which services an area in southern England, discovered a fatberg clogging up the sewers in Devon, and it’s a whopper. Lenovo Smart Clock: $59.99 (save $20) Recently updated to include digital-photo-frame capabilities, the Lenovo Smart Clock brings Google Assistant goodness to your nightstand. It’s a little smaller than the Amazon Echo Show 5, but also a full $30 less (and tied with Prime Day pricing) during this Best Buy Labor Day sale. Though not technically a Labor Day sale, it’s happening during Labor Day sale season — and it’s too good not to share. Nationwide Distributors, via Google Express, has just about the best AirPods deal we’ve seen (when you apply promo code ZBEDWZ at checkout). This is for the second-gen AirPods with the wireless charging case. Can’t imagine these will last long at this price, so if you’re interested, act fast. Tags $999 Read the Rylo camera preview $6 at Tidal Chris Monroe/CNET Free Echo Dot with an Insignia or Toshiba TV (save $50) $299 at Amazon Sarah Tew/CNET Sarah Tew/CNET Spotify and most other streaming services rely on compressed audio, which robs the listener of full fidelity. Enter Tidal, the only “major” service that delivers lossless audio — meaning at least on par with CD quality, if not better. Want to see (er, hear) the difference for yourself? Grab this excellent extended trial while you can. It’s just $6 for three months, and it’s good for up to six listeners. What’s cooler: A snapshot of a firework exploding in front of you, or full 360-degree video of all the fireworks and all the reactions to seeing them? Oooh, ahhh, indeed. At $250, the compact Rylo dual-lens camera is selling for its lowest price yet. And for an extra $50, you can get the bundle that includes the waterproof housing.This deal runs through Sept. 3; it usually costs $500. JBL Soundgear wearable speaker: $90 (save $160) When fatbergs attack Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $90 at Daily Steals via Google Express Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case: $155 (save $45) Random,I’m shocked — shocked! — to learn that stores are turning Labor Day into an excuse to sell stuff. Wait — no, I’m not. As much as I respect the original intent of the holiday (which became official back in 1894), to most of us, it’s just a bonus day off — one that’s blissfully tacked onto a weekend. So, yeah, stores; go ahead, run your sales. I’m listening. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Labor Day doesn’t bring out bargains to compete with the likes of Black Friday (which will be here before you know it), but there are definitely some sales worth your time.For example:We’ve rounded up the best Labor Day mattress deals.We’ve also gathered the best Labor Day laptop deals at Best Buy.The 2019 Vizio P Series Quantum is back under $999.Be sure to check out Amazon’s roughly three dozen Labor Day deals on TVs and audio. Google Express is having a big sale as well, one that includes deals on game consoles, AirPods, iPhones, laptops and more.Below I’ve rounded up a handful of individual items I consider to be the cream of the crop, followed by a handy reference guide to other Labor Day sales. Keep in mind, of course, that products may sell out at any time, even if the sale itself is still running. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. $59 at eBay Read DJI Osmo Action preview $261 at Daily Steals via Google Express It will take a sewer team about eight weeks to remove the massive fatberg using high-pressure jets, shovels and pickaxes.In case you’re not grossed out enough already, you can tour the horrifying lump in 360 degrees on Facebook. Want more? The Museum of London offers a live video feed of a chunk of fatberg to feed your nightmares. The problem with most entry-level laptops: They come with mechanical hard drives. That makes for a mighty slow Windows experience. This Lenovo model features a 128GB solid-state drive, so it should be pretty quick to boot and load software, even with its basic processor. Plus, it has a DVD-burner! That’s not something you see in many modern laptops, especially at this price. Sarah Tew/CNET 7 Tidal 3-month family subscription: $5.99 (save $54) Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Wacky science images from the Getty (pictures) $60 at Best Buy $999 Turo Boost Mobile Angela Lang/CNET Tags Rylo TVs Speakers Mobile Accessories Cameras Laptops Automobiles Smart Speakers & Displays DJI Osmo Action camera: $261 (save $89) Share your voice Sprint Lenovo 130-15AST 15.6-inch laptop: $210 (save $90) Read Google Home Hub review See at Turo Google Nest Hub: $59 (save $70) Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See at Amazon Amazon The Cheapskate Best Buy I thought this might be a mistake, but, no, the weirdly named HP Laptop 15t Value is indeed quite the value at this price. Specs include an Intel Core i7 processor, 12GB of RAM, a 256GB solid-state drive and a 15.6-inch display. However, I strongly recommend paying an extra $50 to upgrade that display to FHD (1,920×1,080), because you’re not likely to be happy with the native 1,366×768 resolution. Sarah Tew/CNET The 210-foot (64 meter) fatberg is part of a modern problem where old sewer systems get packed full of congealed lumps of cooking oil, diapers, wipes and grease. London unveiled a particularly epic fatberg in 2017. The monstrous masses have to be physically removed from their lairs.”Fortunately, the fatberg has had no impact on Sidmouth’s excellent bathing water quality and has been discovered in good time,” South West Water reported Tuesday.. The utility reminded customers to only flush the “3Ps”: pee, paper and poo. See It $999 An Echo Dot makes a fine match for any Fire edition TV, because you can use the latter to say things like, “Alexa, turn on the TV.” Right now, the 24-inch Insignia Fire TV Edition starts at just $100, while the 32-inch Toshiba Fire TV Editions is on sale for $130. Just add any Fire TV Edition to your cart, then add a third-gen Echo Dot, and presto: The latter is free. HP Laptop 15t Value: $520 (save $780) Other Labor Day sales you should check out Best Buy: In addition to some pretty solid MacBook deals that have been running for about a week already, Best Buy is offering up to 40% off major appliances like washers, dryers and stoves. There are also gift cards available with the purchase of select appliances. See it at Best BuyDell: Through Aug. 28, Dell is offering an extra 12% off various laptops, desktops and electronics. And check back starting Aug. 29 for a big batch of Labor Day doorbusters. See it at DellGlassesUSA: Aug. 29 – Sept. 3 only, you can save 65% on all frames with promo code labor65. See it at GlassesUSALenovo: The tech company is offering a large assortment of deals and doorbusters through Labor Day, with the promise of up to 56% off certain items — including, at this writing, the IdeaPad 730S laptop for $700 (save $300).See it at LenovoLensabl: Want to keep the frames you already love and paid for? Lensabl lets you mail them in for new lenses, based on your prescription. From now through Sept. 2 only, you can save 20% on the blue light-blocking lens option with promo code BLOCKBLUE. See it at LensablSears: Between now and Sept. 7, you can save up to 40% on appliances (plus an additional 10% if you shop online), up to 60% on mattresses, up to 50% on Craftsman products and more. The store is also offering some fairly hefty cashback bonuses. See it at SearsNote: This post was published previously and is continuously updated with new information.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on tech products and much more. For the latest deals and updates, follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page, and find more great buys on the CNET Deals page. Rylo 5.8K 360 Video Camera: $250 (save $250) Apple iPhone XS Post a comment Turo: Save $30 on any car rental Help name this disgusting 140-ton sewer fatberg Putrid fatberg is museum’s ‘most disgusting display ever’ See It Comments Read the AirPods review Read Lenovo Smart Clock review $520 at HP DJI’s answer to GoPro’s action cameras is rugged little model that’s shockproof, dustproof and waterproof down to 11 meters. It normally runs $350, but this deal drops it to $261 when you apply promo code 19LABOR10 at checkout.last_img read more

