Scientific Findings Can Be Counterintuitive

first_img(Visited 518 times, 3 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Here are examples of recent claims in science that seem to contradict what some would consider intuitively obvious.  They should be kept in mind when evaluating other widely-accepted scientific truisms, like evolution.PhysOrg: Tough love, not small, incremental effort, is needed to turn around failing schools.Medical Xpress:  Conservatives with their strict morality tend to be happier than fancy-free liberals.BBC News:  The large horns on rhinoceros beetles do not slow them down during flight.Nature: Greenland defied ancient global warming.PhysOrg:  Geo-engineering to reduce global warming can have severe unintended consequences.Nature: Tropical forests are unexpectedly resilient to climate change.PhysOrg: African elephants do better in educated countries than in those with large nature reserves.Live Science: Fossil footprint depth can be misleading; depth is not necessarily related to pressure.Nature: The anus is a sophisticated organ.  Calling it a “remarkable orifice,” author Mary Roach said, “No engineer could design something as multifunctional and fine-tuned as an anus.  To call someone an asshole is really bragging him up.”In a final example of counterintuitive findings, Live Science now claims that brain size didn’t drive human evolution.  It’s the organization of the brain, not its size, that makes the difference between humans and lower primates.  What would Morton and Broca have thought?  This contradicts decades of assumptions about what drove humans forward in evolution.  But was the prefrontal cortex the “driving force” in the human brain, as the article assumed, or a distinguishing characteristic of an already well-designed being?  Who would argue the evolutionary line without assuming it to be the seat of rationality?Science is supposed to lead us away from seductive, fallible intuition (Bacon‘s Idols of the Theater) toward verifiability.  Yet scientists often contradict one another.  One thing is true this year; the opposite the next.  Don’t let intuition be your guide.  Darwin’s natural selection may seem intuitively obvious the way it is usually presented, but it is a vacuous idea: the Stuff Happens Law (9/15/2008, 9/22/2009).  We must not be fooled, even when the majority falls in line with insufficiently argued suppositions.last_img read more

admin December 19, 2019 tavpgy Leave a Comment

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Nelson Makamo takes his art to rural communities

first_imgArtist Nelson Makamo’s subjects have all come from impoverished communities but they have never seen his works. Now, Makamo is looking to take his art to primary schools around the country by painting murals on its walls. (Image: Shamin Chibba)Artists bring beauty to the world. Yet, most people cannot afford or don’t have access to such items. It is for this reason that South Africa’s freshest painter, Nelson Makamo, is taking his work to less privileged communities in South Africa.Makamo is embarking on a countrywide school mural project that will not only bring beauty to impoverished schools, but will also improve facilities. “Before we plan a mural we have to do something else for the school,” said Makamo. “The mural will remind us that we came into a school without a football ground and worked together to build it a football ground.”Makamo is planning to help one rural school in each province. “When you drive around South Africa and look at the schools, there’s nothing with which you can identify a school from a distance. You find the schools are struggling.”Makamo came up with the idea after he realised influential individuals, like himself, have the power to help poor communities. “I was one of those people who used to say the government doesn’t do this, the government doesn’t do that. But in most cases it is targeted to me. As a normal citizen, if I have the ability to do something why don’t I do it.Makamo’s works have been collected by the likes of British singer Annie Lennox and fashion designer Giorgio Armani, but it is the work he wants to take to rural communities that he is most excited about. (Image: Shamin Chibba)“If children go to school barefoot or cold they will not be able to concentrate. So I realised I have to start adopting schools.”Makamo said influential people should help improve the lives of others and set an example by doing so. “The more your profile grows the more you can influence others to be a part of it.”Though there are a few who are interested in financially supporting the project, the artist is looking to fund it from his own pocket where possible.POOR COMMUNITIES CONNECT TO MAKAMO’S ARTMakamo grew up in Modimolle, a small town in Limpopo, and its people have been the inspiration for his art since he started. Most of his work depicts young boys doing ordinary things: playing, laughing, walking, or looking curious or ponderous.He doesn’t boast about wealthy people having his work in their private collections, even though they include British singer Annie Lennox and fashion designer Giorgio Armani. But he speaks enthusiastically about creating art for the communities he relates to.“In any interview that I had, I never proudly said so and so has my work because I think it’s unfair to those who would truly connect with the work beyond the price tag. You may find that the work is not even hanging in their house that it’s in storage. Every now and then I try to see if I can make it possible for the ordinary person to view my work.”ACCESS TO MAKAMO’S WORKMakamo’s studio manager, Matsela Moshokoa, said the mural project will give poorer communities an opportunity to view his work.“Nelson wants to take his art back to the community where he grew up in, the community that he paints, because those are the faces of his community. And the perfect place to go to is primary schools because those are the places where you learn to have dreams.“It will highlight the plight of our primary schools. Especially in rural areas.”Besides beautifying schools, the murals will provide a space where learners can play and have their lunch, said Moshokoa.Children will relate to it because it is created by an artist who is one of them. “It’s from a person that once looked like them, that comes from the same background, and they can see themselves in him as much as he can see himself in the kids.”PLAY YOUR PARTHave you or anyone you know done anything to uplift your community? If so, share your story with us.If you have a story to tell, be it your own or that of an organisation or initiative dear to you, submit your story or video to our website and tell us how South Africa is playing a part to build a better life for all.last_img read more