admin September 10, 2019 gfcnhr Leave a Comment

Read More

Thailand urged to help Rohingyas avert new wave of boatpeople

first_imgRohingyaThailand faced mounting calls on Thursday to stop pushing migrants back out to sea amid fears an exodus of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar could spark a new wave of boatpeople.Fighting in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state has forced about half a million Rohingya to seek refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh since August, prompting concerns they could be targeted by people smugglers and human traffickers.Rohingya Muslims, who are denied citizenship in Buddhist-majority Myanmar, have been fleeing strife for decades.Neighbouring Thailand was a popular transit route by boat and land until a 2015 Thai police crackdown led to ships full of migrants being abandoned at sea.“Thailand urgently needs to set a regional example by adopting humane refugee policies,” said Audrey Gaughran from Amnesty International as the group released a report accusing Thai authorities of failing to protect refugees.“Instead of callously repelling people fleeing unimaginable horrors, the Thai government should ensure safe passage for those seeking international protection in Thailand,” said the global issues director.Campaigners say the Rohingya are likely to start travelling after the monsoon in late November when the water is calmer.Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha said last month his government is “preparing to receive” people fleeing Myanmar and send them back “when they are ready”.But the Internal Security Operations Command (ISOC), a military unit dealing with national security, recently told local media it would continue to prevent refugees from entering Thailand. The ISOC did not reply to a request for comment.In an open letter this week, campaign group Fortify Rights urged Thailand to abandon its “push back” policy.“Thailand’s leaders should be doing all they can to stem the violence in Myanmar and prepare to provide protection to refugees fleeing the attacks,” executive director Amy Smith said.Thailand does not recognise the status of any refugees or recognise the Rohingya as legitimate migrant workers.last_img read more