admin December 18, 2019 cxfhhv Leave a Comment

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Odisha mulling ways to escape liquor sale order

first_imgThe Odisha government is considering changing the status of its roads soon after Rajasthan, Punjab and Maharashtra did the same in an attempt to circumvent the Supreme Court’s ban on sale of liquor within 500 metres of national and State highways. States like Goa, Haryana and West Bengal, too, are mulling the same to escape the 500-metre cap.According to a notification issued by the State Works Department, all sections of roads within the limits of the municipal corporations, notified area councils, headquarters of sub-divisions, blocks and tehsils have been classified as ‘urban roads’.“These roads shall be worked on taking into account all aspects under the State Plan for improvement of urban roads. This notification does not cover national highways passing through urban areas,” the department said.‘No notification’“We are yet to receive a copy of the notification. If classification of roads has been changed, then there should not be any hindrance in opening liquor shops. The notification, however, will be thoroughly examined before a decision is taken,” said Bishnupada Sethi, Excise Secretary (Odisha).Most liquor outlets along the national and State highways have been shut since April 1 after the SC observed that drunken driving was one of the major causes behind accidents.The Odisha government, however, has been worried about the cascade effect of the ban. Besides the loss to excise revenue, tourism and hospitality industries have also been hit by the decision.last_img read more

admin December 3, 2019 bkqbtj Leave a Comment

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STAKEHOLDERS CONCLUDE FORUM ON BANNING OF FGM

first_imgBy Aja Musu Bah DaffehThe Young People of the Media (YPM) held a two day stakeholders forum on banning of FGM at NaNA Conference Hall whcih concluded on the 31st of December, 2016. The objective of the forum was to sensitise on the eradication of the harmful practice of FGM with the theme “Accelerating our collective effective efforts in Ending FGM in our Generation”.Fatou E. Muloshi, the vice president of YPM, who also doubles as the chairperson of the program, said the forum is part of the activities under the YPM TGG grant agreement which is a grant geared towards ending FGM and GBV.She noted that YPM, over the years, as a child led organization, has been embarking on series of activities to effect positive change in the lives of children noting that this been done through effective child participation on issues affecting their wellbeing while using the media to disseminate information and advocate for children’s rights and protection issues.Muloshi asserted that the forum is to help activists in their fight against the harmful practices in order to become better equipped with information and understanding of the laws relating to FGM.Mr. Abdou Jatta, the Executive Coordinator YPM, said the forum has come at a right time, one year down the line after the presidential pronouncement on the banning of FGM and amendments of anti FGM laws on the Women’s Act 2005. “Due to the cultural sensitivity surrounding FGM, discussing it in homes and communities used to be a taboo, today the issue has become a household word in the Gambia. This is a big achievement which is as a result of rigorous advocacy, social mobilization, sensitization etc. As advocates we should not be complacent in our efforts to end FGM just because it has been banned, instead we need to redouble effort and use the best practices and lessons learnt from our previous interventions to introduce more innovative approaches which will speed up the total abandonment of FGM in the Gambia,” Mr. Jatta noted.He continued that FGM has a barrier to girl’s education, as young girls drop out from school to get married which impacts negatively on the community as whole and on the well-being of future generations noting that YPM and its strategic partners such as UNICEF, TGG, MoBSE, FAWEGAM, DSW,CPA, NWGBV seeks to promote the implementation of these children’s Act 2005 and the Trafficking in persons Act 2007.The Program Officer for the Girl Generation, Musu Bakoto Sawo Ceesay, said the girl generation is a global body that supports efforts to end FGM in The Gambia and to ensure positive change that can sensitise parents on the side effects of FGM to enable them to cease the mutilate of their children.Madam Sawo Ceesay said they have a youth led movement in the Gambia which is currently operating in Nigeria as well as Korea in order to amplify their voices so that the harmful practice can come to an end by taking the do no harm guideline. She continued that the campaign of ending FGM in the Gambia has been going for over three decades now and the youths have a very key role to play as the older generation had already their part.Mr. Filly Nyassi the Senior Program Officer, Department of Social Welfare representing the Director for Social Welfare Fanta Bai Secka asserted the same sentiments in the ban of FGM in The Gambia. Participants later participated effectively in order to make the forum lively and also group presentation where done on the effects of FGM with its solutions.last_img read more