admin September 3, 2019 ldaufm Leave a Comment

Read More

Deltas 50 million quest to end lost airline luggage

first_imgTags: Delta Delta’s $50 million quest to end lost airline luggage Wednesday, August 31, 2016 Posted by Sharecenter_img LINTHICUM — Victor DaRosa stands under a scorching afternoon sun, loading bags onto a jet heading to Detroit.As each suitcase climbs up the conveyor belt into the plane, a small computer verifies that it actually belongs on that flight. If one bag didn’t, a red light would flash and the belt would stop until somebody acknowledges the mistake and reroutes the luggage.This is the future of baggage handling. Delta Air Lines is investing $50 million to soothe one of air travel’s biggest headaches: lost and delayed luggage.Delta carried nearly 120 million checked suitcases last year, collecting $25 in fees, each way, for most domestic bags. For that price, fliers expect their suitcase to be waiting on the carousel when they arrive. Delta already has one of the airline industry’s best luggage handling records — just 1 out of every 500 bags failed to arrive on time — but hopes that by deploying a RFID, or radio-frequency identification, tracking system globally it can improve further.If the system works, other airlines are likely to follow. Ultimately the bag tag might be replaced with permanent RFID readers in our suitcases, reducing the chances fliers in the future will start a vacation missing their swimsuit.“It’s a very smart move,” says Henry Harteveldt, founder of travel consultancy Atmosphere Research Group. “It’s one that will help increase customer confidence that their bags will arrive with them.”RFID wirelessly identifies tags attached to items. The technology is widely used at warehouses to track goods but Delta’s rollout is the first global use for passenger bags.To better understand the technology, think about your local supermarket. If every grocery item had an RFID tag, cashiers wouldn’t have to scan each product at checkout. Instead, the groceries would pass by a scanner and be instantly registered. Shoppers could even leave everything in their cart, having it all tallied at once.The same principles apply to checked luggage.Most airlines today use barcodes on tags to identify each suitcase — each tag has its own unique 10-digit number — and make sure it is loaded onto the right plane. But reading each barcode with a handheld scanner is time consuming. Often, a bag or two aren’t scanned or error messages are missed by workers focused on getting planes out on time.More news:  Flight Centre Travel Group takes full ownership of Quebec-based agencyDelta designed its system to stop those errors. At the airline’s 84 largest airports — accounting for 85 per cent of its passengers — Delta will have 1,500 special belt loaders with RFID readers built in. Those loaders — like the one DaRosa was using — stop when a bag for a different flight is accidently placed on the belt.“It’s amazing technology,” says DaRosa, a ramp supervisor who has been testing the technology at Baltimore Washington International Airport. “It’s going to totally eliminate a bunch of careless little errors.”Replacing handheld scanners allows ramp workers to use both hands to lift bags, reducing injuries and speeding up the loading and unloading process. RFID also shortens the time needed to find and remove a bag from a plane at the last second. All of that means more on-time flights.Delta is also using RFID to track bags through the labyrinth of conveyor belts below terminals. If bags fall off a belt at a particular curve or get suck at a junction, Delta will now have enough RFID readers — about 5,200 globally — to pinpoint the trouble spot and fix it. The Atlanta-based airline says it plans to have the system online in 344 airports by the end of August.The new tags look like traditional ones. But if held up to the light, passengers can see a fingernail-size chip and a credit card size antenna inlayed inside.By the end of this year, fliers will be able to track their bags through the Delta smartphone app, getting push notifications at each step of the journey. If a bag misses its flight, passengers are also notified instantly.That way passengers “aren’t standing at a baggage carousel waiting for the last piece of luggage to come off to realize their bag isn’t there,” says Sandy Gordon, Delta’s vice-president of airport operations for the eastern U.S.Most passengers’ bags do arrive on time. But there are so hiccups, with 1 out of every 500 bags Delta carried last year failing to do so. It’s a record surpassed by only Virgin America and JetBlue Airways, which both have smaller and simpler route networks. Twice as many were delayed last year on American Airlines, according to statistics reported to the Department of Transportation.More news:  Beep, beep! Transat hits the streets with Cubamania truckBags often get delayed when bad weather forces tight connections or passengers are rerouted onto new flights.Of the 245,000 bags Delta mishandled last year, 208,000 of them arrived within three hours, according to the airline. Another 25,000 were reunited with passengers within 12 hours. The remaining 12,000 were either lost or took more than 12 hours to be delivered.Installing RFID isn’t going to solve all of Delta’s baggage problems. But the airline estimates a 10-per cent reduction in delayed bags. That means about 25,000 fewer bags the airline has to deliver to passengers’ homes, offices or hotel rooms.For the past five years, Australian airline Qantas has offered a permanent RFID bag tag that fliers can purchase for about $23 and use when flying the airline domestically. Several big airports, including those in Las Vegas, Hong Kong, Milan and Tokyo, use RFID to track bags through parts of their systems.But Delta, the world’s second largest carrier by passenger traffic, is providing the most-comprehensive tracking the industry has seen to date.Airlines have long found RFID too pricey but the cost has dropped. McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas says it currently pays 12 cents for each RFID tag, down from 21.5 cents a decade ago. Traditional tags cost the airport 3 cents.Delta refused to say how much it’s paying for RFID bag tags, except that it is less than 10 cents each.The new tracking system won’t follow every suitcase.There are limitations.It includes bags checked at the gate and claimed at a baggage carousel. But items like strollers or bags checked at the gate for regional jets — those picked up at the arriving gate — currently aren’t tracked with RFID.If a Delta passenger connects onto a flight with a Delta partner like Air France, the traditional barcode tag takes over for the final leg of the journey. However, an Air France passenger connecting to a Delta flight gets a RFID sticker added to the traditional tag when their luggage first enters Delta’s possession.And nothing is preventing the airline from losing your bag if any of these tags get ripped off along the way. The Canadian Press << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