admin September 19, 2019 tavpgy Leave a Comment

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QLED or OLED We compare the two best TV technologies

first_img Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Tags 86 18 Photos 2:18 Share your voice LG C9 OLED TV has the best picture quality ever What is quantum dot? Quantum dots are microscopic molecules that, when hit by light, emit their own, differently colored light. In QLED TVs, the dots are contained in a film, and the light that hits them is provided by an LED backlight. That light then travels though a few other layers inside the TV, including a liquid crystal (LCD) layer, to create the picture. The light from the LED source is transmitted through the layers to the screen’s surface, which is why we say it’s “transmissive.” lg-display-booth-ces-2017-1495-001.jpgA look at the “sandwich” of layers in an LCD TV, where an LED backlight shines through a quantum dot layer (among others) and on to the LCD panel itself. Josh Miller/CNET Samsung has been using quantum dots to augment its LCD TVs since 2015, and debuted the QLED TV branding in 2017. Samsung says those quantum dots have evolved over time — that color and light output have improved, for example. In my experience however, improvements caused by better quantum dots are much less evident than those caused by other image quality factors (see below).Other TV makers also use quantum dots in LCD TVs, including TCL and Vizio, but don’t call them QLED TVs. An OLED TV is not an LCD TV at all LCD is the dominant technology in flat-panel TVs and has been for a long time. It’s cheaper than OLED, especially in larger sizes, and numerous panel makers worldwide, including LG itself, can manufacture it. LG OLEDC8P seriesOLED TVs don’t need LED backlights so, in addition to image quality benefits, they can get amazingly thin. Sarah Tew/CNET OLED is different because it doesn’t use an LED backlight to produce light. Instead, light is produced by millions of individual OLED subpixels. The pixels themselves — tiny dots that compose the image — emit light, which is why it’s called an “emissive” display technology. That difference leads to all kinds of picture quality effects, some of which favor LCD (and QLED), but most of which benefit OLED. Aside from LG, Sony also sells OLED TVs in the US, while Panasonic and Philips sell them in Europe. All use panels manufactured by LG Display, however. A closer look at MicroLED Before that we’ll get MicroLED. It’s another emissive technology, again spearheaded by Samsung, that seems closer to market than direct-view quantum dot. As you might guess from the name, it uses millions of teeny-tiny LEDs as pixels. MicroLED has the potential for the same perfect black levels as OLED, with no danger of burn-in. It can deliver higher brightness than any current display technology, wide-gamut excellent color and doesn’t suffer the viewing angle and uniformity issues of LCD. It doesn’t involve quantum dots, at least not yet, but who knows what might happen when it comes to market. QDMLED, anyone? For now, however, OLED rules the picture quality roost over QLED. At least until somebody combines the two. Originally published Feb. 8, 2017.Update, July 18, 2019: This article has been updated extensively for 2019. Now playing: Watch this: Samsung uses QLED for its best TVs, including this 8K model. Sarah Tew/CNET Two rival TV brands use very similar acronyms to describe their best TVs. But QLED and OLED are as different as leopards and lions. For the last few years Samsung, the most popular TV-maker in the world, has been branding its best TVs “QLED.” Its 2019 QLED lineup is bigger than ever, with seven series encompassing 28 different models. From insane 98-inch 8K behemoths to TVs designed to look like paintings and modern art, QLEDs represent the pinnacle of what Samsung’s formidable engineers can bring to TV buyers.  But it’s not the pinnacle of picture quality. That honor goes to OLED TVs. Based on the last few years of CNET’s side-by-side comparison reviews, LG’s OLED TVs have all delivered better overall image quality than Samsung QLED TVs. The latest example pitted Samsung’s 2018 Q9 QLED against LG’s 2019 C9 OLED and the LG OLED won handily, delivering the best picture quality I’ve ever tested. In fact the LG B8 from 2018 also beat the Samsung. The Q9 is still an excellent performer, however, and delivers the best non-OLED image I’ve ever tested — but not because of QLED technology.In June 2019 I reviewed the midrange Q70, which is an excellent performer but no OLED. I haven’t tested any of the highest-end 2019 QLED models yet, such as the Q80 and Q90, but if I was a betting man I’d still pick the best OLED to beat the best QLED TV once again this year, even though Samsung seems to have made more improvements than LG. Here’s why. A QLED TV is just an LCD TV with quantum dots Let’s start with a quick summary of the two technologies. OLED stands for “organic light emitting diode.”QLED (according to Samsung) stands for “quantum dot LED TV.”OLED is a fundamentally different technology from LCD, the major type of TV today.QLED is a variation of LED LCD, adding a quantum dot film to the LCD “sandwich.”OLED is “emissive,” meaning the pixels emit their own light.QLED, like LCD, is, in its current form, “transmissive” and relies on an LED backlight.The main takeaway is that QLED is closer to regular old LCD than it is to OLED, which I (and most other experts) consider a distinctly different class of television, much like plasma was before it. QLED vs. OLED: image quality compared Based on my reviews, here are some general comparisons I’ve made between the two.QLED TV picture quality varies more than OLED. Samsung has a bunch of QLED series, and the most expensive perform a lot better than the cheaper ones. That’s mainly because the biggest improvements in the picture quality of Samsung’s sets don’t have much to do with quantum dots. In 2019 TVs like the Q70, Q80 and Q90, they’re the result of better full-array local dimming, bright highlights and better viewing angles, which help them significantly outperform QLED TVs that lack those extras, like the Q60 in 2019.Meanwhile every OLED TV I’ve reviewed has very similar image quality — all have earned a 10/10 in picture quality in my tests. There is some variation among different OLED TVs, but they’re not nearly as significant as the differences between various QLED TV series.OLED has better contrast and black level. One of the most important image quality factors is black level, and their emissive nature means OLED TVs can turn unused pixels off completely, for literally infinite contrast. QLED/LCD TVs, even the best ones with the most effective full-array local dimming, let some light through, leading to more washed-out, grayer black levels and blooming around bright sections. QLED is brighter. The brightest QLED and LCD TVs can get brighter than any OLED model, which is a particular advantage in bright rooms and with HDR content. In my tests, however, OLED TVs can still get plenty bright for most rooms, and their superior contrast still allows them to deliver a better overall HDR image than any QLED/LCD TV I’ve tested. howwetest-tvlab-2017-cnet-11 Sarah Tew/CNET OLED has better uniformity and viewing angles. With LCD-based displays, different areas of the screen can appear brighter than others all the time, and backlight structure can also be seen in some content. Even the best LCDs also fade, lose contrast and become discolored when seen from seats other than the sweet spot directly in front of the screen. OLED TVs have almost perfectly uniform screens and maintain fidelity from all but the most