admin August 20, 2019 pxushk Leave a Comment

Read More

Iceland Cambodia battle overtourism with new tax restrictions

first_imgIceland, Cambodia battle over-tourism with new tax & restrictions REYKJAVIK — Iceland, already known for being an expensive destination, is considering a new tourist tax that would limit the impact of over-tourism.According to The Star, the country’s government is considering ways of raising taxes in the tourism sector, which include a special licence required for bus companies and tour operators and increasing the existing levy on hotel rooms.The country is experiencing a surge in visitors – up from 490,000 in 2010 to 2.3 million in 2016 – thanks in large part to the popular TV series ‘Game of Thrones’. Considering that Iceland’s total population is less than 340,000, the country simply cannot keep up with tourist demand.Tourism Minister Kolbrun Reykfjord Gylfadottir said in a recent interview that “all of us have to be careful not to become victims of our own success.” She said that overcrowding may harm natural treasures like the Blue Lagoon and Jokulsarlon, and that “if we allow more people into areas like that, we’re losing what makes them special.”More news:  TRAVELSAVERS welcomes Julie Virgilio to the teamA new tax will not go over well with tourists, who already face steep prices when visiting Iceland. Taking a taxi from the airport to the city centre costs about $150, while the cost of alcoholic beverages is twice as much as in other European destinations.Facing a similar situation is Cambodia, which says over-tourism is damaging the infrastructure of the Angkor temple complex, its most famous attraction. The Telegraph reports that the hill at Phnom Bakheng has become so overwrought with tourists during sunsets that Aprasar’s Tourism Management Agency will restrict the area to a maximum 300 visitors at any one time.Phoeun Sophoan, the president of the Agency, told Agence Kampuchea Presse that the organization has arranged alternative places for tourists to see the sunset on the hill without actually going up to the temple. Tags: Cambodia, Iceland Friday, March 17, 2017 Posted bycenter_img Share Travelweek Group << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

admin August 19, 2019 ldaufm Leave a Comment

Read More