extreme angles. Resolution, color, video processing and other image quality factors are basically the same. Most QLED and OLED have the same resolution, 4K, and both can achieve 8K resolution too. Neither technology has major inherent advantage in color or video processing areas. Check out OLED vs. LCD for more details. QLED can get bigger and smaller (and cheaper)There are only four sizes of OLED TV on the market today: 55-, 65-, 77- and 88-inch. Since the latter two cost $6,500 and (cough) $30,000 respectively, there’s really only two sizes most TV shoppers can afford. 35-samsung-q900Samsung’s 85-inch 8K QLED TV (above) costs $15,000.  Sarah Tew/CNET Meanwhile Samsung’s QLED TVs come in 43-, 49-, 55-, 65-, 75-, 82-, 85- and, yes, 98-inch sizes. Of course non-QLED LCD TVs can get even smaller.One big advantage, so to speak, that QLED and LCD have over OLED is the cost of mainstream sizes over 65 inches. Large televisions are the fastest-growing segment of the market and show no signs of slowing down. As I mentioned above, LG’s 77-inch OLED costs $6,500. Meanwhile Samsung’s 75-inch Q70 QLED costs $2,200 and Vizio’s 75-inch P-Series Quantum is even less. Sure, neither one can beat an OLED, but they’re still excellent performers for one-third the price.In 55- and 65-inch sizes, the highest-end, best-performing QLED models like the Q90 and the 8K resolution Q900A cost more than the cheapest OLED TV. There are numerous other, less-expensive QLED series as well, however, albeit with worse image quality.  What about OLED burn-in? Burn-in happens when a persistent part of the image onscreen — navigation buttons on a phone, or a channel logo, news ticker or a scoreboard on a TV, for example — remains as a ghostly background no matter what else appears onscreen. All OLED screens can burn-in, and from everything we know, they’re more susceptible than LCD displays, including QLED. All things considered, however, burn-in shouldn’t be a problem for most people. From all of the evidence we’ve seen, burn-in is typically caused by leaving a single, static image element, like a channel logo, onscreen for a very long time, repeatedly. That’s an issue if you keep Fox News, ESPN or MSNBC onscreen for multiple hours every day and don’t watch enough other programming, for example. But as long as you vary what’s displayed, chances are you’ll never experience burn-in. Check out OLED screen burn-in: What you need to know for more. qled-by-qdvision.jpgElectroluminescent quantum dot prototypes, which could pave the way for direct-view quantum dot TVs. QDVision Future outlook for OLED vs. QLED TVs Until I test the best QLED TVs against the LG C9, I won’t know for sure which one wins in 2019, but as I mentioned above, I’d bet on OLED.  For 2019 Samsung has improved its high-end QLED image quality again in an effort to beat OLED, while LG has, aside from a processing bump, mostly stood pat. The C9 wasn’t that much better than its predecessors, and I expect the same for Sony’s new OLED TVs. But given the basic differences between OLED and QLED tech, it would definitely surprise me if those 2019 QLED improvements allowed it to beat OLED overall. What about 2020 and later? Samsung is actually working on a version of QLED that does use emissive technology, much like OLED and plasma. Known as direct-view quantum dot, it dispenses with the liquid crystal layers and uses quantum dots themselves as the light source.  Emissive QLED TVs have the potential to match the absolute black levels and “infinite” contrast ratio of OLED, with better power efficiency, better color and more. That’s pretty exciting, but it’ll be a few years before we see emissive QLED TVs available for sale. Hopefully by then they’ll think up a new acronym (EQLEDs?). TVs 2:46 Comments LG Samsung Sony Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

admin September 10, 2019 pxushk Leave a Comment

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Paywhatyouwant choices appear to be linked to self image

first_img Explore further Corporate social responsibility and profit could stem from pricing strategy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In the first experiment riders at an amusement park were given the opportunity to buy pictures of themselves on the ride and were told they could pay whatever they wanted. Some were also told that half the proceeds would go to a charity; in those cases customers quite often paid more than those that weren’t told about the charity, though the number of sales were lower.In a second experiment, some customers on boat rides were asked to pay $15, some $5 and the others whatever they wanted, for pictures of themselves. Not surprisingly, the $15 group had few takers, while the $5 option proved popular, even more so than the PWYW option, as more chose to pass on the photos altogether when given the opportunity to pay whatever they liked.In the third experiment, diners at a restaurant were asked to pay whatever price they chose for their meal, but were split into two groups. One group paid the owner of the restaurant directly, while the other group was allowed to pay privately by dropping an envelope into a box. Surprisingly, the group that was able to pay anomalously generally paid more than did those that paid the owner directly.The researchers say taken as a whole, these experiments show that people are motivated by several factors when presented with a PWYW opportunity; the most basic of which, is the desire to uphold their opinion of themselves. Giving more than is necessary in an anonymous way causes people to feel good about themselves. On the other hand, the offer is less appealing when being asked to pay in view of others, such as fellow patrons or the owner of a restaurant. In such a scenario, people feel forced into paying a certain price. They also shy away from opportunities when they feel pressured to buy at a price that is too high, hence those that choose to not buy at all, even when allowed to pay whatever they wanted. More information: Pay-what-you-want, identity, and self-signaling in markets, PNAS, Published online before print April 23, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1120893109AbstractWe investigate the role of identity and self-image consideration under “pay-what-you-want” pricing. Results from three field experiments show that often, when granted the opportunity to name the price of a product, fewer consumers choose to buy it than when the price is fixed and low. We show that this opt-out behavior is driven largely by individuals’ identity and self-image concerns; individuals feel bad when they pay less than the “appropriate” price, causing them to pass on the opportunity to purchase the product altogether. © 2012 Phys.Org Citation: Pay-what-you-want choices appear to be linked to self image (2012, April 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-pay-what-you-want-choices-linked-image.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) — Panera, the national restaurant chain most famous for its bread, has been in the news of late because they’ve decided to test the concept of allowing customers to pay whatever they want for bread, sandwiches and salads. The concept has proved so successful that Panera plans to open more restaurants that do likewise. To find out why such an idea might work, a group of researchers put together several field experiments to test their belief that the amount people pay for a pay-what-you-want (PWYW) opportunity, likely depends on their desire to boost their own self image. They have published a paper documenting their findings in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.last_img read more

admin August 31, 2019 gfcnhr Leave a Comment

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37th India Carpet Expo kicks off

first_imgThe 37th Edition of India Carpet Expo, organised by Carpet Export Promotion Council, was inaugurated on March 10, 2019, at NSIC Exhibition Ground, Okhla, New Delhi. The event began with lamp lighting ceremony by Raghvendra Singh, IAS, Secretary, Ministry of Textiles, Government of India, in the august presence of Shantmanu, IAS, Development Commissioner (Handicrafts). The Expo is organised with an aim to promote the cultural heritage and weaving skills of Indian hand-made carpets, and other floor coverings among the visiting overseas carpet buyers. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSpeaking at the event, Raghvendra Singh said: “We are very glad that CEPC organises this Expo twice every year to promote Indian weavers worldwide. Every year Expo generates a huge amount of business. We have everything handmade and hand weaved here, which is the major attraction to the foreign buyers.” He further appreciated the new innovations and display by the members. Chairman, CEPC highlighted that carpet industry was not incorporated in the recent decision taken by cabinet for extending ROSL (Rebate on State Levies) to the handmade carpet industry. Raghvendra Singh, Secretary Textiles immediately called for a meeting on March 11, 2019 with the representatives of the Handmade Carpet Industry to present their case and assured his best possible support to the Handmade Carpet Industry. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveShantmanu, IAS, Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) appreciated the efforts made by Chairman and Committee of Administration in organising India Carpet Expo on such a large scale and expressed hope that the benefit will ultimately go to the artisans and weavers. Mahavir Pratap Sharma, Chairman, CEPC said, “India carpet expo is an ideal platform for International Carpet Buyers, buying Agents, architects and Indian carpet manufacturers and exporters to meet and establish long term business relationship. This exhibition is a crucial step towards taking Indian exports of handmade carpet to much greater and newer heights. We have also set up a special theme pavilion wherein the experts of the industry are showcasing the process of carpet weaving through the concept of ergonomic and flexible tufting frame.” Sharma further added that orders worth over a thousand crores are expected to be executed. New fall-winter colors and designs are being showcased at the Carpet Expo. India Carpet Expo is one of the largest handmade carpet fairs in Asia that offers a unique platform for the buyers to source the best handmade carpets, rugs and other floor coverings under one roof. With the participation of over 305 exhibitors, it has become a popular destination worldwide for handmade carpets. A record number of 152 overseas carpet buyers from around 60 countries registered their presence on the first day of the fair. It is the endeavor of the Council to provide an exclusive business environment to both carpet importers as well as manufacturer-exporters, which ultimately will benefit about two million weavers and artisans employed in this highly labour intensive rural based MSME cottage industry.last_img read more

admin August 31, 2019 bkqbtj Leave a Comment

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